Selected Events (04/27) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – MONDAY, APR. 27, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

“How Shakespeare Works”: A Free Night Course
Tonight: Coriolanus: politics as theater
Cooper Union, The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street,
Each talk begins at 6:00PM and lasts for one-hour / FREE
1-212-353-4195

Gato Barbieri
Blue Note, 131 West Third St., Greenwich Village
8:00PM + 10:30PM / $30, $45
475-8592 / bluenote.net

(Un)Silent Film Night
New School University Center, 65 Fifth Avenue, at 14th Street, Greenwich Village,
7:00PM / FREE
212-229-5600, newschool.edu/events.

“Her Way: A Centennial Tribute to Frank Sinatra” (through Thur. April 30)
54 Below, 254 West 54th St.
7:00PM / $60-$105
646-476-3551, 54below.com.

Elsewhere, but this sure looks worth the detour:
Toni Morrison
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave., at 92nd St.
8:00 PM / $28
212-415-5500

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
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HOT TICKET!: The Mabel Mercer Foundation will honor Cabaret Legend Julie Wilson on Tuesday, April 28th at 6:00 pm at THE TOWN HALL (123 West 43rd Street, NYC – 212-997-1929). Wilson, who died at age ninety on April 5th, will be celebrated and remembered by her peers in a special, one-time-only performance. The all-star homage is FREE and open to the general public. Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 12 noon on Monday, April 27th, at the Town Hall box office.

“How Shakespeare Works”: A Free Night Course
Tonight: Coriolanus: politics as theater

The Cooper Union’s charter calls for free night courses open to all. This spring, we are offering “Shakespeare at Work: An Introduction to the Plays in Nine Talks,” taught by William Germano, Ph.D., Dean of Cooper Union’s Faculty of Humanities and Social sciences.

Shakespeare’s plays exert their power over us through the beauty of language, the craft of drama, and something else we can’t easily name. Or maybe we can. These talks are designed as an introduction – or reintroduction – to Shakespeare the poet-playwright-player and to the world of his plays. That world can be lyrical or violent, green or desolate, a place for love and sex or for grappling with the mysteries of time and death.

Shakespeare’s plays were performed at many places and theaters – the famous Globe is only one – but “globe” is as good a metaphor as any for the body of work that, quite miraculously, survived his death in 1616. Shakespeare’s plays teem with characters, and those characters have problems that draw us back again and again. Because five hundred years later, those problems are still with us, and the language in which he poses them continues to give us consolation, and joy, and hope.
Cooper Union,
The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, (Btw. Third & Fourth Aves.)
subway: 1-2-3 to Times Sq, transfer to N/R to 8th St.
Each talk begins at 6:00 and lasts for one-hour / FREE
1-212-353-4195

Gato Barbieri
Barbieri recorded a handful of albums on the Flying Dutchman label in the early ’70s and then signed with the Impulse imprint, where he recorded his classic Chapter Series: Latin America (1973), Hasta Siempre (1973), Viva Emiliano Zapata (1974), and Alive in New York (1975). While at Impulse, he also composed the Grammy-winning score for the film Last Tango in Paris (1972) – an achievement he parlayed into success as a film composer, scoring a dozen international films over the years in Europe, South America, and the U.S.

By the mid-’70s, Barbieri’s coarse, wailing tone began to mellow, a change evident on his ’70s A&M recordings. However, early ’80s dates like the live Gato … Para Los Amigos (1984) saw the saxophonist reclaim a more intense, rock-influenced South American sound.

After many years of limited musical activity due to the passing of his first wife Michelle (also his closest musical confidant and manager) and his own triple bypass surgery six weeks later, Barbieri returned stronger than ever with the 1997 Columbia offering Que Pasa, the fourth-highest-selling contemporary jazz album of that year. Since that reemergence, he has continued to release albums, including The Shadow of the Cat (2002), which won Billboard’s prestigious 2003 Latin Jazz Album of the Year award and garnered a Grammy nomination, and New York Meeting (2010), his latest release.
Blue Note, 131 West Third St., Greenwich Village
8:00PM + 10:30PM / $30, $45
$30 at the bar, with a $5 minimum. (sound is fine at these bar seats, vision decent)
475-8592 / bluenote.net

(Un)Silent Film Night
“The College of Performing Arts at the New School presents a free evening of ensembles providing live music for silent films, hosted by the actor Matthew Broderick. The Mannes Theater Orchestra will play a new score for the 1924 Buster Keaton film “Sherlock Jr.” The School of Jazz’s Improvisation Ensemble will also provide the music for Charlie Chaplin’s 1917 classic, “The Immigrant.” (NYT)

Under the direction of Charles Neidich, this film screening will feature contemporary music performed by ensembles to the silent films Sherlock Jr. (Buster Keaton) and The Immigrant (Charlie Chaplin); the composer Craig Marks will give a pre-concert talk.
New School University Center, 65 Fifth Avenue, at 14th Street, Greenwich Village,
7PM / FREE
212-229-5600, newschool.edu/events.

“Her Way: A Centennial Tribute to Frank Sinatra” (through Thur. April 30)
The venerable Marilyn Maye’s new show, “Her Way: A Centennial Tribute to Frank Sinatra,” is another birthday celebration of Ol’ Blue Eyes.

Any evening with Marilyn Maye is a special event, but the particular magic of Her Way is its melding of two unique artists, one in spirit, the other in the flesh, into an evening in the theater that boasts not just one but two living legends. It doesn’t get any better than this.

The aptly named production is an unabashed valentine to the late superstar, from the Super Singer that pays tribute to Sinatra’s career with an immensely talented peer’s interpretations of the songs that made Sinatra famous. It’s a full-scale labor of love for another performer that is rarely seen from an artist of Maye’s stature, and that is exactly what makes the show a must-see experience.
54 Below, 254 West 54th St.
7PM / $60-$105
646-476-3551, 54below.com.

Elsewhere, but this sure looks worth the detour:
Toni Morrison
“An exclusive New York appearance by Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, who will read from and discuss her new novel God Help the Child, a searing tale about the way childhood trauma shapes and misshapes the life of the adult.” (ThoughtGallery.org)
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave., at 92nd St.
8:00 PM / $28
212-415-5500

BONUS MUSIC PICKS:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are a few of my favorite music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St. joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St. lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd dSt. bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Metropolitan Museum of Art:
‘Reimagining Modernism: 1900-1950’ (continuing)
One of the greatest encyclopedic museums in the world fulfills its mission a little more with an ambitious reinstallation of works of early European modernism with their American counterparts for the first time in nearly 30 years. Objects of design and paintings by a few self-taught artists further the integration. It is quite a sight, with interesting rotations and fine-tunings to come. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Smith)

‘The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky’ (through May 10)
Some of the earliest surviving art by native North Americans left America long ago. Soldiers, traders and priests, with magpie eyes for brilliant things, bundled it up and shipped it across the sea to Europe. Painted robes, embroidered slippers and feathered headdresses tinkling with chimes found their way into cupboards in 18th-century London and Paris, and lay there half-forgotten. Now, with the arrival at the Met of this traveling show, some of those wondrous things — truly world masterpieces — have come home in an exhibition context that carries the Native American story from 100 B.C. into the 21st century. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Cotter)

‘Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklanski Selects From The Met Collection’ (through June 14) Complementing the survey of his photographs, the artist has orchestrated 80 works from the museum’s holdings — along with a few of his own — into a mesmerizing display meditating on sex and death. Consisting mostly of photographs, it is bolstered by paintings by Dali and Cranach sculptures from several cultures and several surprises. Scratch any artist of note, even a post-modern one, and you often find a connoisseur. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Smith)

‘Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklanski Photographs’ (through Aug. 16)
A small but succinct survey of the multimedia bad-boy artist’s polymorphous relationship to photography shows him constantly changing scale, film and printing methods while exploring the medium’s ability to startle, seduce and become generic. He appropriates, imitates and pays homage as he goes, regularly invoking his Polish roots. Don’t miss the large photo-banners in the museum’s Great Hall or the massive fiber-sculpture monument to the eye and to insatiable looking. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Smith)

Neue Galerie:
‘Egon Schiele: Portraits’ (through Sept. 07)
zakovsek_1“Of the approximately 125 items in this terrific show, there are only 11 oil paintings, which is a good thing. Except for a large picture of his wife, Edith, in a colorful striped dress, Schiele’s works on canvas are dark and turgid. But his drawings are nimble and nuanced. Working on paper with pencil, charcoal, ink, gouache, watercolor and crayons, he portrayed himself and others with infectious avidity. There’s hardly a single sheet here that doesn’t warrant close looking for its virtuoso draftsmanship and psychological acuity. 1048 Fifth Avenue, at 86th Street, 212-628-6200, neuegalerie.org. “(Johnson)

Guggenheim Museum:
Guggenheim Museum: ‘On Kawara — Silence’ (through May 3)
The first retrospective of this Conceptual Art giant turns the museum’s spiral into a vortex suffused with the consciousness of time, life’s supreme ruler, in all its quotidian daily unfoldings, historical events and almost incomprehensible grandeur. The presentation of date paintings, “I Got Up” postcards and “I AM Still Alive” telegrams echoes Mr. Kawara’s exquisite sense of discipline and craft. This is an extraordinary tribute. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org. (Smith)

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901–1911 (through spring 2015)
ex_Kandinsky_Landscape-near-Murnau-with-Locomotive_490Early in his career Vasily Kandinsky experimented with printmaking, produced brightly-colored landscapes of the German countryside, and explored recognizable and recurrent motifs. This intimate exhibition drawn from the Guggenheim collection explores the artist’s representational origins.

El Museo del Barrio:
‘Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa, Art and Film’ (through June 27)
Painting with light is one way to define the cinematographer’s task, and it describes the art of Gabriel Figueroa (1907-1997), who worked with some of the leading international film directors of his time and was a national hero in his native Mexico, the supreme painter-in-light of Mexicanidad. How do you put this particular kind of art across in a museum — art that is as much about time as it is about material, as much about flux as it is about fixity? This show, which mixes Figueroa film clips with paintings and prints by some of Mexico’s greatest artists and in the process utterly transforms El Museo’s interior spaces, gives an enthralling answer. 1230 Fifth Avenue, at 104th Street, East Harlem, 212-831-7272, elmuseo.org. (Cotter)

Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum (continuing):
rendering-3The stately doors of the 1902 Andrew Carnegie mansion, home to the Cooper Hewitt, are open again after an overhaul and expansion of the premises. Historic house and modern museum have always made an awkward fit, a standoff between preservation and innovation, and the problem remains, but the renovation has brought a wide-open new gallery space, a cafe and a raft of be-your-own-designer digital enhancements. Best of all, more of the museum’s vast permanent collection is now on view, including an Op Art weaving, miniature spiral staircases, ballistic face masks and a dainty enameled 18th-century version of a Swiss knife. Like design itself, this institution is built on tumult and friction, and you feel it. 2 East 91st Street, at Fifth Avenue, 212-849-8400, cooperhewitt.org. (Cotter)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Ten museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:

• 110th Street – Museum for African Art

• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio

• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York

• 92nd Street – The Jewish Museum

• 91st Street – Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

• 89th Street – National Academy Museum

• 88th Street – Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

• 86th Street – Neue Galerie New York

• 83rd Street – Goethe-Institut

Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
• 82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Additionally, though technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th St. and the The Morgan Library & Museum on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave. Now plan your own museum crawl. ========================================================

For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 04/25 and 04/23.
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Selected Events (04/26) + Today’s Featured Pub (WestVillage)

Today’s “Fab 5″+1/ Selected NYCity Events – SUNDAY, APR. 26, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Michel Camilo Three + Three
Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, Greenwich Village,
8PM and 10:30PM
212-475-8592, bluenote.net.

‘Night Lights at Wave Hill’ (Through May 24.)
Wave Hill, West 249th Street and Independence Avenue, Riverdale, the Bronx,
6:30PM / $25
718-549-3200.

Shastra Festival 2015
Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker St. at Thompson St
4PM / $20

“Awaken Your Practice”
New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Sixth Ave., Midtown.
A one-day pass ($285) allows access to all the activities for that day, which include specialized yoga training, lectures and workshops.

Elsewhere, but these sure look worth the detour:
“Sakura Matsuri” (LAST DAY)
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 990 Washington Avenue, at Eastern Parkway,
subway: #2,3 to Eastern Parkway
10AM – 6PM / $25
For more information, visit bbg.org / 718-623-7200.

Mark Morris Dance Group
BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Ave. (btw Ashland Pl / St. Felix St)
subway: #2,3 to Atlantic Ave
3PM / $25-$85

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Michel Camilo Three + Three
Mr. Camilo, a fastidiously percussive Dominican pianist, has ample history with the bassist Lincoln Goines and the drummer Cliff Almond, who make up his working trio. As the title of this engagement suggests, he’s augmenting that rhythm section with several guests: the trumpeter Michael Philip Mossman, the trombonist Conrad Herwig and the saxophonist Ralph Bowen.” (Chinen-NYT)

The band name Three + Three comes from the combination of the core Trio unit with a three-member horn section. The music expands from the Latin and Afro-Caribbean rhythms to the harmonies of the jazz tradition and funk elements, blending personal acoustic voices with fiercely contemporary energy.
Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, Greenwich Village,
8PM and 10:30PM
212-475-8592, bluenote.net.

‘Night Lights at Wave Hill’ (Through May 24.)
“Wave Hill, the public garden in the Bronx, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a month of after-hours events. “The Lightening: a Project for Wave Hill’s Aquatic Garden,” an installation by the artist Chris Doyle, will be on display, and the Mark Twain Room will host piano performances that cover a range of classical and jazz standards.” (NYT)
More information is at wavehill.org/events/categories/nightlights.
Wave Hill, West 249th Street and Independence Avenue, Riverdale, Far West Bronx,
Manhattan’s WestSide #1 subway to 238th St.
6:30PM / $25
718-549-3200.

Shastra Festival 2015
“Thanks to its ever-growing Indian community, New York City and its surrounding areas are experiencing a parallel surge in cultural crossover. Witness the annual Shastra Festival, a six-hour, twelve-act confluence of Indian and Western traditions. These range from tabla (Shawn Mativetsky) and drum (Dan Weiss) solos to traditional dhrupad singing (Payton MacDonald) and a string quartet performing raga-based music by organizer Reena Esmail. The bill also includes new work by Aakash Mittal, Michael Harrison, and Asha Srinvasan, along with Philip Glass’s Two Pages for voice and piano. The fest concludes with an all-hands improvisation.” (Richard Gehr, VillageVoice)
Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker St. at Thompson St
4PM/ $20

“Awaken Your Practice”
“Presented by Yoga Journal Events, this event brings together some of the biggest names in American yoga including Rodney Yee, Seane Corn, Shiva Rea, Elena Brower and Dharma Mittra for a long weekend (Thursday April 23 to Monday April 27) of yoga related activities.

Sunday’s free activities include “Raise Your Vibe: Kundalini Sadhana with Carolana Dimopoulos” from 5 a.m. and a “Morning Meditation with Coral Brown” from 7 a.m. The Yoga Market is also free and open to the public from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday.” (dnainfo.com)
New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Sixth Ave., Midtown.
A one-day pass ($285) allows access to all the activities for that day, which include specialized yoga training, lectures and workshops.

Elsewhere, but these sure look worth the detour:
“Sakura Matsuri” (LAST DAY)
“The Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s “Sakura Matsuri” (which is Japanese for “Cherry Blossom Festival”) welcomes in spring, with performances and activities under a glorious array of pink and white blossoms. There will be Kabuki dances, taiko drumming, samurai sword fighting, and Japanese standup comedy. New this year is Akim Funk Buddha’s Urban Tea Ceremony, a hip-hop reimagining of the traditional ritual. Other highlights include a “cosplay” fashion show (“cosplay” being a portmanteau of the words “costume” and “play”), a flower-hat dance parade, and workshops in origami, bonsai, and manga drawing.” (NewYorker)
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 990 Washington Avenue, at Eastern Parkway,
subway: #2,3 to Eastern Parkway
10AM – 6PM / $25
For more information, visit bbg.org / 718-623-7200.

Mark Morris Dance Group
“The master choreographer presents his company in two excellent programs that include Spring, Spring Spring, as well as two of his stellar dances set to music by Lou Harrison.

Spring officially takes hold with two programs of Mark Morris’s joyous ensemble. Today’s Program B features three works from 2013: Crosswalk, Jenn and Spencer and Spring, Spring, Spring, Morris’s take of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, arranged and performed live by The Bad Plus.” (TONY)
BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Ave. (btw Ashland Pl / St. Felix St)
subway: #2,3 to Atlantic Ave
3PM / $25-$85

BONUS JAZZ PICKS:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:
Greenwich Village:
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South — villagevanguard.com / 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. — bluenotejazz.com / 212-475-8592
55 Bar – 55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. — 55bar.com / 212-929-9883
Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662
Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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A PremierPub / West Village

Corner Bistro/ 331 W. 4th St.

Sometimes you just need a beer and a burger. If so, Corner Bistro is the place you want. Located just outside the hip Meatpacking district, this corner bar and grill is decidedly unhip, but it’s not uncrowded, especially at night. Seems that everyone knows this place has one of the better burgers in town.

kac_120405_phude_corner_bistro_bar_1000-600x450In the maze of streets known as the West Village, where West 4th intersects with West 12th (and West 11th, and West 10th, go figure), you will eventually find Corner Bistro on the corner of West 4th and Jane Street. An unassuming neighborhood tavern, it looks just like dozens of other taverns around town.

The bartender tells me that the Corner Bistro celebrated it’s 50th anniversary last year. The well worn interior tells me that the place itself is much older.

Corner Bistro has outlasted many of those other taverns around town because they know how to keep it simple — just good burgers and beer, fairly priced. The classic bistro Burger is only $6.75, and should be ordered medium rare, which will be plenty rare for most folks. Actually, it will be a juicy, messy delight – make sure you have extra napkins. I like to pull up a stool and sit by the large front window in the afternoon, where I can rest my burger and beer on the shelf, and watch the Villagers walk by.

Corner Bistro seems to attract very different groups of patrons depending on time of day. While it’s crowded with locals in the evening, in the afternoon you hear different foreign languages, and watch groups of euro tourists wander in, led by their guidebooks and smartphones.

For the classic Bistro experience, order your burger with a McSorley’s draft, the dark preferably. This is the same beer that you can get over at the original McSorley’s in the East Village, the pub that claims to be the oldest continually operating bar in NYCity. The only difference is that this McSorley’s ale is served with a smile by the bartenders here. Or you can get a Sierra Nevada, Stella, or Hoegaarden on tap if you want to go upscale a bit. Either way this is a simple, but quality burger and beer experience that is just too rare these days (sorry for the pun).
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Website: cornerbistrony.com
Phone #: 212-242-9502
Hours: 11:30am-4am Mon-Sat; 12pm-4am Sun
Happy Hour: NO
Music: Juke Box
Subway: #1/2/3 to 14th St. (S end of platform)
Walk 2 blk W. on 13th St. to 8th Ave.; 1 blk S. on 8th Ave. to Jane St.
Update:

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“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
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Selected Events (04/25) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″+1/ Selected NYCity Events – SATURDAY, APR. 25, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Brian Blade & the Fellowship Band
Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, 881 Seventh Ave.
9 p.m., / $44–$52
carnegiehall.org. / (212) 460-0019

John Scofield & Taj Mahal Celebrate Muddy Waters
Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 60th Street and Broadway,
8PM / $ need to call on this one
212-721-6500, jalc.org.

Wall to Wall Johnny Cash
Symphony Space, Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, 2537 Broadway at 95th St.
4-11PM / General admission to Wall to Wall is FREE on a first come, first served basis.
212-864-1414 / symphonyspace.org.

Luci Tapahonso
National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, Lower Manhattan,
At 2 p.m. / FREE
212-514-3700, nmai.si.edu

Elsewhere, but these look very special, worth the short detour:
“Sakura Matsuri” (ONLY 2 DAYS / April 25-26.)
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 990 Washington Avenue, at Eastern Parkway,
subway: #2,3 to Eastern Parkway
10AM – 6PM / $25
For more information, visit bbg.org / 718-623-7200.

Strike!
Gleason’s Gym, 77 Front Street, near Washington Street, Dumbo, Brooklyn,
8PM / $20
718-797-2872, gleasonsgym.net.

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Brian Blade & the Fellowship Band
“Few jazz groups do pastoral with as much panache as ubiquitous session drummer Brian Blade and his longtime, yet sparsely recorded, combo. A Southern melancholy informed last year’s Landmarks, which includes a haunting version of “Shenandoah” and the tart travelogue “Ark.La.Tex.” Following the departure of guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel, saxophonists Melvin Butler and Myron Walden, bassist Chris Thomas, and the felicitously named Jon Cowherd on piano fill out the subtle percussion powerhouse’s all-acoustic quintet.” (Richard Gehr, VillageVoice)
Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, 881 Seventh Ave.
9 p.m., / $44–$52
carnegiehall.org. / (212) 460-0019

John Scofield & Taj Mahal Celebrate Muddy Waters
“John Scofield and Taj Mahal are both guitarists with a strong foothold in the blues, though neither abides by any genre-driven rules of style. They meet for the first time on common ground, celebrating one of the greatest blues men and a mutual hero.”
(Chinen-NYT)
Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 60th Street and Broadway,
8PM / $ need to call on this one
212-721-6500, jalc.org.

Wall to Wall Johnny Cash
From Nashville to Brooklyn, and from bluegrass to blues – join us for this mini-marathon in celebration of Johnny Cash by a renowned collection of over two dozen bands and performers still paying tribute to him today.
Symphony Space, Peter Jay Sharp Theatre, 2537 Broadway at 95th St.
4-11PM / General admission to Wall to Wall is FREE on a first come, first served basis.
212-864-1414 / symphonyspace.org.

Luci Tapahonso
“Luci Tapahonso is the Navajo nation’s first poet laureate and a professor of American literary studies at the University of New Mexico. She will discuss her life and career, as well as read selections from her body of work.” (NYT)
This is one of the finest public spaces in town, always worth a visit.
National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, Lower Manhattan,
At 2 p.m. / FREE
212-514-3700, nmai.si.edu

Elsewhere, but these look very special, worth the short detour:
“Sakura Matsuri” (ONLY 2 DAYS / April 25-26.)
“The Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s “Sakura Matsuri” (which is Japanese for “Cherry Blossom Festival”) welcomes in spring, with performances and activities under a glorious array of pink and white blossoms. There will be Kabuki dances, taiko drumming, samurai sword fighting, and Japanese standup comedy. New this year is Akim Funk Buddha’s Urban Tea Ceremony, a hip-hop reimagining of the traditional ritual. Other highlights include a “cosplay” fashion show (“cosplay” being a portmanteau of the words “costume” and “play”), a flower-hat dance parade, and workshops in origami, bonsai, and manga drawing.” (NewYorker)
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 990 Washington Avenue, at Eastern Parkway,
subway: #2,3 to Eastern Parkway
10AM – 6PM / $25
For more information, visit bbg.org / 718-623-7200.

Strike!
“The International Street Cannibals and Gleason’s Gym present another round of Strike!, a performance series that combines boxing and chamber music to draw out the subtle kinship of these discipline-heavy pursuits. The musical program contains both contemporary music and classics, such as Bach’s Fugue in F sharp minor and Mozart’s Flute Quartet No. 4 in A.” (NYT)
Gleason’s Gym, 77 Front Street, near Washington Street, Dumbo, Brooklyn,
8PM / $20
718-797-2872, gleasonsgym.net.

BONUS MUSIC PICKS:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are a few of my favorite music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St. joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St. lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd dSt. bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

====================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
====================================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
‘One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North’ (through Sept. 7)
“In the early 20th century, tens of thousands of African Americans left the rural South for the industrial North in search of jobs, homes and respect. Officially, this MoMA show is meant to mark the centennial of that immense population shift, though it also marks another anniversary: the first time in two decades that all 60 paintings in Jacob Lawrence’s great “Migration Series,” now divided between New York and Washington, D.C., have been shown together at the museum. Here they are surrounded by period photographs, books and fabulous music in a display as stimulating to the mind and the ear as it is to the eye. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Cotter)

American Folk Art Museum:
‘When the Curtain Never Comes Down’ (through July 5)
“A sprawling, cacophony of objects, audiotapes, photographs and films is here orchestrated into a curatorial marvel. Strange and wonderful in numerous ways, the show sheds new light on the performance aspects of much outsider art while reminding us how eccentricity is not only basic to creativity but to personal liberty and democracy itself. 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue at 66th Street, 212-595-9533, folkartmuseum.org.” (Roberta Smith)

Museum of Arts and Design:
‘Richard Estes: Painting New York City’ (through Sept. 20)
“The core of this show is a selection of vivid, Photorealist paintings of urban subjects like glass and chrome storefronts, movie theater marquees, cars and trucks, subways, the Brooklyn Bridge, views from the Staten Island Ferry and idyllic images of Central Park made between 1965 and 2015. The exhibition also includes didactic sections about the craft and technique that go into Mr. Estes painting and prints, but that aspect doesn’t fully deliver what it promises. 2 Columbus Circle, Manhattan, 212-299-7777,madmuseum.org.”(Johnson). I LOVE THIS ONE.

Museum of Biblical Art:
timthumb‘Sculpture in the Age of Donatello: Renaissance Masterpieces From Florence Cathedral’ (through June 14) “This terrific 23-piece show features three major works by the early Renaissance sculptor Donatello (1386-1466), including the life-size statue of a bald prophet known as “lo Zuccone” or “Pumpkin Head,” which is widely considered the sculptor’s greatest work. Along with a half-dozen other works by or attributed to Donatello are sculptures by Nanni di Banco (circa 1386-1421), Donatello’s main competitor, including his monumental representation in marble of St. Luke. With the addition of a series of octagonal marble reliefs by Luca della Robbia and wooden models of the Florence Cathedral’s enormous dome attributed to its designer, Filippo Brunelleschi, the exhibition amounts to a tightly cropped snapshot of the birth of the Renaissance. 1865 Broadway, at 61st Street, 212-408-1500, mobia.org.”(Johnson)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 04/23 and 04/21.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (04/24) + Today’s Featured Pub (Tribeca)

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – FRIDAY, APR. 24, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Green Festival (April 24-26)
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 655 W. 34th St., at 11th Ave.
Fri. noon-6 p.m.; Sat. and Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,
single-day pass $12, weekend pass $22, 3-day pass $32;
212-216-2000, greenfestivals.org

Jazz & Colors: The Full Spectrum Edition
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd St.
Sets at 6:00 and 7:30 p.m. / FREE , with pay-what-you-wish museum admission
212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

Peter and Will Anderson
Metropolitan Room, 34 West 22nd Street, Chelsea,
7PM / $22.50
212-206-0440, metropolitanroom.com.

My Night with Philosophers (a 12 hour happening, only in NYCity)
Cultural Services of the French Embassy, 972 Fifth Ave., New York, NY
Ukrainian Institute of America, 2 E. 79th St., New York, NY
FREE and open to the public./ Food and drinks will be available throughout the night.
7PM Fri., Apr. 24, 2015 to 7AM – Sat., Apr. 25, 2015

Elsewhere, but these are two wonderful music halls and worth the detour:
Hurray for the Riff Raff (also Saturday)
Friday at 9 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, near the Bowery, Lower East Side, 800-745-3000, boweryballroom.com.
Saturday at 8:30 p.m., Music Hall of Williamsburg, 66 North Sixth Street, Brooklyn, 800-745-3000, musichallofwilliamsburg.com.

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Green Festival (April 24-26)
“Earth—We’ve only got one (as far as we know). New York may be one of the greenest cities in America—we have the highest percentage of workers who commute by public transportation, bike or foot–but there’s still more individuals could do. Over 300 exhibitors gather at this annual three-day festival to offer eco-friendly services, earth-conscious products and educational demonstrations. There will also be a vast selection of vegetarian, vegan, non-GMO and organic food items available for sale—tasty and good for the environment!” (TONY)
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 655 W. 34th St., at 11th Ave.
Fri. noon-6 p.m.; Sat. and Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,
single-day pass $12, weekend pass $22, 3-day pass $32;
212-216-2000, greenfestivals.org

Jazz & Colors: The Full Spectrum Edition
jazzandcolorsLose yourself at the Met and find dazzling masterpieces of art and jazz.

“This annual Central Park event has moved indoors. It scatters ten jazz ensembles throughout the Met; each group plays repertory masterworks akin to the artworks in the museum’s galleries. The spirit of improvisation that earned jazz the title “the sound of surprise” will be in abundance, with one constant: All the groups, whether swinging, groovy or avant-gardist, will choose from the same repertoire of tunes, among them, Bigard-Ellington’s “Mood Indigo,” Fats Waller’s “Honeysuckle Rose,” Ray Henderson’s “Bye Bye Blackbird,” Miles Davis’s “Blue In Green,” Bronislaw Kaper’s “On Green Dolphin Street,” Thelonious Monk’s “Green Chimneys” and Irving Berlin’s “Blue Skies.” It’s a chance to experience every corner of the museum with its very own jazz soundtrack.” (seniorplanet.org)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd St.
Sets at 6:00 and 7:30 p.m. / FREE with pay-what-you-wish museum admission
212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

Peter and Will Anderson
Anderson-Oct-2014-Promo-41“The 20-something twin wunderkind of the reeds first came to our attention as stars of the emerging neo-hot jazz movement, but their latest efforts take them into wholly new directions. Their new album, “Deja Vu,” which they’ll launch on Friday at the Metropolitan Room, combines the twin titans with an exemplary mainstream modern jazz rhythm section, including the equally precocious piano and bass team of Jeb Patton and David Wong and veteran drummer Tootie Heath.

Then, next week at 59E59 they’ll launch a two week run of what seems to be a soul jazz project, joining Hammond B-3 organist Pat Bianchi, drummer (and “jazz maniac”) Kenny Washington and yet a third saxophone player, the formidable tenor champion Harry Allen.” (WSJ)
Metropolitan Room, 34 West 22nd Street, Chelsea,
7PM / $22.50
212-206-0440, metropolitanroom.com.

My Night with Philosophers (a 12 hour happening, only in NYCity)
banner“The program, presented by Columbia Maison Française and Cultural Services of the French Embassy, gathers 60 eminent philosophers from Europe and the U.S. for a wide array of conferences and discussions. This original all-night format allows one to see and think of philosophy in a different light, to “think philosophy outside the box.” By bringing the event outside of the academic sphere, the goal of the night is to intrigue and surprise the audience by exposing them to works of art which touch upon philosophy and offer singular and unusual answers. The night offers a special programming of live artistic performances as well as film, music and readings of plays by actors.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

Presented at the French Cultural Services and Ukrainian Institute of America landmark mansions, on Fifth Ave. and 79th St.
Cultural Services of the French Embassy, 972 Fifth Ave., New York, NY
Ukrainian Institute of America, 2 E. 79th St., New York, NY
Free and open to the public / Food and drinks will be available throughout the night.
7PM Fri., Apr. 24, 2015 to 7AM – Sat., Apr. 25, 2015

Elsewhere, but these are two wonderful music halls and worth the detour:
Hurray for the Riff Raff (also Saturday)
images-1“An informal leader of the roots music scene in New Orleans, the singer and multi-instrumentalist Alynda Lee Segarra creates intimate, earnest pop yarns with traditional Americana anchoring. Her project Hurray for the Riff Raff released its cool, confident fifth album, “Small Town Heroes,” in Feb. 2014. With Clear Plastic Masks.” (Anderson-NYT)

Alynda Lee Segarra, the leader of this folk-rock ensemble, is from the Bronx, but she ran away as a teen-ager to New Orleans, where she immersed herself in the city’s soulful music scene, honed her chops as a performer, and eventually formed this collective. The band—whose key members, including Segarra, identify as queer and advocate on behalf of the L.G.B.T. community—saw breakthrough success with their fifth album, “Small Town Heroes,” last year. Since then, they have been tirelessly touring, both as a headliner and as a supporting act, though in the case of the latter, it’s easy to imagine them stealing the show. The songs, all effortlessly catchy, shift beautifully from sorrowful to ebullient, and seamlessly fuse elements of doo-wop, country, blues, honky-tonk, and sixties pop.” (NewYorker)
Friday at 9 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, near the Bowery, Lower East Side, 800-745-3000, boweryballroom.com.
Saturday at 8:30 p.m., Music Hall of Williamsburg, 66 North Sixth Street, Brooklyn, 800-745-3000, musichallofwilliamsburg.com.

BONUS JAZZ PICKS:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:
Greenwich Village:
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – 55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. jazz.org/dizzys, 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave), birdlandjazz.com, 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. smokejazz.com, 212-864-6662
Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

====================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
====================================================================================

A PremierPub / Tribeca

B-Flat / 277 Church St. (btw Franklin/White St))

b_flat4There are some places that are tough to find, then add a layer of mystery when you do find them. B-Flat has a nondescript, almost unmarked door at street level – today’s speakeasy vibe. Open this door and you face a dimly lit stairway down to their basement location. It almost takes a leap of faith to follow the stairs down to their interior door.

But open that door and a pleasant surprise awaits you.

It’s a basement jazz spot all right, but not like any traditional jazz joint you may have been to before. This place looks as fresh as today, probably because it’s only been open for 6 years. Even though it hasn’t had a chance to age gracefully, the cherry wood accents and low lighting make this small space very inviting.

There is always jazz, often progressive jazz, playing over their very discrete, stylish bose speakers, setting just the right tone as you find a seat at the bar, or one of the small tables. There is wine and beer available, but this place has some expert mixologists making some very creative cocktails, which I’m told change seasonally, a nice touch.

Come at happy hour and tasty cocktails like the el Diablo or the lychee martini are $8 – not bad. I am a sucker for any drink made with lychee and how can you not try a tequila drink named el Diablo. There is also nice selection of small bites available at happy hour and a food menu that is as innovative as the cocktail menu, so this does not have to be a happy hour only stop.

It wasn’t surprising to find a tasty prosciutto and arugula salad with yuzu dressing, but I did not expect to find such a good version of fried chicken breast on the apps menu. Here it’s called “Tatsuta.” Best bet is to sample happy hour, then dinner on a Monday or Wednesday night, when you can finish with no cover live jazz that starts around 8.

This place is tough to find (look for a small slate sandwich board on the sidewalk out front advertising happy hour) and on some nights when there is no live music it may be a little too quiet for some. But I think it’s worth searching out if you want a place with good music, food, and especially drinks, away from the maddening crowd.

Website: http://http://www.bflat.info/index.html
Phone #: 212-219-2970
Hours: Mo-Wed 5pm-2am; Th-Sat 5pm-3am; no Sun
Happy Hour: 5-7pm every day; $8 cocktails + special prices on apps
Music: Mon/Wed 8pm
Subway: #1 to Franklin; walk E 1 blk to Church; N 1 blk to bFlat

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“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (04/23) + GallerySpecialExhibits: Chelsea

Today’s “Fab 5″+1/ Selected NYCity Events – THURSDAY, APR. 23, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Jennifer Sheehan – Stardust: A Night in the Cosmos
54 Below, 254 W 54th St. (btw Broadway and Eighth Ave)
9:30PM / $25–$65, plus $25 minimum
646-476-3551 / 54below.com.

Converging Lenses: Issues in Contemporary Photography
The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave. (btw 93/92 St.)
6:30PM / FREE during Pay-What-You-Wish Admission, RSVP recommended
212-423-3200

The Jack Quartet performs works by Zorn and others
David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center,
61 W 62 St. (btw Columbus/Broadway Ave.)
7:30PM / FREE Thursdays
212-875-5350 / atrium.lincolncenter.org

Sculpture in the Age of Donatello
Museum of Biblical Art, 1865 Broadway (btw 61/62 St.)
6:30PM / FREE, Reservations are not required but seating is limited
212-408-1500

Photography: From the Archives of Bert Stern (opening reception)
Staley-Wise Gallery, 560 Broadway, (btw Prince/Spring St.)
6:00 pm to 8:00 PM / FREE
staleywise.com

Gilberto Gil, Gilbertos Samba
the Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St.
8:00PM / $65-$95, maybe a tough ticket, may need to stubhub it.
212-840-2824, 800-982-2787, the-townhall-nyc.org.

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Jennifer Sheehan – Stardust: A Night in the Cosmos
“Young, good-looking and very astute, Ms. Sheehan gives you hope. Drawing from a deep well of feeling, she interprets lyrics from the point of view of someone who knows who she is and conveys empathy in a voice that glows with insight.” -The New York Times

Multiple award-winning performer Jennifer Sheehan and her stellar quartet celebrate the beauty, wonder and romance of the night sky in a song-studded 54 Below evening featuring songs as dazzling and diverse as the stars above — including music from Pink Martini, Duke Ellington, Sergio Mendes, Melody Gardot, David Bowie, Joni Mitchell and Kurt Weill, just to name a few!

It’s a celebration of the many ways we come to love the night sky — as wide-eyed children who look up in wonderment, as young lovers who fall under its enchantment, and as star-gazers of all ages who contemplate love and life on this small blue dot in the universe. And, of course, the stars spark our imagination about what lies beyond… so the show also features some fascinating stories about new discoveries about our star-studded cosmos!
54 Below, 254 W 54th St. (btw Broadway and Eighth Ave)
9:30pm / $25–$65, plus $25 minimum
646-476-3551 / 54below.com.

Converging Lenses: Issues in Contemporary Photography
Over the last ten years, approaches to using photography have changed drastically in reaction to new digital imaging technologies and the proliferation of images on the Internet. This panel discussion will focus on interventions in the medium by younger artists such as Lucas Blalock and Talia Chetrit, and how this trend has placed renewed focus on the work of artists, like Barbara Kasten, who laid the foundations for photography’s current moment. Moderated by Chris Wiley, Adjunct Professor at New York University and contributing editor at Frieze.
The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave. (btw 93/92 St.)
6:30pm / FREE during Pay-What-You-Wish Admission, RSVP recommended
212-423-3200

The Jack Quartet performs works by Zorn and others
Presented in collaboration with Lincoln Center’s Great Performers
Program:
CRAWFORD SEEGER: String Quartet “1931”
MISSY MAZZOLI: Death Valley Junction
JASON ECKARDT: Ascension
CAROLINE SHAW: Ritornello 2.sq.2.j
JOHN ZORN: The Alchemist
“Every JACK concert transcends a run-of-the-mill performance and becomes a true event.” — Time Out New York
David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center,
61 W 62 St. (btw Columbus/Broadway Ave.)
at 7:30 / FREE Thursdays
get there early, no later than 7PM, if you want to get in what is a small performance space.
212-875-5350 / atrium.lincolncenter.org

Sculpture in the Age of Donatello:
Dr. David J. Drogin, Fashion Institute of Technology
“Twenty-three masterpieces of early Florentine Renaissance sculpture—most never seen outside Italy—are being exhibited at MOBIA as the centerpiece of the Museum’s tenth anniversary season.

Learn more about Sculpture in the Age of Donatello with engaging and informative lectures by renowned scholars and curators.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

ed. note
The Real Estate monsters have struck again! $300 million bought this fairly new building to be demolished this summer. This is the museum’s last exhibition here and it’s memorable.
Museum of Biblical Art, 1865 Broadway (btw 61/62 St.)
6:30PM / FREE, Reservations are not required but seating is limited and offered on a first-come first-served basis.
212-408-1500

Photography: From the Archives of Bert Stern
Opening Reception
Bert Stern conceived of his ultimate photographic romance with a vivacious woman on his flight to Rome in the spring of 1962. He was at the height of his success, eagerly sought after by art directors and fashion editors, and able to gain access to nearly any celebrity – so why not America’s leading sex symbol, Marilyn Monroe?
Staley-Wise Gallery, 560 Broadway, (btw Prince/Spring St.)
6:00 pm to 8:00 pm / FREE
staleywise.com

Gilberto Gil, Gilbertos Samba
Grammy-winner Gilberto Gil returns to New York for the first time in five years bringing his latest show Gilbertos Samba. The evening features reinterpretations of old classics recorded by João Gilberto and more, featured on Gilberto’s latest CD. New Yorkers will have the opportunity to enjoy the voice of Gilberto Gil, whose career blends with the history and culture of the Brazilian nation. Gil’s illustrious career spans four decades with over 30 albums, multiple Grammy Awards, six gold records, four platinum singles, and more than five million records sold.

“There may have been one man onstage, but there was enough warmth, love, intelligence and sheer talent on display to power an orchestra.” — Variety
“Gil defies his age, becoming if anything more captivating, exuberant, and irreplaceable with each passing year.” —The New Yorker
the Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St.
8PM / $65-$95, maybe a tough ticket, may need to stubhub it.
212-840-2824, 800-982-2787, the-townhall-nyc.org.

========================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
=======================================================================================

Chelsea Art Gallery District*

Chelsea is the heart of the NYCity contemporary art scene. Home to more than 300 art galleries, the Rubin Museum, the Joyce Theater and The Kitchen performance spaces, there is no place like it anywhere in the world. Come here to browse free exhibitions by world-renowned artists and those unknowns waiting to be discovered in an art district that is concentrated between West 18th and West 27th Streets, and 10th and 11th Avenues. Afterwards stop in the Chelsea Market, stroll on the High Line, or rest up at one of the many cafes and bars and discuss the fine art.

Here is a current exhibition that TimeOutNY recommends:
“Santu Mofokeng: A Metaphorical Biography” (through May 23)
Photojournaism becomes art.
image-1“Since 2011, the New York outpost of Germany’s Walther Collection has been an important showcase for modern and contemporary African photography. Case in point: this excellent minisurvey of the work of Santu Mofokeng, titled, “A Metaphorical Biography.” It positions him as both a photojournalist and an artist concerned with questions of meaning and representation. Born in Johannesburg in 1956, Mofokeng began his professional career in the mid-1980s as a member of the photo agency Afrapix. In the turbulent decade leading up to apartheid’s end, he produced photo essays on South African townships, offering a more complex view of their inhabitants’ lives than the coverage found in the global media.

During the 1990s Mofokeng began to collect late-19th- and early-20th-century studio portraits of middle-class black South Africans. These became his 1997 slide show, The Black Photo Album/Look at Me: 1890–1950, in which intertitles provide biographical information on some of the subjects, while also questioning what their real-life experiences might have been.” (Anne Doran)
The Walther Collection, 526 W 26th St. (btw 10/11 ave)
We-Su // 11am-6pm

Here are two current exhibitions that the NYT recommends:
Victor Moscoso: ‘Psychedelic Drawings, 1967 – 1982’ (through April 25)
In the 1960s, Victor Moscoso produced some of the most memorable acid rock posters of the psychedelic revolution in San Francisco. He also contributed trippy strips to Zap Comix, the underground publication founded by R. Crumb. This exhibition offers a tantalizing glimpse back at an unusually euphoric time in the history of graphic design. Along with vintage concert posters, it presents original drawings, collages and surrealistic comic strips dating from 1967 to 1982. Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 10th Avenue, near 18th Street, 212-206-9723, edlingallery.com. (Johnson)

Alison Rossiter: ‘Paper Wait’ (through May 2)
The first part of Alison Rossiter’s process involves acquiring unexposed, expired photographic paper, generally from eBay. Then she pours liquid developer on the paper and exposes it to light. The results are abstract compositions that blur the boundaries between photography and painting. For instance, the series “Latent Eastman Kodak Velox, expired May 1919, processed 2014” employs paper that expired just after World War I. The demise of chemical photography becomes a metaphor for the fate of defeated and exhausted empires, but she also suggests that expired materials have poignant memories and stories to reveal. Yossi Milo Gallery, 245 10th Avenue, near 24th Street, 212-414-0370, www.yossimilo.com. (Martha Schwendener)

For a listing of 25 essential galleries in the Chelsea Art Gallery District, organized by street, which enables you to create your own Chelsea Art Gallery crawl, see the Chelsea Gallery Guide (nycgo.com) Or check out TONY magazine’s list of the “Best Chelsea Galleries” and click through to see what’s on view.

*Now plan your own gallery crawl, but plan your visits for Tuesday through Saturday; most galleries are closed Sunday. and Monday.

TIP: After your gallery tour, stop in Ovest at 513W27th St. for Aperitivo Italiano (Happy Hour on steroids). Discuss all the great art you have viewed over a drink and a very tasty selection of FREE appetizers (M-F, 5-8pm).

=======================================================
For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 04/15 and 04/13.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Selected Events (04/22) + Today’sFeaturedNeighborhood: Upper WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″+1/ Selected NYCity Events – WEDNESDAY, APR. 22, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Mary Chapin Carpenter / Lunasa
the Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St. (btw 5/6 ave)
at 8:00 p.m., / $40-$65
212-840-2824, 800-982-2787, the-townhall-nyc.org.

Inequality and Climate Change: Joseph Stiglitz and Nicholas Stern in Conversation
The Graduate Center CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave., @ 34th St.
at 6:30 pm / FREE
212-817-7000

Swamp Gumbo
B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, Lucille’s Bar & Grill, 237 W42nd St. (btw 7/8)
at 8:00 pm / $18
http://www.bbkingblues.com

The Law of the Land: A Grand Tour of Our Constitutional Republic
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West
at 6:30 pm / $34; $20 member
212-873-3400

Juilliard Organists
Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Ave, at 112th St.
at 7:30 p.m./ FREE
212-799-5000, events.juilliard.edu

Menswear Dog Presents: The New Classics: Fresh Looks for the Modern Man
Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St. (btw Greenwich/West St.)
at 6:00 pm / FREE
212-587-5389

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Mary Chapin Carpenter / Lunasa
MaryChapinWEB_200x0“A thoughtful country-folk chorister whose warm introspection suggests campfires and coffeehouses, Ms. Carpenter is so beloved in Nashville that she was inducted into the city’s Songwriters Hall of Fame. “Songs From the Movie,” a fanciful record that reimagined some of her past works in rich orchestral arrangements, was released last year.” (Anderson-NYT)

Five-time Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter returns to singing both timeless hits and deep cuts from her expansive and beloved 13-album catalog after performing with orchestras in early 2014. Carpenter will be joined on stage by longtime friends Jon Carroll (piano) and John Doyle (guitars, bouzouki).

Over the course of her career, Carpenter has sold over 13 million records. With hits like “Passionate Kisses” and “He Thinks He’ll Keep Her,” she has won five Grammy Awards (with 15 nominations), two CMA awards and two Academy of Country Music awards for her vocals. Her songs speak to the most personal of life’s details and the most universal.

Named for an ancient Celtic harvest festival in honor of the Irish god Lugh, patron of the arts, Lúnasa is indeed a gathering of some of the top musical talents in Ireland. Its members have helped form the backbone of some of the greatest Irish groups of the decade. At 8 p.m., / $40-$65
the Town Hall, 123 West 43rd St. (btw 5/6 ave)
212-840-2824, 800-982-2787, the-townhall-nyc.org.

Inequality and Climate Change: Joseph Stiglitz and Nicholas Stern in Conversation
Joseph-Stiglitz-Nicholas-SternOn Earth Day 2015, Joseph Stiglitz and Nicholas Stern, two leading experts on economics and the environment, join in conversation about the intersection of climate change and inequality. Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate, is university professor at Columbia and author of the forthcoming book The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do about Them. Stern – a professor at the London School of Economics, president of the British Academy, and a member of the House of Lords – wrote the forthcoming Why Are We Waiting? The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change.

Co-sponsored by the Luxembourg Income Study Center, the Advanced Research Collaborative, and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.
The Graduate Center CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave., @ 34th St.
6:30pm / FREE
212-817-7000

Swamp Gumbo
1535With their musical mix of Cajun zydeco, jazz and R&B, the members of Swamp Gumbo create a New Orleans-style party atmosphere wherever they play. Up front is lead singer Ms. Kati Mac, who has sung with the talents to five Emmy-nominated songs. On trumpet is Tim Ouimette, who has played for The Count Basie Orchestra, Keith Richards and They Might Be Giants. Swamp Gumbo also features Mr. Cobert, whose credits include work with this performance the band will be joined by bassist Steve Count, singer/songwriter Sherryl Marshall and Denny McDermott on drums, as they play hits from artists like Dr. John, The Neville Brothers, Professor Longhair, Allen Toussaint and more.
B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, Lucille’s Bar & Grill, 237 W42nd St. (btw 7/8)
8:00PM / $18
http://www.bbkingblues.com

The Law of the Land: A Grand Tour of Our Constitutional Republic
“As cases such as Brown v. Board of Education demonstrate, laws and legal debates affecting the entire nation arise from distinctive local settings. Renowned scholar Akhil Reed Amar sheds new light on America’s constitutional landscape by exploring how the nation’s legal tradition unites a vast and disparate land.

imgresAkhil Reed Amar, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University, is the author of America’s Constitution: A Biography and America’s Unwritten Constitution. His most recent book is The Law of the Land: A Grand Tour of Our Constitutional Republic. Trevor W. Morrison (moderator) is Dean and Eric M. and Laurie B. Roth Professor of Law at New York University School of Law.” (ThoughtGallery.org)
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West
at 6:30 pm / $34; $20 member
212-873-3400

Juilliard Organists
c3069d7e43e99a40c0e5d820e6cb17dfJuilliard presents this organ recital as part of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine’s Great Music in a Great Space series. The students, under the direction of the organ department’s chairman, Paul Jacobs, will perform works such as the “Andante espressivo” from Elgar’s Sonata in G, Op. 28, and a transcription of selections from Grieg’s “Holberg Suite,” Op. 40.
Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Ave, at 112th St.
At 7:30 p.m./ FREE
212-799-5000, events.juilliard.edu

Menswear Dog Presents: The New Classics: Fresh Looks for the Modern Man
aclkThis evening we welcome David Fung and Yena Kim and Bodhi. They are the creative force behind the wildly popular Menswear Dog blog. They join us to discuss their new book Menswear Dog Presents.
Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St. (btw Greenwich/West St.)
6pm / FREE
212-587-5389

BONUS JAZZ PICKS:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:
Greenwich Village:
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South — villagevanguard.com / 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. — bluenotejazz.com / 212-475-8592
55 Bar – 55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. — 55bar.com / 212-929-9883
Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662
Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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A PremierPub / Upper West Side

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que / 700 W125th St. @ 12th ave.

Walk only five minutes from the 125th St. station on the #1 line to find this authentic honky-tonk barbecue joint. Some folks think Dinosaur is just a place to eat ribs. Au contraire. With 24 carefully selected taps, this is a place to drink beer, and eat ribs.

HarlHostStandNo food goes better with American craft ales than American barbecue. Dinosaur may be the best combo of good beer drinking and hearty eating in town, which makes the trip uptown to West Harlem totally worthwhile.

This second incarnation of Dinosaur in Harlem is in a two story, old brick warehouse near the Hudson River. Don’t let that run down exterior fool you. Inside it’s a large space with huge, rough wooden columns and unfinished wooden floors and brick walls – just right for a bbq joint. As soon as you open the front door you are hit with that tantalizing aroma of barbecue coming from the large open kitchen. Reminds me of those great rib joints I frequented when stationed in North Carolina all those years ago. If your stomach wasn’t grumbling before, it is now.

Head to the bar, sit down and try to decide on a beer. It’s not an easy decision – a good problem to have. This is a pretty damn good beer list to choose from, one that most beer bars should be jealous of. I love that they feature NY craft beers. You may want to try the four beer sampler, which is always fun, and in this place may be necessary.

The blues music playing in the background will get you in the mood for their North Carolina style barbecue, and even when it’s a full house your order shouldn’t take too long (assuming you snagged a table). The food is all slow smoked, so it’s already mostly done and ready to go. I always start with an order of their giant, spice rubbed wings, so good they may make you give up Buffalo wings.

Unfortunately, a place this good does not fly under the radar. There can be some long waits for a table at dinnertime. So you need a strategy – avoid prime time, and try not to arrive with your entire posse, which will limit your seating options.

A seat at the bar, a small table in the bar area, or in the summer, an outside table underneath what’s left of the elevated West Side Highway, all may open before a table inside the main dining room. Otherwise, try Dinosaur for lunch, or come very late for dinner, maybe after a show at the nearby Cotton Club nightclub.

Website: http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/
Phone #: 212-694-1777
Hours: Mo-Th 11:30am-11:00pm; Fr-Sa 11:30am-12:00am;
Su 12:00pm-10:00pm
Happy Hour: 4-7pm every day; $1 off all drinks
Music: Fri / Sat 10:30pm
Subway: #1 to 125th St.
Walk 2 blk W on 125th St. to Dinosaur Bar-B-Q,
just past the elevated highway.

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“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
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Selected Events (04/21) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – TUESDAY, APR. 21, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”   

Nicholas Payton  –  Jazz    (9:30pm)

The Great Street Meet  –  Food & Drink    (6:30pm) 

Tribeca Talks: Secrecy and Power  – SmartStuff/ Conversation   (6:30pm)

Barry Harris Trio –  Jazz    (8:30pm)     (10:30pm) 

A Discussion with Renata Adler  –  SmartStuff/ Book Talk   (7pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Apr.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Nicholas Payton (also April 22)
search“The trumpeter travels light these days, accompanied only by a bassist and a drummer. His time as a staunch traditionalist long over, Payton is now stylistically ecumenical, and he regularly spikes his fervent post-bop turns with spirited R. & B. and funk grooves.“ (NewYorker)
Smalls, 183 W.10th St. (btw W4th/7th Ave S)
9:30pm / $20
212-252-5091.

The Great Street Meet
image-2“The Street Vendor Project celebrates the variety of New York’s outdoor food vendors from across all five boroughs. Enjoy an evening of quick meals then salute Yonah Schimmel’s 115-year-old Knish Bakery that started on the streets.” (TONY)

Judson Memorial Church, 55 Washington Sq South, at Thompson St.
6:30pm. / $35-$500.
streetvendor.org

Tribeca Talks: Secrecy and Power
If knowledge is power then secrets are weapons. Secrets have always fueled great stories, but what happens when our secrets are breached in real-life? Join former spy Valerie Plame, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Bart Gellman, We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks director Alex Gibney, The Ethical Hacker, and moderator Cynthia McFadden of NBC News as they explore this timely topic.
School Visual Arts Theater, 1 Silas, 333 W23rd St. (btw 8/9 Ave)
6:30PM / $38.50

Barry Harris Trio (through April 26)
images-1“The pianist Barry Harris belongs to a generation that carried bebop’s torch into an uncertain future. He’s a figure of twinkly erudition, a natural pedagogue as well as an artist, and he has deep history with his trio mates, Ray Drummond on bass and Leroy Williams on drums.” (Chinen-NYT)

Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village,
At 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. / $30
212-255-4037, villagevanguard.com.

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:
A Discussion with Renata Adler
image-2“Don’t miss a rare chance to see the illustrious novelist and journalist in person as she launches her much-anticipated new book of collected nonfiction.

To the joy of fans around the world, NYRB Classics is finally publishing the collected nonfiction of this incomparable Italian-American author and critic. Adler herself makes an appearance to read from and sign copies of “After the Tall Timber.” (TONY)
Book Court, 163 Court St. (btw Dean and Pacific Sts), Boerum Hill, Bklyn
subway: F to Bergen St.; walk 1 blk W on Wyckoff St., 2 blk N on Court St.
7pm. / FREE.

====================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 56 million visitors last year and is TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2015.  Quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Metropolitan Museum of Art:
‘Reimagining Modernism: 1900-1950’ (continuing)
One of the greatest encyclopedic museums in the world fulfills its mission a little more with an ambitious reinstallation of works of early European modernism with their American counterparts for the first time in nearly 30 years. Objects of design and paintings by a few self-taught artists further the integration. It is quite a sight, with interesting rotations and fine-tunings to come. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Smith)

‘The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky’ (through May 10)
Some of the earliest surviving art by native North Americans left America long ago. Soldiers, traders and priests, with magpie eyes for brilliant things, bundled it up and shipped it across the sea to Europe. Painted robes, embroidered slippers and feathered headdresses tinkling with chimes found their way into cupboards in 18th-century London and Paris, and lay there half-forgotten. Now, with the arrival at the Met of this traveling show, some of those wondrous things — truly world masterpieces — have come home in an exhibition context that carries the Native American story from 100 B.C. into the 21st century. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Cotter)

‘Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklanski Selects From The Met Collection’ (through June 14) Complementing the survey of his photographs, the artist has orchestrated 80 works from the museum’s holdings — along with a few of his own — into a mesmerizing display meditating on sex and death. Consisting mostly of photographs, it is bolstered by paintings by Dali and Cranach sculptures from several cultures and several surprises. Scratch any artist of note, even a post-modern one, and you often find a connoisseur. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Smith)

‘Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklanski Photographs’ (through Aug. 16)
A small but succinct survey of the multimedia bad-boy artist’s polymorphous relationship to photography shows him constantly changing scale, film and printing methods while exploring the medium’s ability to startle, seduce and become generic. He appropriates, imitates and pays homage as he goes, regularly invoking his Polish roots. Don’t miss the large photo-banners in the museum’s Great Hall or the massive fiber-sculpture monument to the eye and to insatiable looking. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Smith)

Neue Galerie:
‘Egon Schiele: Portraits’ (through Sept. 07)
zakovsek_1“Of the approximately 125 items in this terrific show, there are only 11 oil paintings, which is a good thing. Except for a large picture of his wife, Edith, in a colorful striped dress, Schiele’s works on canvas are dark and turgid. But his drawings are nimble and nuanced. Working on paper with pencil, charcoal, ink, gouache, watercolor and crayons, he portrayed himself and others with infectious avidity. There’s hardly a single sheet here that doesn’t warrant close looking for its virtuoso draftsmanship and psychological acuity. 1048 Fifth Avenue, at 86th Street, 212-628-6200, neuegalerie.org. “(Johnson)

Guggenheim Museum:
Guggenheim Museum: ‘On Kawara — Silence’ (through May 3)
The first retrospective of this Conceptual Art giant turns the museum’s spiral into a vortex suffused with the consciousness of time, life’s supreme ruler, in all its quotidian daily unfoldings, historical events and almost incomprehensible grandeur. The presentation of date paintings, “I Got Up” postcards and “I AM Still Alive” telegrams echoes Mr. Kawara’s exquisite sense of discipline and craft. This is an extraordinary tribute. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org. (Smith)

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901–1911 (through spring 2015)
ex_Kandinsky_Landscape-near-Murnau-with-Locomotive_490Early in his career Vasily Kandinsky experimented with printmaking, produced brightly-colored landscapes of the German countryside, and explored recognizable and recurrent motifs. This intimate exhibition drawn from the Guggenheim collection explores the artist’s representational origins.

El Museo del Barrio:
‘Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa, Art and Film’ (through June 27)
Painting with light is one way to define the cinematographer’s task, and it describes the art of Gabriel Figueroa (1907-1997), who worked with some of the leading international film directors of his time and was a national hero in his native Mexico, the supreme painter-in-light of Mexicanidad. How do you put this particular kind of art across in a museum — art that is as much about time as it is about material, as much about flux as it is about fixity? This show, which mixes Figueroa film clips with paintings and prints by some of Mexico’s greatest artists and in the process utterly transforms El Museo’s interior spaces, gives an enthralling answer. 1230 Fifth Avenue, at 104th Street, East Harlem, 212-831-7272, elmuseo.org. (Cotter)

Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum (continuing):
rendering-3The stately doors of the 1902 Andrew Carnegie mansion, home to the Cooper Hewitt, are open again after an overhaul and expansion of the premises. Historic house and modern museum have always made an awkward fit, a standoff between preservation and innovation, and the problem remains, but the renovation has brought a wide-open new gallery space, a cafe and a raft of be-your-own-designer digital enhancements. Best of all, more of the museum’s vast permanent collection is now on view, including an Op Art weaving, miniature spiral staircases, ballistic face masks and a dainty enameled 18th-century version of a Swiss knife. Like design itself, this institution is built on tumult and friction, and you feel it. 2 East 91st Street, at Fifth Avenue, 212-849-8400, cooperhewitt.org. (Cotter)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Ten museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:

• 110th Street – Museum for African Art

• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio

• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York

• 92nd Street – The Jewish Museum

• 91st Street – Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

• 89th Street – National Academy Museum

• 88th Street – Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

• 86th Street – Neue Galerie New York

• 83rd Street – Goethe-Institut

Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
• 82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Additionally, though technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th St. and the The Morgan Library & Museum on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave. Now plan your own museum crawl. ========================================================

For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 04/19 and 04/17.
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