Selected Events (03/02) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – MONDAY, MAR. 02, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

NYC Restaurant Week  –  Food & Drink  (various times)   

Captain Black Big Band   –   Jazz   (7pm)  (9pm)     

The Breithaupt Brothers and Special Guests  –  Cabaret   (7pm)   

The Untold Stories of Broadway  –  SmartStuff/ Book Talk   (6pm)  

T Blues Band  —  Blues Music     (10pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

NYC Restaurant Week (through Mar. 6)
The semi-annual dining extravaganza is back (actually it started Feb.16), with more than 300 area restaurants offering three courses for lunch at $25 and dinner at $38. Here are some suggestions to get you started on some fine dining:

The top 10 restaurants for NYC Restaurant Week Winter 2015
“With all of those choices, where do you start? We’ve nailed down 10 must-try restaurants, including nouveau Italian numbers, a Chinatown update and a Southern-comfort joint offering some of the best fried chicken in the city.” (TONY)

“20 Restaurant Week Reservations to Make Right Now” (Zagat)
For more information, a complete list of restaurants, and to make reservations: nycgo.com

Captain Black Big Band, Conducted by Orrin Evans
Captain_Black_Big_Band“Orrin Evans, a Philly pianist who approaches the jazz tradition with both reverence and a deep inquisitiveness, leads his fine, large ensemble, which translates postbop fire to the big-band canvas. Witness Mother’s Touch, a bravura recent Posi-Tone set that divides its time between soulful reflection and high-wire dazzlement.” (TONY)
Smoke Jazz Club and Lounge, 2751 Broadway, btw 105th and 106th St.
7pm + 9pm / $9

The Breithaupt Brothers and Special Guests
imgres“No composer had the chutzpah to write a tune called “Songs for Swingin’ Lovers”—until the Breithaupt Brothers. This team of songwriting siblings might be viewed as Canada’s male answer to New York’s Marcy Heisler and Zina Goldrich, in that not only do they write high-quality original songs in a wide range of styles, but they have a knack for assembling first-rate casts of jazz and theater singers to perform them.

At their showcase last September at Joe’s Pub, fellow Canadian Paul Shaffer (yes, David Letterman ’s sidekick) stole the show, and this time there’s an even more celestial lineup, including the impeccable blues stylist Catherine Russell, the increasingly impressive interpreter Marissa Mulder, Matthew Saldivar from “Honeymoon in Vegas” and Steely Dan’s Carolyn Leonhart. “ (WSJ)
Birdland, 315 W. 44th St.,
7PM / $25
(212) 581-3080

The Untold Stories of Broadway
“The musical theater historian Jennifer Ashley Tepper discusses her book series “The Untold Stories of Broadway,” a look behind the curtain of some of the Great White Way’s most widely known shows. She will receive help from Broadway veterans like Baayork Lee of “A Chorus Line,” Jose Llana of “Here Lies Love” and Taylor Trensch of “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” and “Matilda.” Ms. Tepper will sign books before the event, at 5:30 p.m.” (NYT)
NYPL for the Performing Arts, 111 Amsterdam Avenue, at 65th Street, Lincoln Center,
At 6 p.m. / FREE
917-275-6975, nypl.org/lpa

T Blues Band
Comprised of rotating band leaders, the T Blues Band is a sound-shifting, blues machine. Tight knit groups of 4 musicians combine forces to generate the most powerful and authentic blues incarnations around. Sit back, and enjoy! It’s an experience you can’t find anywhere else but Terra Blues, one of the best Blues bars in New York.
Terra Blues, 149 Bleecker St., btw thompson street & laguardia place
10pm / $10 cover before 10 each night
212.777.7776

==============================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
===============================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
107508‘The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’ (through March 22) In his printed works, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec chronicled and publicized the music halls, theaters, circuses, operas and cafes of Paris with terrific verve, sly wit and surprising subtlety. This enthralling show presents approximately 100 examples drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Johnson)

‘The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World’(through April 5) Despite being predictable and market-oriented in its choice of 17 artists, this museum’s first painting survey in decades is well worth seeing. About half the artists are exceptional and the rest are represented by their best work. Based on the premise that all historical painting styles are equally available today, the exhibition has been smartly installed to juxtapose different approaches: figurative and abstract, digital and handmade, spare and opulent. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

New-York Historical Society:
‘Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein’ (through April 19) Almost 50 years ago, the picture editor of a campus newspaper at City College of New York assigned himself a breaking story: coverage of what promised to be a massive march in Alabama, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to demand free-and-clear voting rights for African-Americans. On short notice the editor, Stephen Somerstein, grabbed his cameras, climbed on a bus, and headed south. The 55 pictures of black leaders and everyday people in this show, installed in a hallway and small gallery, are some that he shot that day. The image of Dr. King’s head seen in monumental silhouette that has become a virtual logo of the film “Selma” is based on a Somerstein original. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Cotter)

Rubin Museum of Art:
‘The All-Knowing Buddha: A Secret Guide’ (through April 13) This show presents 54 paintings that illustrate step-by-step instructions for followers of Tibetan Buddhism. Delicately painted on 10-by-10-inch paper sheets, most of the pages depict a monk having fabulous visions in a verdant landscape. Thought to have been commissioned by a Mongolian patron and executed by unidentified artists in a Chinese workshop sometime in the 18th century, it is a fascinating and remarkably thorough manual for seekers of higher consciousness. 150 West 17th Street, Chelsea, 212-620-5000,rubinmuseum.org. (Johnson)

=======================================================
For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 02/28 and 02/26.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (03/01) + Today’s Featured Neighborhood: Midtown West

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – SUNDAY, MAR. 01, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Rink–Sporting Life (8am-10pm)   

David Berkman and the New York Standards Quartet   
Jazz   (7pm)  (9pm)  (10:30pm)   

Robert Glasper    –  Jazz    (8:30pm)   (10:30pm)  

Natasha Leggero  –  Comedy   (7:30pm)  

7 Days of Genius Festival  —  SmartStuff/ Discussions & Seminars   (various)
including: The Long Life, Genius or Nightmare  —  SmartStuff/ Discussion   (5pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Rink (Last Day!)
imgres“It may not seem like it, but winter will be over faster than you think. Proof of that is today is the very last day of Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Rink.

Bryant Park’s 17,000-square-foot outdoor rink is free and open late. Don’t get too excited—the admission may be gratis, but you’ll have to shell out $19 to rent skates (or BYO). Still, it’s a veritable winter wonderland: After your time on the ice, warm up at spacious rinkside restaurant Celsius. If you want to practice your lutzes and axels with ample spinning room, try visiting during off-peak hours.” (TONY)
Bryant Park, 6th ave (btw 40/42 St.)
8am -10pm / FREE, if you BYOSkates, otherwise $19
wintervillage.org

David Berkman and the New York Standards Quartet
imgres-1“Mr. Berkman, a pianist and composer with a smart, uncluttered approach to modern jazz, has led his New York Standards Quartet on and off for the better part of a decade; he formally introduced the group last year with the album “The New Straight Ahead.” For a weekend run, he welcomes two notable interlopers, the trombonist Robin Eubanks and the bassist Ray Drummond.” (Nate Chinen- NYT)
Smoke Jazz Club, 2751 Broadway, at 106th St.
At 7, 9 and 10:30 p.m.,
212-864-6662, smokejazz.com.

Robert Glasper (through March 1)
imgres“The pianist’s last two albums, “Black Radio,” from 2012, and “Black Radio 2,” from 2013, hit a nerve with the public (the first won a Grammy for Best R. & B. album). These best-selling (for jazz, that is) recordings blended post-bop jazz, hip-hop, rock, and R. & B. and spoke to the postmodern leanings of contemporary listeners. Guest vocalists assisted in that effort on the albums, but at the Village Vanguard, Glasper is scaling back with his restlessly interactive trio, an instrumental setting that will also allow the leader’s rousing playing to take the spotlight.” (NewYorker)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St.
8:30pm + 10:30 pm / $30
212-255-4037 / villagevanguard.com
Remember, the Vanguard will celebrate it’s 80th Anniversary the week of March 10.

Natasha Leggero
image“Leggero first pulls you in with her seductive charm like a snotty version of Audrey Hepburn, then hilariously trashes everything in her path with her quick wit.

Wearing evening gloves and casting seductive glances, this stand-up projects an air of Audrey Hepburn or Jackie O; her act, however, quickly punctures that veneer. She slings mud at the innumerable plebeians she encounters, but audiences forgive her assault on the easy targets when under the sway of her assured, snotty authority.” (TONY)
Carolines on Broadway, 1626 Broadway (btw 49/50 St.)
7:30pm / $15–$35 plus two-drink minimum

Elsewhere, but this looks almost necessary, and certainly worth the detour:
7 Days of Genius Festival: Venture Into the Extraordinary (through March 8)
“This festival brings together luminaries from a variety of fields — including science, art, religion, business and literature — to discuss the concept of genius and all that goes with it. On Wednesday at 8 p.m., for example, the economist Thomas Piketty joins Paul Krugman, a Nobel laureate and columnist for The New York Times, and Joseph Stiglitz, also a Nobel winner. Other speakers include Cardinal Timothy Dolan and Rabbi Peter J. Rubinstein (Tuesday at 8:15 p.m.), as well as a panel of MacArthur Fellowship recipients (Wednesday at 8:15 p.m.).
The complete lineup is at 92y.org/genius.” (NYT)

Tonight (5pm -7pm):
Roundtable: “The Long Life, Genius or Nightmare” with Ezekiel J. Emanuel
“Late last year, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel (pictured) created a firestorm of controversy with his Atlantic magazine article, “Why I Hope to Die at 75” (a sensational title for a piece in which the doctor proclaimed his wish not to use modern medicine to keep him ticking past the three-quarter century mark). Tonight, Emanuel is joined by James Kirkland, David Sinclair and Jay Olshansky for a discussion of longevity as desire and reality. (Read our Q&A with Olshansky here.)
Click here for tickets; enter the promo code VITA at ticket checkout (the discount is offered by the American Federation of Aging Research, AFAR).” (seniorplanet.org)
92nd St Y, 1395 Lexington Ave
5pm / $30; FREE with promo code: VITA
subway: 4, 5, 6 to 86th St; 6 to 96th St.
92y.org/Event/The-Long-Life-Genius-or-Nightmare

========================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
========================================================================

A PremierPub / Midtown West.

Russian Vodka Room / 265 W 52nd St (btw 7th/8th ave)

Sure, you could travel to Minsk or even Brighton Beach, for an authentic Russian experience, but why bother. On those days when you feel you must wash down your dish of kasha with a few glasses of icy, cold vodka, the Russian Vodka Room will definitely satisfy your urge.

From the outside this place looks a bit drab, and with no windows, a bit mysterious. Midtown tourists walk right by on their way to see “Jersey Boys”, just down the block.

lThose in the know enter a secret hideaway, a dimly lit front room with soft jazz playing – a perfect spot for an illicit late-night rendezvous, or maybe a meet-up with your Russian spy handler, but that’s later in the evening. Early in the evening the large U-shaped bar fills with the after work happy hour crowd, a group made very happy by the much reduced prices.

Their website says: “Welcome Comrades”. Of course, this welcome focuses on dozens of different vodkas, including their own special infusions, which marinate in giant, clear glass jugs visible around the room. The large vodka martinis ensure that you won’t confuse this place with your mother’s Russian Tea Room.

But man does not live by vodka alone. Eat some food, especially the tapa like appetizers. Be decadent and try the cheese blintzes with chocolate, or try a main dish like beef stroganoff with kasha.

Your best bet is to go on a night when the piano man is playing. This guy, who looks like he has eaten a lot of those cheese blintzes, plays five nights a week from 7 to 12 (no Mondays and Thursdays). When the piano man is playing American pop tunes, and you are at the crowded, dimly lit bar testing the horseradish infused vodka, that’s when the RVR shines.

It’s the kind of place where the noise gets louder and the crowd gets happier as the happy hour goes on. I’m generally a beer guy, but I like to come here with a group of friends. We find a table in the back room near the piano man; we eat, and we drink vodka ‘till it hurts (and it will hurt).

========================================================

Website: http://www.russianvodkaroom.com/
Phone #: 212-307-5835
Hours: 4pm-2am; Fri-Sun closes 4am (that could be trouble)
Happy Hour: 4-7pm every day
$4 shots infused vodka (2oz), $5 cosmos; $4 czech draft beer
Music: FR-SU; TU-WE / 7pm-12am
Subway: #1 to 50th St.
Walk 2 blk N. on B’way to 52nd St.; 1 blk W. to RVR
Confusingly, the Russian Samovar is right across the street, on the S. side of 52nd St.
The RVR, your destination, is on the N. side of 52nd St.
Update: music now includes a sax player with a younger, trimmer piano man. “tiny” we miss you.

===========================================================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
===========================================================================================
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (02/28) + GallerySpecialExhibits: Chelsea

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – SATURDAY, FEB. 28, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

The Mozart-Beethoven Connection   –  Classical Music    (2:30pm)   

Monk in Motion – Adam O’Farrill  —  Jazz    (7:30pm)    

Andy Bey    –  Jazz    (7:30pm)   (9:30pm)  

Music for Brunelleschi’s Dome  –  Classical Music   (6pm)  

Stile Antico: From The Imperial Court  —  Choral Music   (8pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

The Mozart-Beethoven Connection
Presented by the Con Brio Ensemble
Featuring violinist Paul Roczek, cellist Hamilton Berry, baritone Darian Worrell, and pianist Diana Mittler-Battipaglia.
NYPL for the Performing Arts, Bruno Walter Auditorium
2:30pm / FREE
The Library for the Performing Arts is proud to offer free admission to programs on a first come, first served basis. Admission lines form one hour prior to each program.

Monk in Motion – Adam O’Farrill
Brooklyn native Adam O’Farrill is the grandson to legendary Afro-Cuban composer and arranger Chico O’Farrill. His father is pianist and bandleader Arturo O’Farrill. Adam won the ASCAP Herb Albert Young Jazz Composer Award and the ASCAP Gerswhin Award. Adam co-leads the O’Farrill Brothers Band with his brother, Zack, and has released two albums, Giant Peach and Sensing Flight. Adam O’Farrill will perform with his combo “Stranger Days” which includes Chad Lefkowitz-Brown (tenor sax), Stephan Crump (bass) and Zack O’Farrill (drums).

Monk-in-Motion: The Next Face of Jazz presents the top three winners of the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition.
Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St.
7:30pm / $25
212-220-1459

Andy Bey
“With his magnificent two most recent albums — “The World According to Andy Bey,” from 2013, and “Pages From an Imaginary Life,” from last year — Mr. Bey has consolidated his rare gifts as a jazz singer of deep patience and extravagant feeling, and a songwriter of intuitive mystery. He had a successful solo engagement at Minton’s near the end of last year, which makes this a repeat performance, though not necessarily a predictable one.” (Chinen-NYT)
Minton’s, 206 West 118th Street, Harlem,
At 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.,
212-243-2222, mintonsharlem.com.

Music for Brunelleschi’s Dome
The completion of The Duomo of Florence in 1436 marked a milestone in architectural history, while the structure later served as a focal point for several great composers.

Lucia Baldacci, organist of the Duomo of Florence, offers a recital of works associated with Brunelleschi’s architectural masterpiece. Repertoire will include works of Dufay, Frescobaldi, Zipoli, and others.

The concert will be preceded at 6pm by a lecture on Donatello and his context in Florentine Art History by Dr. Giovanni Matteo Guidetti, Art Historian and Guide to the City of Florence.
Christ and St. Stephen’s Church, 122 West 69th St.
6pm / $35

Stile Antico: From The Imperial Court
Whether they’re performing at the BBC Proms or alongside rock icon Sting, the members of Stile Antico fuse rich expressivity with technical prowess that “never disappoints” (The Guardian). These masterful interpreters of Renaissance choral music return to Miller with a program that captures triumphs and tragedies from the Imperial courts of the Hapsburgs. Across the generations, in times of peace, victory, and sorrow, the era’s finest composers echoed the majesty of royal life with elegant and richly textured works.
Church of St. Mary the Virgin, 145 West 46th St. (btw 6th and 7th ave)
8:00pm / $35 – $50

====================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
====================================================================================

Chelsea is the heart of the NYCity contemporary art scene. Home to more than 300 art galleries, the Rubin Museum, the Joyce Theater and The Kitchen performance spaces, there is no place like it anywhere in the world. Come here to browse free exhibitions by world-renowned artists and those unknowns waiting to be discovered in an art district that is concentrated between West 18th and West 27th Streets, and 10th and 11th Avenues. Afterwards stop in the Chelsea Market, stroll on the High Line, or rest up at one of the many cafes and bars and discuss the fine art.

Here are a few current exhibition that TimeOutNY recommends:

Claudia Comte, No Melon No Lemon (until March 21, 2015)
imagesThis Swiss artist installs her elegant neomodernist sculptures within equally elegant environments consisting of neomodern paintings and wallpaper patterns. Her work visually name-checks the greats—Brancusi, Noguchi, Moore, Stella, Noland—unapologetically while bringing an added dose of rich, optically buzzy formalism to the proceedings.
Gladstone Gallery, 530 W 21st St.

Alec Soth, “Songbook” (through Mar. 21)
“The photographer takes a road trip through the heartland with black-and-white images of people (some posing formally for portraits, others caught candidly) and landscapes, all with the aim of capturing the “American community.”
Sean Kelly Gallery, Hudson Yards 475 Tenth Ave. (btw 36th/37th St.)
Tu-Sa // 11am-6pm

“Vis-à-vis” (last day)
“Oakland’s Creative Growth Art Center—which “serves adult artists with developmental, mental and physical disabilities”—has become something like Yale’s MFA program for outsider artists, grooming talents whose works are art-world–ready (the most famous example being Judith Scott, currently the subject of a Brooklyn Museum retrospective). This group show mixes CGAC contributors with insider artists, putting them on an equal footing with the likes of Huma Bhabha and Willem de Kooning (!). The results are as inside-out as they are outside-in.”
Andrew Edlin Gallery

“Santu Mofokeng: A Metaphorical Biography” (through May 23)
Photojournaism becomes art.
image-1“Since 2011, the New York outpost of Germany’s Walther Collection has been an important showcase for modern and contemporary African photography. Case in point: this excellent minisurvey of the work of Santu Mofokeng, titled, “A Metaphorical Biography.” It positions him as both a photojournalist and an artist concerned with questions of meaning and representation. Born in Johannesburg in 1956, Mofokeng began his professional career in the mid-1980s as a member of the photo agency Afrapix. In the turbulent decade leading up to apartheid’s end, he produced photo essays on South African townships, offering a more complex view of their inhabitants’ lives than the coverage found in the global media.

During the 1990s Mofokeng began to collect late-19th- and early-20th-century studio portraits of middle-class black South Africans. These became his 1997 slide show, The Black Photo Album/Look at Me: 1890–1950, in which intertitles provide biographical information on some of the subjects, while also questioning what their real-life experiences might have been.” (Anne Doran)
The Walther Collection, 526 W 26th St. (btw 10/11 ave)
We-Su // 11am-6pm

For a listing of 25 essential galleries in the Chelsea Art Gallery District, organized by street, which enables you to create your own Chelsea Art Gallery crawl, see the Chelsea Gallery Guide (nycgo.com) Or check out TONY magazine’s list of the “Best Chelsea Galleries” and click through to see what’s on view. Now plan your own gallery crawl.

TIP: After your gallery tour, stop in Ovest at 513W27th St. for Aperitivo Italiano (Happy Hour on steroids). Discuss all the great art you have viewed over a drink and a tasty selection of FREE appetizers (M-F, 5-8pm).

=======================================================
For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 02/26 and 02/24.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (02/27) + Today’s Featured Neighborhood: Times Square/ Theater District

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – FRIDAY, FEB. 27, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

Paolo Szot   –  Cabaret   (7pm)   

Becoming The Man in the White Suit: The Tom Wolfe Papers  —  
SmartStuff/ Gallery Exhibition    (10am-60pm)    

Harlem Opera Theater: Salute to Black History Month   –  
Opera   (6pm)  

Dr. John  —  Jazz/Blues Music   (8pm)  

Lincoln Center’s College Cabaret  —  Cabaret   (7pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Paolo Szot (also Saturday)
artistpage_paulo1“In 1967, the breakthrough album “Sinatra-Jobim” provided many North Americans with their first prolonged exposure to the undulating rhythms of the bossa nova and the exquisite compositions of Antônio Carlos Jobim. Roughly 20 years later, that same album provided a young Brazilian singer with his own first exposure to the high style and epic canon of Frank Sinatra.

Paolo Szot, who grew up to become one of the most exceptional baritones of his generation both on Broadway and at the Metropolitan Opera, celebrates that moment of discovery (on both sides) as well as the Sinatra centennial with this opulent program of songs from that amazing collaboration. Most of the songs (”The Girl from Ipanema,” “Corcovado”) are very familiar, but it’s safe to say that no one has sung them as lushly romantically since the Chairman himself.” (WSJ)
54 Below, 254 W. 54th St.
7pm / $50-$80
(646) 476-3551

“Becoming The Man in the White Suit: The Tom Wolfe Papers”
exhibition_flyer“Today is the final day of the New York Public Library’s “Becoming The Man in the White Suit: The Tom Wolfe Papers,” an exhibition featuring highlights from the archive of author, journalist, and cultural commentator Tom Wolfe.” (dnainfo.com)
NYPL, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, McGraw Rotunda, Fifth Avenue at 42nd St.
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Free.

Harlem Opera Theater: Salute to Black History Month
Harlem Opera Theater will salute Black History Month with songs of praise and protest in recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the March from Selma to Montgomery and the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March, Washington DC. The operatic voices of emerging and professional singers will bring the spirit of our history through music and verse.
Elisabeth Stephens, soprano
Steven Wallace, tenor
Quintin Calvin Lee, baritone
Dr. Gregory Hopkins on piano.
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard
6PM /$40 Reception and Concert, $25 Concert Only
212-491-2200

Dr. John
imgres“Dr. John had a lot to say (with a little help from the Black Keys’s Dan Auerbach and the Whitefield Brothers’ Max Weissenfeldt) on 2012’s masterful Locked Down. This time around, though, he’s let a late great get a few more words in. With last year’s Ske-Dat-De-Dat: The Spirit of Satch, the good Doctor and his co-producer/arranger extraordinaire Sarah Morrow bring some life back into Louis Armstrong’s works and reinvent what it means to make a tribute album.

And now, out of the studio and on the stage at Town Hall, five decades of Sasquatch’s work mixed with the characteristic boogie and funk of Dr. John guarantee the spirit lives on. Joining Dr. John is special guest Grammy Award-winning trumpeter Nicholas Payton.” (Ashley Steves, VillageVoice)
Town Hall, 123 W. 43rd St.
212-840-2824 /
8 p.m. / $50 – $65

Lincoln Center’s College Cabaret
Come out to Lincoln Center’s first-ever College Cabaret.

The polls have closed and the winners have been chosen. Six groups will take the stage.
Performers include:
Mark Oleszko and The Hashtag Band
Nina Grolman
Glass
Hallohallo Dance
Brandon Ilaw and Friends
Ashley Menestrina
Doors open at 7:00pm. There will be buy one get one 50% off drink specials all night plus a chance to win tickets to see Allison Williams from HBO’s Girls perform live at Lincoln Center! (and much more!)
David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, 61 W 62 St
7pm / FREE
212-875-5350

===================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
===================================================================================

A PremierPub + 3 Good Eating places

Jimmy’s Corner / 140 W 44th St (btw B’way & 7th ave)

IMG_2083Jimmy’s Corner is right in the heart of Times Square, but you won’t find it on the corner, it’s mid-block. Enter this long narrow bar and you are struck by the walls covered with mostly black-and-white boxing photographs, and memorabilia. Soon enough you learn that “Corner” refers to proprietor Jimmy Glenn’s long career as a corner man for some of boxing greats – Liston, Tyson, even “the greatest”, Ali.

Jimmy’s is a sort of time machine, taking you back to a time and place that no longer exists. All around you Times Square has cleaned up, grown up, assumed a new identity. Jimmy’s probably hasn’t changed a bit since it first opened in 1971. Certainly the bar itself looks original and the prices haven’t changed much either. When I brought a friend, who owns her own bar, she was surprised when she got the small tab for a round of drinks. Figured there must be a mistake, that maybe they forgot to charge for all the drinks.

Times Square today is filled with neon glitz and wandering tourists from Dubuque, but not Jimmy’s. You’ll likely find some old timer’s at the bar nursing their drinks, some younger locals at tables in the back, and maybe a few adventuresome tourists clutching their trusty guidebooks. There’s no food served here because this is just a bar, and sometimes that’s all you need.

On nights when no local team is playing, it’s a fine place to sip some drafts and listen to a great old time jukebox (40s, 50s, R&B, and soul). On sports nights this very narrow bar can get a bit claustrophobic, filled with excited fans watching their team on the TVs. Either way, Jimmy’s is the place to be if you are looking for an old time bar in the new Times Square.
————————————————————————————————————————
Website: are you kidding !
(although there is a facebook page with lots of photos –
facebook.com/jimmyscornernyc)
Phone #: 212-221-9510
Hours: 11am – 4 am, except Sunday they open 12 noon
Happy Hour: not necessary, low prices all day, every day
Subway: #1,2,3 to TimesSquare 42nd st
walk 2 blks N on 7th ave to 44th st; ½ blk E to Jimmy’s

===========================================================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
===========================================================================================

3 Good Eating places

It’s not difficult finding a place to eat in Manhattan.
Finding a good, inexpensive place to eat is a bit harder.
Here are a few of my faves in this neighborhood:

Patzeria Perfect Pizza – 231 W46 St. (Btw 7th/8th ave)
Perfect name for a pizza joint. On a street filled with Broadway theaters, this is a real hole in the wall, but don’t let the dive look scare you away. You can never go wrong with a slice of NYCity pizza, and this one is a classic thin crust. Only a few seats here, but pizza was made to eat standing up.

Shake Shack – 691 8th Ave. (Btw 43rd/44th st)
Danny Meyer has revolutionized the high quality burger in this town. Now he has a branch on the West Side that was desperately needed, with a bit less of the insane lines that you find at the Madison Sq. Park location. Worth the wait.

Xi’an Famous Foods - 24 W45th St. (Btw 5th/6th ave)
Try to avoid long lunch lines. Order lamb hand ripped noodles and warm your insides at one of the tables in the back. You’ll return, just remember that even mild is pretty spicy.
==============================================================

“3 Good Eating places” focuses on a quick bite, what I call “Fine Fast Food – NYCity Style”
This covers a wide range of food – the traditional pizza, burgers, & hot dogs; but also food trucks & carts, soup & sandwiches, picnic fixins’, raw bars & lobster rolls, bbq, vegetarian / falafel, ramen, chopped salad & salad bars. No reservations needed.
================================================================================

◊ For all my picks of 54 Good Eating places, with expanded descriptions, maps with contact info, and essays on my favorite 18 PremierPubs in 9 Neighborhoods on Manhattan’s WestSide order a copy of my e-book:
“Eating and Drinking on NYCity’s WestSide” ($3.99, available Spring 2015).
◊ Order before May 31, 2015 and receive a bonus – 27 of my favorite casual dining places with free Wi-Fi.
=========================================================

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (02/26) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s “Fab 5″+1 / Selected NYCity Events – THURSDAY, FEB. 26, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

In Conversation: Quentin Bajac and Shelley Rice   –  
SmartStuff/ Photography Talk    (7pm)   

The Shanghai Restoration Project  —  Music Mashup    (7:30pm)    

Edible Manhattan’s Good Spirits 2015  –  Food & Drink   (6pm)

John Berryman at 100: A Day-long Celebration   –  
SmartStuff/ Poetry Readings   (3pm)  [FREE]

The Skip James Project with 1032K Ensemble  —  Blues Music   (7pm)   [FREE]

City Bakery annual Hot Chocolate Festival  —  Food & Drink

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

In Conversation: Quentin Bajac and Shelley Rice
“Quentin Bajac, a noted author, is the chief curator of the Museum of Modern Art’s photography department. He talks with NYU professor Shelley Rice about the explosion of photography in the digital age, when images seem to come at us from everywhere.” (seniorplanet.org)
La Maison France, New York University, 16 Washington Mews
7pm / FREE
maisonfrancaise.as.nyu.edu

The Shanghai Restoration Project
“A performance by this group blends Chinese culture with hip-hop and electronic music to take listeners on a sonic journey through the city. The concert, inspired in part by 1930s Shanghai jazz bands, also involves projected visuals from contemporary Chinese artists. The singer Zhang Le and the animator and rapper Ray Lei will also take part.” (NYT)

“Liang . . . treats us to a delicious and lush blend of traditional Chinese instruments with hip-hop and electronica to make something truly unique and fun to listen to.” -PopMatters
Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th St.
At 7:30 p.m./ $25
212-864-5400, symphonyspace.org.

Edible Manhattan’s Good Spirits 2015
“The annual spirits bash comes to Manhattan for an evening of beverage pairings like Caleb’s Kola with Stolen Rum and Owl’s Brew with Sag Harbor Rum. Twenty restaurants including Burke & Wills, Luca & Bosco and Hecho en Dumbo provide the booze-sopping eats.” (TONY)
The Altman Building, 135 W 18th St. (btw Sixth and Seventh Aves)
6pm / $60-$70
212-741-3400

John Berryman at 100: A Day-long Celebration
Low Memorial Library, Columbia University
“More than a dozen poets, including Henri Cole, Cathy Park Hong, and Kevin Young, celebrate Berryman’s centennial, with panel discussions and a tribute reading.” (NewYorker)

An evening of poetry in honor of John Berryman, 1914–1972. A scholar and professor as well as a poet, John Berryman is best-known for The Dream Songs, an intensely personal sequence of 385 poems which brought him the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. In these he invented a style and form able to accommodate a vast range of material while expressing his turbulent emotions.
Barnard Hall, James Room, Columbia University, 3009 Broadway.
3 PM / FREE
For more information, visit poetrysociety.org.

The Skip James Project with 1032K Ensemble
SkipJames“The 1032K ensemble is named after an obscure property in physics in which time and space as we know them become almost chimerical. That might be a fitting metaphor for the career of Delta bluesman Nehemiah “Skip” James, who recorded some of the most haunting early blues recordings in one 1931 session and then all but disappeared until shortly before his death in the mid-’60s. Trombonist Ku-umba Frank Lacy, bassist Kevin Ray and drummer Andrew Drury revamp James’s songs.” (seniorplanet.org)
David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, 61 W 62 St.
(btw Columbus/Broadway Ave.)
at 7:30 / Target FREE Thursdays
get there early, no later than 7PM, if you want to get in what is a small performance space.
212-875-5350 / atrium.lincolncenter.org

City Bakery annual Hot Chocolate Festival
“Time is running out to sample the special brews featured at the City Bakery annual Hot Chocolate Festival, which wraps up on Saturday. While you sample Thursday’s “Happy” Hot Chocolate, put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) and enter the cafe’s Essay Contest. Answer the question they pose: “Should City Bakery hot chocolate be drunk with or without a homemade marshmallow?” There are three categories (written word, video and arts & crafts), with winning entries from each category receiving free hot chocolate for the remainder of 2015.” (dnainfo.com)
City Bakery, 3 W. 18th St., Flatiron.
7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

====================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Metropolitan Museum of Art:
‘Madame Cézanne’ (through March 15)
Cézanne’s paintings of his wife, Hortense Fiquet, have long stonewalled would-be psychologists, offering few indications of intimacy or interior life. (The poet Rainer Maria Rilke, enthusing over “Madame Cézanne in a Red Armchair,” focused on the work’s color scheme and called the chair “a personality in its own right.”) But assembled at the Met, and supported by more tender and informal graphite sketches, these portraits are more forthcoming. They suggest that numbing familiarity was actually, for Cézanne, a form of intimacy; that he could connect with portrait subjects only when they were as reliable a presence in his life as Mont Sainte-Victoire. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Rosenberg)

‘Thomas Hart Benton’s “America Today” Mural Rediscovered’ (through April 19)
The prickly American Regionalist Thomas Hart Benton had his share of detractors. But even they would probably acknowledge that his early mural “America Today” is the best of its kind, a raucous, cartwheeling, wide-angle look at 1920s America that set the standard for the Works Progress Administration’s mural program and has remained a New York City treasure. Now installed at the Met in a reconstruction of its original setting (a boardroom at the New School for Social Research), it captivates with period details (from the cut of a flapper gown to the mechanics of a blast furnace) and timely signs of socioeconomic and environmental distress (exhausted coal miners and hands reaching for coffee and bread). 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org. (Rosenberg)

Guggenheim Museum:
Guggenheim Museum: ‘On Kawara — Silence’ (through May 3)
The first retrospective of this Conceptual Art giant turns the museum’s spiral into a vortex suffused with the consciousness of time, life’s supreme ruler, in all its quotidian daily unfoldings, historical events and almost incomprehensible grandeur. The presentation of date paintings, “I Got Up” postcards and “I AM Still Alive” telegrams echoes Mr. Kawara’s exquisite sense of discipline and craft. This is an extraordinary tribute. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org. (Smith)

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901–1911 (through spring 2015)
ex_Kandinsky_Landscape-near-Murnau-with-Locomotive_490Early in his career Vasily Kandinsky experimented with printmaking, produced brightly-colored landscapes of the German countryside, and explored recognizable and recurrent motifs. This intimate exhibition drawn from the Guggenheim collection explores the artist’s representational origins.

Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum (continuing):
The stately doors of the 1902 Andrew Carnegie mansion, home to the Cooper Hewitt, are open again after an overhaul and expansion of the premises. Historic house and modern museum have always made an awkward fit, a standoff between preservation and innovation, and the problem remains, but the renovation has brought a wide-open new gallery space, a cafe and a raft of be-your-own-designer digital enhancements. Best of all, more of the museum’s vast permanent collection is now on view, including an Op Art weaving, miniature spiral staircases, ballistic face masks and a dainty enameled 18th-century version of a Swiss knife. Like design itself, this institution is built on tumult and friction, and you feel it. 2 East 91st Street, at Fifth Avenue, 212-849-8400, cooperhewitt.org. (Cotter)

==================================================

Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Ten museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:

• 110th Street – Museum for African Art

• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio

• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York

• 92nd Street – The Jewish Museum

• 91st Street – Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

• 89th Street – National Academy Museum

• 88th Street – Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

• 86th Street – Neue Galerie New York

• 83rd Street – Goethe-Institut

Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
• 82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Additionally, though technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th St. and the The Morgan Library & Museum on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave. Now plan your own museum crawl. ========================================================

For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 02/24 and 02/22.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (02/25) + Ice Skating in NYCity

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

Steps Ahead 35th Anniversary Celebration   –  Jazz    (8:30pm)   (11pm)

Selected Shorts: Martin Amis and Jeffrey Eugenides   —  
SmartStuff/ Readings    (7:30pm)    

Robert Christgau in Conversation With Rob Sheffield   –  
SmartStuff/ Book Talk    (7pm)

Kate Pierson   –  Rock /Pop   (8pm) 

Julia Holter  —  Experimental Music   (7:30pm)   

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Steps Ahead 35th Anniversary Celebration (through Feb. 28)
images-1“Steps Ahead, a leading fusion outfit of the 1980s, has always stood for advanced interplay, following the lead of its members. This anniversary run features the vibraphonist Mike Mainieri, the pianist Eliane Elias and the drummer Peter Erskine — all heard on the album “Steps Ahead,” from 1983 — as well as Marc Johnson on bass and George Garzone on saxophones.” (Chinen-NYT)
Birdland, 315 West 44th St. (btw 8/9 Ave.)
At 8:30 and 11 p.m. /
212-581-3080, birdlandjazz.com.

Selected Shorts: Martin Amis and Jeffrey Eugenides
“Symphony Space’s flagship reading series, Selected Shorts, continues its 30th-anniversary season with Martin Amis, author of Money and London Fields, and Jeffrey Eugenides, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Middlesex and The Marriage Plot, who present readings of their short fiction and talk about their work.” (TONY)
Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway at 95th St
7:30pm / $29, 30 and under $15

Robert Christgau in Conversation With Rob Sheffield 
0062238795.zoom.1.thumbnail“Mr. Christgau, the self-proclaimed “Dean of American Rock Critics,” discusses his memoir, “Going Into the City: Portrait of a Critic as a Young Man.” The book recounts his adventures in music criticism over the past 50 years, like his time at Woodstock. He will be joined by Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone.” (NYT)

Rob Sheffield has become a cultural sensation of his own—with books like Turn Around Bright Eyes and Love Is a Mixtape, Rob has carved out his place in the world of music criticism. Don’t miss this exclusive evening with the scribe to some of twentieth century music and culture’s most legendary moments!
Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway, at 12th Street,
7pm / The event will be located in the Strand’s 3rd floor Rare Book Room
Buy a copy of Going into the City or a $15 Strand gift card in order to attend this event.
212-473-1452, strandbooks.com.

Kate Pierson
“After more than 35 years as a B-52, postpunk belter Kate Pierson has finally recorded a solo album, Guitars and Microphones, featuring collaborations with the Strokes’ Nick Valensi and pop genius Sia Furler. Her still-golden pipes should fill City Winery quite nicely.” (TONY)
City Winery, 155 Varick St.,at Vandam St.
8pm / $20-$25
212-608-0555, citywinery.com

Julia Holter
Julia-holter“In keeping with its vision to make unlikely bedfellows out of sonically disparate musicians, Ecstatic Music Festival pairs Julia Holter with Spektral Quartet to flesh out experimental Brooklyn composer Alex Temple’s newly expanded “Behind the Wallpaper.” Over several movements, the piece explores loneliness, a sense of displacement, and altered perception, much like Holter’s 2013 LP, Loud City Song.

Holter will also be performing orchestral versions of her own material with the quartet, which promise to be nothing short of hypnotic. You can snag advance tickets to the show for $25, but for two or more Ecstatic shows the price drops to $20, with the additional option of a $150 Festival Pass. All ages are welcome to attend.” (Lindsey Rhoades, VillageVoice)
Merkin Concert Hall,129 West 67th St.
7:30 p.m./ $20–$25

======================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
======================================================================

Ice Skating in NYCity (nycgo.com)
“Winter just isn’t winter without ice-skating in New York City. And though most of us can probably name two or three rinks off the top of our heads, we might be more than mildly surprised to find there are 15 venues open for public ice-skating this holiday season. The best known of the City’s rinks is without a doubt the Rink at Rockefeller Center—tracing figure eights while surrounded by the shops, restaurants and buildings of a NYC landmark provides the quintessential NYC skating experience—but plenty of other (frequently less crowded) options exist.” Here are the ice rinks you want to head to in Manhattan:

Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park
imgresWhere: Sixth Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets
When: Late October to early March
Price: Free; skate rental $15–$19
If you already own skates, this is the most affordable spot in the City—it’s the only rink that offers free admission. Bryant Park also hosts annual holiday shops, a good destination if you want to cross some gifts off your list after your turn on the ice.

Trump Rink in Central Park
Where: Central Park, mid-park between 62nd and 63rd Streets
When: Late October to first week of April
Price: Adults $11.25 (Mon.–Thurs.), $18 (Fri.–Sun.); kids 11 and under $6; seniors $5 (Mon.–Thurs.), $9 (Fri.–Sun.); skate rental $8
Few rinks can match the ambience of Central Park’s Trump Rink, especially after a fresh snowfall. If you’re there at night, be sure to look up for some prime NYC stargazing.

Rink at Rockefeller Center
Where: Fifth Avenue between 49th and 50th Streets
When: Mid-October through April
Price: Adults $27–$30, kids 10 and under $15; skate rental $12
Millions of visitors plan trips to the City every year just to catch a glimpse of skaters taking a spin on the ice below the famous Christmas tree and gilded statue of Prometheus; others will wait in long lines to experience it for themselves.
——————————————————————————————————-
Ice Rink at Riverbank State Park
Where: Henry Hudson Parkway between West 138th and West 145th Streets
When: November through March
Price: Adults $5, kids 11 and under $3; skate rental $6
Riverbank, in Hamilton Heights, is the only state park in Manhattan; it offers incredible river views across to New Jersey and gorgeous vistas of the George Washington Bridge.

Lasker Rink
Where: Central Park, northeast corner between 106th and 108th Streets
When: Late October to late March
Price: Adults $7.50, kids 12 and under $4; skate rental $6.50
Up in the northern reaches of the park, Lasker Rink is a bit less discovered than its sister skate center in the park (see “Trump Rink in Central Park” below)—and a much better deal.

See/Change Ice Rink
Where: Fulton and Front Streets, South Street Seaport
When: Late November to early March
Price: Adults $10, kids 5 and under free; skate rental $6
The seaport relaunched itself in 2013 after Superstorm Sandy with the opening of an outdoor ice rink. Bonus: November 28, opening night, coincides with a tree-lighting ceremony.

Sky Rink at Chelsea Piers
Where: Pier 61, West 23rd Street and Hudson River Park
When: Year-round
Price: $10; skate rental $5
Want to skate downtown…in mid-July? The enormous rink at Chelsea Piers is the place to head, though it’s a reliable stop-off any time of year.

Standard Hotel
Where: 848 Washington St., between West 12th and West 13th Streets
When: Late November until early spring (weather dependent)
Price: Adults $12, kids $6; skate rental $3
One of the hipper—and more exclusive—hotels in the City has a ground-level rink available to the public. If you can’t find the info on the main website, check standardculture.com for the latest prices and times.

nycgo.com, the website of New York City’s official marketing and tourism organization, has lots of useful NYCity info. This fine site is worth checking out when you are planning your NYCity visit, anytime of the year.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (02/24) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – TUESDAY, FEB. 24, 2015
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”  

Ronald K. Brown/Evidence   –  Dance    (7:30pm)   

Buckwheat Zydeco   —  Cajun Music    (8pm)     (10pm)

Robert Glasper  –  Jazz    (8:30pm)     (10:30pm)

NASA Missions   –  SmartStuff/ Lecture   (6:30pm) 

Black Entertainers and New York City History  —  
SmartStuff/ Seminars and Discussion   (6:30pm)   [FREE]

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Feb.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
======================================================

Ronald K. Brown/Evidence (through March 1)
RonBrown“This is dancing that consecrates,” said The New York Times about Ronald K. Brown’s choreography, and it probably can’t be said any better. Experiencing this company’s special combination of Cuban, Caribbean, West African, and modern American dance movement is thrilling.

For its 30th anniversary season, the company takes the Joyce stage with two programs and many of Brown’s signature pieces: Grace (1999), Gatekeepers, and The Subtle One (2014), performed to live accompaniment by composer Jason Moran and the Bandwagon. Also featured: Through Time and Culture (2014), which offers audiences the now somewhat rare and always wonderful opportunity to see Brown perform a solo work.
Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue, at 19th St., Chelsea,
Tonight: at 7.30pm, – The Subtle One; Lessons (excerpts); Grace
212-242-0800 / joyce.org.

Buckwheat Zydeco (also Wednesday)
images-1“This singer and accordionist from Louisiana (whose real name is Stanley Dural Jr.) is a master craftsman of zydeco, an ebullient strain of Cajun folk, and an unpretentious showman with musical flair for miles. He held court last year on the final episode of “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon,” performing a gleeful rendition of “On a Night Like This.” (Anderson-NYT)
Iridium Jazz Club, 1650 Broadway, at 51st St.
At 8 and 10 p.m. / $35
212-582-2121 / theiridium.com.

Robert Glasper (through March 1)
imgres“The pianist’s last two albums, “Black Radio,” from 2012, and “Black Radio 2,” from 2013, hit a nerve with the public (the first won a Grammy for Best R. & B. album). These best-selling (for jazz, that is) recordings blended post-bop jazz, hip-hop, rock, and R. & B. and spoke to the postmodern leanings of contemporary listeners. Guest vocalists assisted in that effort on the albums, but at the Village Vanguard, Glasper is scaling back with his restlessly interactive trio, an instrumental setting that will also allow the leader’s rousing playing to take the spotlight.” (NewYorker)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St.
8:30pm + 10:30 pm / $30
212-255-4037 / villagevanguard.com
Remember, the Vanguard will celebrate it’s 80th Anniversary the week of March 10.

NASA Missions / Astro Live Feb 2015
After a nine-year journey, NASA’s New Horizons mission will soon be arriving at Pluto. But this is not the only spacecraft NASA has launched—so many robotic craft have traveled around Earth, to Mars, even to Jupiter. Join Brian Levine and Carter Emmart for a ride around the solar system and beyond to visit these missions.
Hayden Planetarium Space Theater
6:30 pm / $15

Black Entertainers and New York City History
The Gotham Center welcomes four authors —whose subjects range from Harry Belafonte, to the PBS show Soul!, to women artists from the ’40s through the Civil Rights Movement—for a unique discussion on black entertainment in New York. Participants: Judy Smith (UMass Boston), author of Becoming Belafonte: Black Artist, Public Radical; Gayle Wald(George Washington University), author of It’s Been Beautiful: Soul! and Black Power Television; Farah Jasmine Griffin(Columbia University), author of Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II; and Ruth Feldstein (Rutgers-Newark), author of How It Feels to Be Free: Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights Movement.

Co-sponsored by the Gotham Center for NYC History.
The Graduate Center CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave.
6:30pm-8:00pm / FREE
212-817-7000

==============================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had a record 56 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
===============================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
107508‘The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’ (through March 22) In his printed works, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec chronicled and publicized the music halls, theaters, circuses, operas and cafes of Paris with terrific verve, sly wit and surprising subtlety. This enthralling show presents approximately 100 examples drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Johnson)

‘The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World’(through April 5) Despite being predictable and market-oriented in its choice of 17 artists, this museum’s first painting survey in decades is well worth seeing. About half the artists are exceptional and the rest are represented by their best work. Based on the premise that all historical painting styles are equally available today, the exhibition has been smartly installed to juxtapose different approaches: figurative and abstract, digital and handmade, spare and opulent. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

New-York Historical Society:
‘Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein’ (through April 19) Almost 50 years ago, the picture editor of a campus newspaper at City College of New York assigned himself a breaking story: coverage of what promised to be a massive march in Alabama, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to demand free-and-clear voting rights for African-Americans. On short notice the editor, Stephen Somerstein, grabbed his cameras, climbed on a bus, and headed south. The 55 pictures of black leaders and everyday people in this show, installed in a hallway and small gallery, are some that he shot that day. The image of Dr. King’s head seen in monumental silhouette that has become a virtual logo of the film “Selma” is based on a Somerstein original. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Cotter)

Rubin Museum of Art:
‘The All-Knowing Buddha: A Secret Guide’ (through April 13) This show presents 54 paintings that illustrate step-by-step instructions for followers of Tibetan Buddhism. Delicately painted on 10-by-10-inch paper sheets, most of the pages depict a monk having fabulous visions in a verdant landscape. Thought to have been commissioned by a Mongolian patron and executed by unidentified artists in a Chinese workshop sometime in the 18th century, it is a fascinating and remarkably thorough manual for seekers of higher consciousness. 150 West 17th Street, Chelsea, 212-620-5000,rubinmuseum.org. (Johnson)

=======================================================
For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 02/22 and 02/20.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment