Selected Events (01/25) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – SUNDAY, JAN. 25, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

New York Boat Show – Special Event   (10am-5pm)    

The New York Times Travel Show  – Special Event   (11am-5pm) 

Honeymoon in Vegas – Broadway Show   (3pm)

How the Right Is Wrong About Science  –  SmartStuff/ Lecture   (11am)

“The Girl From Ipanema” – Brazilian Music  (12:30pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
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Today is the last day to catch two fine expos at the Javits Center:
(Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 655 West 34th St.)

New York Boat Show
This annual event is celebrating its 110th anniversary this year. There will be kayaks, sailboats and yachts, as well as an array of marine technologies and accessories on display,

Tens of thousands of boating and fishing enthusiasts start their season at the Progressive® Insurance New York Boat Show. With its 110-year history the show is recognized as THE place to see the latest and greatest in boating.

You name it you’ll see it here first—everything from yachts and cruisers to bass and pontoon boats, from canoes and kayaks to fishing boats and personal watercraft, from marine electronics and engines to fishing gear, and more. Book trip with resorts and travel destinations, too.

There’s no better place to buy! The 5-day event is a once-a-year opportunity to compare makes and models, secure insurance and financing and gear up with the latest accessories all at one time!
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
212-216-2000 / nyboatshow.com.
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The New York Times Travel Show
One of the biggest travel shows in the world. Over the course of three days, more than 20,000 travelers and industry professionals will attend the travel show for unparalleled insight into the industry and a little mingling with fellow travel enthusiasts.

More than 500 exhibitor booths will be on display throughout the show for visitors to stop in and explore. Learn from travel industry experts as they lead out seminars and book signings. Enjoy over 100 cultural presentations from across the world, and let your tastebuds in on a little action when attending Taste of the World, the culinary travel showcase during The New York Times Travel Show. Fun for the entire family, explore the world at The New York Times Travel Show without ever leaving New York City.
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(212) 216-2000 / nyttravelshow.com

Honeymoon in Vegas opens on Broadway
image“Honeymoon in Vegas brings a whole bunch of singing Elvis impersonators to the Great White Way. Tony Danza also gets to show off his song-and-dance chops (give a whole new meaning to “Hold me closer Tony Danza.”
———————
“But it’s very funny, with a detour to Hawaii and those iconic skydiving Elvis impersonators. The cast is superb, and what Danza lacks in strong vocal chops he makes up for in charm and characterful crooning. Gary Griffin’s frisky staging abounds in sight gags and gorgeous chorus girls. In terms of sheer bubbly fun, Honeymoon ranks up there with some of my favorite new musical comedies on the job—The Full Monty, Hairspray or In the Heights—and recent ones—The Book of Mormon and A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Broadway may be a crapshoot, but Honeymoon hits the jackpot.” (TONY, David Cote)
Nederlander Theatre, 208 W 41st St. (btw Broadway and Eighth Ave)
3pm / $75-$165
Venue phone: 212-921-8000 / nederlandertheatre.com
Event phone: 800-745-3000 / honeymoonbroadway.com

How the Right Is Wrong About Science
With the rise of conservatism in America we have been witnessing an increasing anti-science bias. The new Republican majority in the House and Senate will result in vehemently anti-science representatives being appointed to key positions, roles that will shape the future of America for years to come. How bad is it going to get and what can we do to stop them? (thoughtgallery.org)
New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 W. 64th St.
at 11:00 am – 12:30 pm / FREE
212-874-5210

“The Girl From Ipanema”
jobim-652x367A Special JOBIM Birthday Celebration Brunch and 50 year anniversary of “The Girl from Ipanema.” Vocalist Julie Eigenberg – known to her fans as Julie E. – & Manhattan Transfer’s pianist Yaron Gershovsky with World Guitar Master Andres Laprida team up to pay tribute to Brazilian jazz legend Tom Jobim, king of the bossa nova and Grammy-winning composer of favorites like “The Girl From Ipanema.”
Highline Ballroom, 431 West 16th St. (btw 9th Avenue and 10th Avenue)
12:30pm / $25
highlineballroom.com

==============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
107508‘The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’ (through March 22) In his printed works, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec chronicled and publicized the music halls, theaters, circuses, operas and cafes of Paris with terrific verve, sly wit and surprising subtlety. This enthralling show presents approximately 100 examples drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Johnson)

‘Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs’ (through Feb. 10) A popular image of the elderly Matisse is of a serene, bespectacled pasha propped up in bed and surrounded by doves and flowers. But in the years around 1940, he must have felt he was living a nightmare. He and his wife of more than four decades separated. He underwent debilitating surgery for cancer. During World War II, he fled south to Nice, only to have that city threatened with bombardment. Through everything, he worked on. It is this Matisse — the invalid, insomniac, night-worker and waking dreamer — we meet in the marvelous, victory-lap show that has arrived in New York from London, trailing light, praise and lines around the block. 212-708-9400, moma.org; admission is by timed tickets. (Cotter)

‘Sturtevant: Double Trouble’ (through Feb. 22) Among the first things you see in MoMA’s taut, feisty retrospective of the American artist Elaine Sturtevant is work by far better known figures: Joseph Beuys, Jasper Johns, Marcel Duchamp. In each case, however, the pieces are by Ms. Sturtevant herself, who spent much of a long career adopting and adapting the art and styles of others to create a body of work entirely her own, one which raises questions about the value of art, about the hows and whys of producing it, and about the degrees to which quasi-replication can be an exercise in flattery, parody, objectivity, originality and love. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Cotter)

‘The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World’(through April 5) Despite being predictable and market-oriented in its choice of 17 artists, this museum’s first painting survey in decades is well worth seeing. About half the artists are exceptional and the rest are represented by their best work. Based on the premise that all historical painting styles are equally available today, the exhibition has been smartly installed to juxtapose different approaches: figurative and abstract, digital and handmade, spare and opulent. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

New-York Historical Society:
‘Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein’ (through April 19) Almost 50 years ago, the picture editor of a campus newspaper at City College of New York assigned himself a breaking story: coverage of what promised to be a massive march in Alabama, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to demand free-and-clear voting rights for African-Americans. On short notice the editor, Stephen Somerstein, grabbed his cameras, climbed on a bus, and headed south. The 55 pictures of black leaders and everyday people in this show, installed in a hallway and small gallery, are some that he shot that day. The image of Dr. King’s head seen in monumental silhouette that has become a virtual logo of the film “Selma” is based on a Somerstein original. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Cotter)

Annie Leibovitz: ‘Pilgrimage’ (through Feb. 22) No living celebrities are portrayed in “Pilgrimage,” but lots of celebrated figures from the past are indirectly represented, from Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson to Eleanor Roosevelt and Robert Smithson. In the spring of 2009, Ms. Leibovitz set out on a two-year journey that took her to about two dozen historic sites in the United States and Britain. Most of these were house museums dedicated to famous individuals, where she photographed the rooms they inhabited and objects they owned and used. Though often poetically atmospheric, these pictures are disappointingly less lively than her portraits of famous entertainers. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Johnson)

Rubin Museum of Art:
‘The All-Knowing Buddha: A Secret Guide’ (through April 13) This show presents 54 paintings that illustrate step-by-step instructions for followers of Tibetan Buddhism. Delicately painted on 10-by-10-inch paper sheets, most of the pages depict a monk having fabulous visions in a verdant landscape. Thought to have been commissioned by a Mongolian patron and executed by unidentified artists in a Chinese workshop sometime in the 18th century, it is a fascinating and remarkably thorough manual for seekers of higher consciousness. 150 West 17th Street, Chelsea, 212-620-5000,rubinmuseum.org. (Johnson)

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Selected Events (01/24) + Today’s Featured Neighborhood: Tribeca

Today’s “Fab 5″+1 / Selected NYCity Events – SATURDAY, JAN. 24, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

Christine Ebersole – Big Noise From Winnetka Cabaret  (7pm)    

Winter Jam – NYC’s Ultimate Snow Day  Sporting Life   (11am)   [FREE]

The Big Cheesy Food & Drink   (11am)

Robert Herridge: TV’s Forgotten Auteur  –  Music on TV   (2pm)

Prohibition Saturdays Jazz   (5pm)  [FREE]

The Mariinsky BalletBallet   (7:30pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:

♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
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Christine Ebersole – Big Noise From Winnetka (also Jan. 28-31)
artistpage_christineThe return engagement of two-time Tony Award winner Christine Ebersole following a sold out 2 week run of her new show “Big Noise From Winnetka.”

Christine’s ”stirring new show” as described by the New York Times’ Stephen Holden, returns for 8 performances, with Musical Director Bette Sussman (Whitney Houston, Cyndi Lauper, Bette Midler) leading Christine’s 4 piece band and vocalist Tabitha Fair. The concert features both classic and re-imagined Broadway hits, pop and jazz classics and anecdotes about growing up.

Winner of two Tony Awards for Best Actress in a Musical (42nd Street and Grey Gardens), Christine co-stars on the hit TBS series “Sullivan & Son (now in its 3rd season). Christine has starred in film (Wolf of Wall Street), television (Royal Pains) and has performed concerts in theaters and concert halls across the country, from The Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall to The Pasadena and Boston Pops.
54 Below, 254 West 54th St.
7PM / $60-$90
646-476-3551, 54below.com.

Winter Jam – NYC’s Ultimate Snow Day
searchPresented by NYC Parks, Lake Placid, I Love NY, and I Ski NY, Winter Jam NYC is the ultimate snow day: a free winter sports festival for New Yorkers of all ages! Our partners at Gore Mountain will blow lots of fresh snow in the heart of Manhattan, so there will be plenty for all to enjoy! (looks like this event has perfect snow timing this year).

Featured Venues
Lake Placid Snow Field
Snowshoeing
Learn to Ride: Skiing and Snowboarding
Sledding and Kicksledding
Snow Man Building
Taste NY Winter Market
Equipment provided at no cost, or bring your own snow sports gear and enjoy the terrain! Please note: lines for activities may close early.
Central Park, Manhattan, Bandshell Area, Enter at 72nd Street
11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. / FREE

The Big Cheesy (also Jan. 25)
imageThe only thing better than a good grilled cheese sandwich is six artisan grilled cheese sandwiches paired with a local NYC brew, which is precisely what you’ll get at Openhouse Gallery’s The Big Cheesy.

  • The Big Cheesy: Winter Edition takes place in one-hour time slots over the course of two extraordinarily delicious days, January 24 and 25, from noon to 7pm. Enjoy a mouthwatering lineup of grilled-cheese contenders including Sons of Essex, Hudson Common, Eggs Travaganza, Twist and Smash’d, Mrs. Dorsey’s Kitchen and Fame by Alex Mitow.
  • Tickets are $30 and provide exclusive access to taste sandwiches from the six featured contenders, enjoy two beers courtesy of Goose Island and vote for your favorite in the Big Cheesy People’s Choice Award.

*A portion of the proceeds will benefit Food Bank For NYC.
Openhouse Gallery, 201 Mulberry St. (btw Kenmare and Spring Sts)
11am / $30
212-334-0288 / openhousegallery.org

Robert Herridge: TV’s Forgotten Auteur (also Sun. Jan.25)
Robert Herridge was one of television’s visionaries, creating programs in many genres, always with a signature style. The Paley Center spotlights Herridge’s musical achievements in jazz, folk, and blues. Highlights include: 1957’s The Sound of Jazz featuring Thelonious Monk, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Coleman Hawkins, Jimmy Rushing, and more; The Sound of Miles Davis (1959) featuring Miles Davis with John Coltrane and the Gil Evans Orchestra performing “So What,” “The Duke,” “Blues for Pablo,” and “New Rhumba”; 1960’s Folk Sound, U.S.A., a program that had a major impact on the teenaged Bob Dylan. Performers include Joan Baez, Cisco Houston, Peter Yarrow, John Jacob Niles, John Lee Hooker, and Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys.
The Paley Center for Media, 25 W 52nd St.
2pm / $10
212-621-6600 / paleycenter.org

Prohibition Saturdays (monthly, formerly the Empire Salon)
SALON-postcard-HalloweenStomp14-FRONT-250px”The prohibition saturdays vintage jazz party at the gansevoort park rooftop features an evening of live music by professor cunningham and his old school, burlesque by calamity chang and minx arcana, and sexy trivia. free swing dance lesson at 6:45pm.” (the skint)
Gansevoort Park Hotel, 420 Park Ave South (btw 28/29 St.)
5-10pm / no minimum, free admission.

Elsewhere, but not too far for fans of classical ballet:
The Mariinsky Ballet (last 2 days!)
Chopin: Dances for Piano
Choreography by Michel Fokine, Benjamin Millepied, and Jerome Robbins
Musical direction by Valery Gergiev

2015_WinterSpring_Mariinsky_ChopinEvening_613x463Frédéric Chopin (1810—49) composed some of Western history’s most intimately romantic music, exquisite works that have served as the inspiration for countless choreographers. In this mixed program, the Mariinsky Ballet convenes three dances from distinct eras set to his piano music, performed live.

Michel Fokine’s ethereal Chopiniana (1908), one of the oldest works in the Mariinsky repertory, embodies the soul of classical ballet. Jerome Robbins’ ballet In the Night (1970), set to a slate of nocturnes, captures three couples in varying emotional states. And Benjamin Millepied (L.A. Dance Project, 2014 Next Wave)—inspired by his early exposure to Chopin’s preludes and études as a young dancer—expresses the music’s timelessness and passion in Without (2011), performed by 10 dancers.

It is the beating heart of Russian culture: St. Petersburg’s Mariinsky Theatre, a bastion of arts excellence that has endured regime changes and revolutions for over two centuries. As a cultivator of innovation and talent, it is unparalleled. Balanchine studied there, as did Baryshnikov, Nijinsky, and Nureyev. Tchaikovsky and Rimsky-Korsakov premiered operas there. And Mahler, Berlioz and Rachmaninoff all conducted on its stages.
Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Ave. (btw St. Felix St. and Ashland Place)
(718) 636-4100
subway: #2, 3, to Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center (about 30 min from TimesSquare)

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================

A PremierPub / Tribeca

B-Flat / 277 Church St. (btw Franklin/White St))

b_flat4There are some places that are tough to find, then add a layer of mystery when you do find them. B-Flat has a nondescript, almost unmarked door at street level – today’s speakeasy vibe. Open this door and you face a dimly lit stairway down to their basement location. It almost takes a leap of faith to follow the stairs down to their interior door.

But open that door and a pleasant surprise awaits you.

It’s a basement jazz spot all right, but not like any traditional jazz joint you may have been to before. This place looks as fresh as today, probably because it’s only been open for 6 years. Even though it hasn’t had a chance to age gracefully, the cherry wood accents and low lighting make this small space very inviting.

There is always jazz, often progressive jazz, playing over their very discrete, stylish bose speakers, setting just the right tone as you find a seat at the bar, or one of the small tables. There is wine and beer available, but this place has some expert mixologists making some very creative cocktails, which I’m told change seasonally, a nice touch.

Come at happy hour and tasty cocktails like the el Diablo or the lychee martini are $8 – not bad. I am a sucker for any drink made with lychee and how can you not try a tequila drink named el Diablo. There is also nice selection of small bites available at happy hour and a food menu that is as innovative as the cocktail menu, so this does not have to be a happy hour only stop.

It wasn’t surprising to find a tasty prosciutto and arugula salad with yuzu dressing, but I did not expect to find such a good version of fried chicken breast on the apps menu. Here it’s called “Tatsuta.” Best bet is to sample happy hour, then dinner on a Monday or Wednesday night, when you can finish with no cover live jazz that starts around 8.

This place is tough to find (look for a small slate sandwich board on the sidewalk out front advertising happy hour) and on some nights when there is no live music it may be a little too quiet for some. But I think it’s worth searching out if you want a place with good music, food, and especially drinks, away from the maddening crowd.

Website: http://http://www.bflat.info/index.html
Phone #: 212-219-2970
Hours: Mo-Wed 5pm-2am; Th-Sat 5pm-3am; no Sun
Happy Hour: 5-7pm every day; $8 cocktails + special prices on apps
Music: Mon/Wed 8pm
Subway: #1 to Franklin; walk E 1 blk to Church; N 1 blk to bFlat

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“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
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Selected Events (01/23) + GallerySpecialExhibits: Chelsea

Today’s “Fab 5″ / Selected NYCity Events – FRIDAY, JAN. 23, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

J.P. Morgan Tournament of Champions – Sporting Event  (6pm)    

Jimmy Cobb – Jazz   (7pm)  (9pm)  (10:30pm)

“Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation,” 
SmartStuff/ Museum Exhibit   (7pm)

The Birdland Big Band  –  Jazz    (5:15pm)

Parisian Percussion: Xenakis, Grisey, Hurel – Music   (8pm)  [FREE]

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
=========================================================

J.P. Morgan Tournament of Champions
“This annual contest at Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall, where the world’s top-ranked professional squash players have been competing for the past week, will conclude on Friday with the men’s and women’s finals. Ticket information and a schedule are at tocsquash.com.” (NYT)

Jimmy Cobb (through Jan.25)
“The shrewd and subtle drummer who is the last surviving band member to have played on the world’s most famous jazz album, “Kind of Blue,” is a conjurer who implies intensity, rather than stating it outright. In celebration of his eighty-fifth birthday, Cobb brings together a quartet featuring the guitarist Peter Bernstein and the pianist Richard Wyands which will spotlight the leader’s undiminished skills.” (NewYorker)
Smoke Jazz Club, 2751 Broadway, between 105th and 106th Sts.
212-864-6662.

“Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation”
“Opening Friday at the Morgan Library & Museum is “Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation,” a thematically and chronologically-arranged exhibition featuring the Gilder Lehrman Institute’s renowned collection of American historical documents. Focusing on Abraham Lincoln’s mastery of language and how his words changed the course of history, the exhibition includes photographic portraits and books owned and used by Lincoln.” (dnainfo.com)
Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Ave. at 36th St.,
10:30 am. to 9 pm. / normally $18, but here’s the trick, try FREE Friday Evenings
Relax and enjoy free Friday evenings at the Morgan from 7 to 9 p.m.
Live classical music in the Gilbert Court is provided by performers from Mannes College The New School For Music. 6:30–8:30 p.m.
Dining is available at the Morgan Café.

The Birdland Big Band, Music Director: Tommy Igoe
(Guest Conductor, Rob Middleton)
Founded by drummer and musical director Tommy Igoe, the Birdland Big Band features the finest musicians in New York! The BBB roars into action every Friday, playing the finest Jazz, Latin and Brazilian music from the world’s best arrangers. After work or before a show, come hear one of the world’s best drummers driving the hardest swinging band in New York. Experience why the BBB is fast becoming the must-see weekly jazz event in New York and kick off your weekend with what critics are calling “the best live music bargain in all of NYC!”
Birdland, 315 West 44th St. (btw 8/9 ave)
At 5:15 pm./ $30 (sit at the bar and this cover includes a drink)
212-581-3080 / birdlandjazz.com.

Parisian Percussion: Xenakis, Grisey, Hurel
PROGRAM:
Gérard Grisey Stèle (1995) duo for bass drums (with Matt Ward)
François-Bernard Mâche Phènix (1982) vibraphone/9 boobams
Philippe Hurel Loops IV (2005) marimba
Martin Matalon Short Stories (2005) vibraphone
Iannis Xenakis Rebonds (1987-89) drums/woods

Talujon once again presents member Tom Kolor in a solo recital. “Parisian Percussion” highlights works composed in Paris in the extraordinarily fertile period of 1982 to 2005.
Tenri Cultural Institute, 43 West 13th St.
8pm / FREE
(212) 645-2800

==============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================

Chelsea is the heart of the NYCity contemporary art scene. Home to more than 300 art galleries, the Rubin Museum, the Joyce Theater and The Kitchen performance spaces, there is no place like it anywhere in the world. Come here to browse free exhibitions by world-renowned artists and those unknowns waiting to be discovered in an art district that is concentrated between West 18th and West 27th Streets, and 10th and 11th Avenues. Afterwards stop in the Chelsea Market, stroll on the High Line, or rest up at one of the many cafes and bars and discuss the fine art – my fave is Ovest on W 27th St., where the aperitivo is like Happy Hour on steroids.

Here are couple of current exhibitions that the NYT recommends:

‘The Thing and the Thing-in-Itself’ (through Jan. 24)
This spare, thought-provoking exhibition’s title derives from a distinction posited by Immanuel Kant. That is, a thing can be known by a human being only from his or her unique perspective. What the thing is in and of itself, independent of any perceiver’s view of it, isn’t fully knowable. Demonstrating this idea are things by Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte, Ad Reinhardt, Piero Manzoni, Joseph Kosuth and Yoko Ono. Andrea Rosen, 525 West 24th Street, 212-627-6000, andrearosengallery.com. (Johnson)

‘Disturbing Innocence’ (through Jan. 31)
At the start of this entertaining and provocative exhibition organized by the painter Eric Fischl, you encounter ominous images of suburban homes in photographs by James Casebere and Gregory Crewdson, paintings by Peter Drake and a sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein. Moving into the main part of the exhibition you discover what goes on behind closed doors: a riot of polymorphous perversity in the form of paintings, photographs and sculptures, by more than 50 artists, representing children, dolls, mannequins, robots and toys. Flag Art Foundation, 545 West 25th Street, 212-206-0220, flagartfoundation.org. (Johnson)

For a listing of 25 essential galleries in the Chelsea Art Gallery District, organized by street, which enables you to create your own Chelsea Art Gallery crawl, see the Chelsea Gallery Guide (nycgo.com) Or check out TONY magazine’s list of the “Best Chelsea Galleries” and click through to see what’s on view. Now plan your own gallery crawl.
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 01/21 and 01/19.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (01/22) + Today’sFeaturedNeighborhood: Upper WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″ / Selected NYCity Events – THURSDAY, JAN. 22, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

Open Rehearsal – Vengerov Performs Tchaikovsky – Classical Music  (9:45am)    

Drawing Workshop and Portfolio Review – Special Event   (6:30pm)

Alejandro Escovedo – Pop/Rock   (8pm)

Calidore String Quartet  –  Classical Music    (7:30pm)   [FREE]

“ROUND-UP” – Music and Film   (7:30pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
=========================================================

Open Rehearsal – Vengerov Performs Tchaikovsky
1415-0122aNew York Philharmonic’s Open Rehearsal is a fascinating opportunity to watch the New York Philharmonic at work, and see how a piece of music is shaped and polished by the conductor and the musicians.

Today, conductor Long Yu leads the Philharmonic with violinist Maxim Vengerov performing Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich.

Tickets are $20 each and can be ordered online, by phone, by mail, by fax, or in person at the Avery Fisher Hall Box Office. Open Rehearsals begin at 9:45 AM (except where noted) in Avery Fisher Hall, and end at approximately 12:30 PM (sometimes extending to 1 PM, at the discretion of the conductor). 
Lincoln Center, Avery Fisher Hall

DISEÑO | Drawing Workshop and Portfolio Review
Join Marvel Comics artist Phil Jimenez for a drawing tutorial and, for the budding illustrators amongst you, a portfolio review. A graduate of New York City’s School of Visual Arts, Jimenez is famous for his work on “Wonder Woman” and the miniseries “Infinite Crisis.” Participants should bring recent work for review, and any special materials they may wish to use. Paper, pencils, pens and charcoal will all be provided.
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, 2 E. 91st St.,
6;30PM / FREE, but pre-registration is required.

Alejandro Escovedo (through Jan.24)
imgres“In 2003, this Texas-born and Austin-based rocker collapsed onstage and then faced a long, arduous recovery from hepatitis C. To help defray the costs, some of his many friends and admirers—including Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, John Cale, and Jennifer Warnes—started putting on benefit shows, and then recorded a tribute album of his songs, entitled “Por Vida.” By 2011, he was back in fighting form, and that year he played three nights at the Rubin Museum, performing a different program each evening, in an acoustic setting. Escovedo has a similar game plan in place for this run at the City Winery—he’ll do his first two solo releases, “Gravity” (1992) and “Thirteen Years” (1994) on Thursday and Friday, then “With These Hands” (1996) on Saturday—only this time in full rock mode.” (NewYorker)
City Winery, 155 Varick St.
8pm / $35-$50
212-608-0555

Calidore String Quartet
MOZART: Divertimento in F major, K.138
CAROLINE SHAW: Entr’acte
MENDELSSOHN: String Quartet No. 2 in A minor

“We’re already in the presence of a great quartet.”—La Presse (Montreal)
David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center,
at 7:30 (but get there by 7 to ensure a seat) / Target FREE Thursdays

Elsewhere, but I love the Pendleton Round-Up and you will too. Don’t miss this:

“ROUND-UP”
imgres-1Sufjan Stevens offers a musical and cinematic portrait of the rodeo in this work, featuring new-music ensemble Yarn/Wire and gorgeous slow-motion footage of the 2013 Pendleton Round-Up in Oregon. ed note: the Round-Up is the best & most authentic of all the rodeo’s.

In this BAM commissioned work, shown on the Steinberg Screen, Stevens turns his gaze to the rodeo, in all its bull-riding, calf-roping, and barrel-racing glory. With slow-motion footage shot by sibling filmmakers Aaron and Alex Craig at the 2013 Pendleton Round-Up in Oregon—and featuring Stevens on electronics and new-music ensemble Yarn/Wire performing piano and percussion—Round-Up is a musical and cinematic portrait of a classic American tradition.
BAM’s Harvey Theatre, 651 Fulton St.
subway: #2.3 to Nevins St. (about 30 min from TimesSq.)
7:30pm / $45
bam.org / 718-636-4100

===============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
=================================================================

A PremierPub / Upper West Side

Dinosaur / 700 W125th St. @ 12th ave.

Walk only five minutes from the 125th St. station on the #1 line to find this authentic honky-tonk barbecue joint. Some folks think Dinosaur is just a place to eat ribs. Au contraire. With 24 carefully selected taps, this is a place to drink beer, and eat ribs.

HarlHostStandNo food goes better with American craft ales than American barbecue. Dinosaur may be the best combo of good beer drinking and hearty eating in town, which makes the trip uptown to West Harlem totally worthwhile.

This second incarnation of Dinosaur in Harlem is in a two story, old brick warehouse near the Hudson River. Don’t let that run down exterior fool you. Inside it’s a large space with huge, rough wooden columns and unfinished wooden floors and brick walls – just right for a bbq joint. As soon as you open the front door you are hit with that tantalizing aroma of barbecue coming from the large open kitchen. Reminds me of those great rib joints I frequented when stationed in North Carolina all those years ago. If your stomach wasn’t grumbling before, it is now.

Head to the bar, sit down and try to decide on a beer. It’s not an easy decision – a good problem to have. This is a pretty damn good beer list to choose from, one that most beer bars should be jealous of. I love that they feature NY craft beers. You may want to try the four beer sampler, which is always fun, and in this place may be necessary.

The blues music playing in the background will get you in the mood for their North Carolina style barbecue, and even when it’s a full house your order shouldn’t take too long (assuming you snagged a table). The food is all slow smoked, so it’s already mostly done and ready to go. I always start with an order of their giant, spice rubbed wings, so good they may make you give up Buffalo wings.

Unfortunately, a place this good does not fly under the radar. There can be some long waits for a table at dinnertime. So you need a strategy – avoid prime time, and try not to arrive with your entire posse, which will limit your seating options.

A seat at the bar, a small table in the bar area, or in the summer, an outside table underneath what’s left of the elevated West Side Highway, all may open before a table inside the main dining room. Otherwise, try Dinosaur for lunch, or come very late for dinner, maybe after a show at the nearby Cotton Club nightclub.

Website: http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/
Phone #: 212-694-1777
Hours: Mo-Th 11:30am-11:00pm; Fr-Sa 11:30am-12:00am;
Su 12:00pm-10:00pm
Happy Hour: 4-7pm every day; $1 off all drinks
Music: Fri / Sat 10:30pm
Subway: #1 to 125th St.
Walk 2 blk W on 125th St. to Dinosaur Bar-B-Q,
just past the elevated highway.

===========================================================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).
If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
===========================================================================================
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected Events (01/21) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s “Fab 5″ / Selected NYCity Events – WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

New York Boat Show – Special Event   (12pm-9pm)    

Culture Salon: Coffee Tasting – Food and Drink   (6:30pm)

Selected Shorts: Art and Artists – SmartStuff/ Readings   (7:30pm)

Pat Martino Organ Trio and Larry Coryell–Vic Juris Duo  
Jazz   (8pm)  (10:30pm)

Mark Greif and A.O. Scott in Conversation – SmartStuff/ Book Talk   (6:30pm)[FREE]

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
=========================================================

New York Boat Show (through Jan. 25)
335144_p_t_640x480_image01“This annual event is celebrating its 110th anniversary this year. There will be kayaks, sailboats and yachts, as well as an array of marine technologies and accessories on display. On Thursday Gary Dell’Abate, a.k.a. Baba Booey, from Howard Stern’s radio show, will be on hand, and on Friday, the New York City Fire Department will celebrate its 150th anniversary.” (NYT)

cc
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 655 West 34th St.
Wednesday through next Friday from noon to 9 p.m.,
Jan. 24 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Jan. 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
212-216-2000 / javitscenter.com.

Culture Salon: Coffee Tasting
coffee1“Take a master class in coffee at the AMNH, with tastings from from Stumptown Coffee Roasters, founded in food-and-coffee mecca Portland, Oregon. This after-hours historical and culinary journey will be led by Nick Kirby, head of Training and Education for Stumptown Coffee in New York, and includes coffees from Indonesia, Thailand, and Ethiopia expertly paired with chocolates, fruits, teas, and honeys to enhance the flavors of the coffees. Engage your senses as you taste your way through the culinary history of coffee and explore roasting and brewing techniques via hands-on stations and Museum artifacts in the Hall of Asian Peoples.

Two tastings, at 6:30pm and again at 7:30. Coffee Tastings include:
Ethiopia Duromina – Tasting Notes: Lemonade, hops and peach juice intertwine in this syrupy cup.
Bies Penantan – Tasting Notes: Clove, fernet and white pepper accents expand into a foundation of creamy cola and prune sweetened by brown sugar in this cup.
A special Thai Iced Coffee Blend” (thoughtgallery.org)
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th St.
at 6:30 pm / $40
212-769-5100

Selected Shorts: Art and Artists
thumbParker Posey, Dan Stevens, and Heather Burns perform funny, passionate, and surprising tales about art and those who make it.

The unique and eclectic mix of readings includes colorful excerpts from the new edition of The Diaries of Andy Warhol; a coming- of- age story by William Boyd (from the new Everyman’s Pocket Classics collectionStories of Art and Artists); a first-person fictional account by a Downtown minimalist artist wrestling with her work; Sheila Heti’s vibrant tale of a mermaid in a jar; new, commissioned flash fiction by Justin Torres, Helen Phillips and Dolan Morgan, written in response to Ed Ruscha’s text-based painting currently on view at the High Line; and special guests Maria Popova from BrainPickings.org and artist and filmmakerLaurie Simmons, (The Love Doll; Walking, Talking, Lying; and the upcoming Jewish Museum exhibitionHow We See) shares her artwork inspired by Heti’s story. Hosted by Matthew Love.
Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway
7:30pm / $29
212-864-5400

Pat Martino Organ Trio and Larry Coryell–Vic Juris Duo (through Jan.25.)
“There will be no shortage of finger-flying fret work at this double bill. Martino revisits and extends his musical roots with his organ trio, while Coryell, a fusion pioneer who also honors the jazz tradition, delivers duets with the fine, underrated guitarist Juris. All three are veteran players whose foundations in bebop lend authenticity to their vibrant improvising.” (NewYorker)
Blue Note, 131 W. 3rd St.
8pm and 10:30pm /
212-475-8592 / bluenote.net.

Mark Greif and A.O. Scott in Conversation
“Princeton University Press celebrates the publication of Mark Greif’s new book, “The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973.” On this evening, Mr. Greif will be joined by A.O. Scott, a chief film critic for The New York Times, for a discussion about the state of the American novel and other subjects.” (NYT)
Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, 126 Crosby St, near Houston St, SoHo,
At 7 p.m. / FREE
212-334-3324 / housingworksbookstore.org.xx

===============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
=================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Frick Collection:
‘Masterpieces From the Scottish National Gallery’ (through Feb. 1)
Sargent_2000“As it did last year with masterworks from the Mauritshuis, the Frick has welcomed 10 paintings from the Scottish National Gallery, in Edinburgh, home to a renowned collection of fine art from the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century. It’s a quieter sort of exhibition, exemplified by the under-the-radar entrance of Sargent’s “Lady Agnew of Lochnaw.” It’s also a rangier show, one that isn’t as identifiably Scottish as the Mauritshuis works were Dutch — even considering the commanding Sir Henry Raeburn portrait of a kilted Macdonell clan chief.” (Karen Rosenberg)

Jewish Museum:
‘From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945-1952’ (through Feb. 1)
TJM_646_KrasnerLewis_F15_BW-KrasnerWStopandGo“Inspired by a pairing in the museum’s 2008 show “Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning and American Art, 1940-1976,” this exhibition orchestrates a profound and sensitive conversation between Krasner and Lewis — one that takes into account their shared visual language as well as different cultural backgrounds (as a Jewish woman and an African-American man). It also suggests that both artists have long been hidden in plain sight: Krasner as the spouse of an art celebrity, Lewis as a black artist whose paintings were more formal than political.” 1109 Fifth Avenue, at 92nd Street, 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org. (Rosenberg)

Guggenheim Museum:
‘V. S. Gaitonde: Painting as Process, Painting as Life’ (through Feb. 11)
“Many Western abstract painters in the early 20th century were deeply influenced by Asian art and philosophy, though no one dismissed them as Orientalists. By contrast, if Asian artists showed signs of absorbing Western models, their work was disdained as derivative. When you visit this survey of work by Vasudeo Santu Gaitonde (1924-2001), keep that paradox in mind just long enough to see how its biases operate. Then give yourself over to some of the most magnetic abstract painting of any kind in the city right now, by a South Asian Indian modernist who looked westward, eastward, homeward and inward to create an intensely personalized version of transculturalism, one that has given him mythic stature in his own country and pushed him to the top of the auction charts.” (Cotter)

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901–1911 (through spring 2015)
ex_Kandinsky_Landscape-near-Murnau-with-Locomotive_490Early in his career Vasily Kandinsky experimented with printmaking, produced brightly-colored landscapes of the German countryside, and explored recognizable and recurrent motifs. This intimate exhibition drawn from the Guggenheim collection explores the artist’s representational origins.

Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum (continuing):
The stately doors of the 1902 Andrew Carnegie mansion, home to the Cooper Hewitt, are open again after an overhaul and expansion of the premises. Historic house and modern museum have always made an awkward fit, a standoff between preservation and innovation, and the problem remains, but the renovation has brought a wide-open new gallery space, a cafe and a raft of be-your-own-designer digital enhancements. Best of all, more of the museum’s vast permanent collection is now on view, including an Op Art weaving, miniature spiral staircases, ballistic face masks and a dainty enameled 18th-century version of a Swiss knife. Like design itself, this institution is built on tumult and friction, and you feel it. 2 East 91st Street, at Fifth Avenue, 212-849-8400, cooperhewitt.org. (Cotter)

==================================================

Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Ten museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:

• 110th Street – Museum for African Art

• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio

• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York

• 92nd Street – The Jewish Museum

• 91st Street – Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

• 89th Street – National Academy Museum

• 88th Street – Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

• 86th Street – Neue Galerie New York

• 83rd Street – Goethe-Institut

Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
• 82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Additionally, though technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 70th St. and the The Morgan Library & Museum on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave. Now plan your own museum crawl. ========================================================

For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 01/19 and 01/17.
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Selelected Events (01/20) + Today’sFeaturedNeighborhood: WestVillage

Today’s “Fab 5″+1/ Selected NYCity Events – TUESDAY, JAN. 20, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

New York City Ballet Winter 2015 – Ballet    

Brazilian Night w/ Irene Walsh – Brazilian Music   (7pm)

Peter Carey and Hari Kunzru in Conversation – SmartStuff/ Book Talk   (7pm)

Ramsch und Rosen: World music between then & now  –  World Music (6:30pm)

Fred Hersch – Jazz   (8:30pm) (10:30pm)

Making the Movie Magic – SmartStuff/ Lecture   (6:30pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
=========================================================

New York City Ballet Winter 2015 (through Mar. 01)
Today starts the NYC Ballet Winter season, don’t miss it.
Remember that day of performance discount tickets may be available at The David Rubenstein Atrium box office, with availability listed at 1:30pm each day.

Winter 2015 performances feature three all-Balanchine programs showcasing masterworks such as Serenade and La Valse, as well as the return of his two-act comedic story ballet Harlequinade (last seen in 2005) with its larger-than-life characters. In honor of our creative mission, the New Combinations program will feature a world premiere by newly-appointed Resident Choreographer Justin Peck set to Aaron Copland’s iconic Rodeo score.

Additional highlights include the return of the Jerome Robbins classic The Goldberg Variations — required viewing for all dance aficionados — and the animal instincts of The Cage, encore performances of Alexei Ratmansky’s Fall 2014 premiere Pictures at an Exhibition, and Peter Martins’ full-length Romeo + Juliet, which brings star-crossed romance to the stage just in time for Valentine’s Day.
DHK Theater, Columbus Avenue & 63rd St. south side of the Lincoln Center main plaza
nycballet.com

Brazilian Night w/ Irene Walsh
Irene Walsh on vocals
Cesar Garabini on 7-string guitar
Hadar Noiberg on flute.
Irene will be singing samba with Cesar Garabini on 7-string guitar and Hadar Noiberg on flute. They will also play some beautiful instrumental choro.

The Brazilian music series at Caffe Vivaldi happens on FIRST and THIRD TUESDAYS of the month. The series features both traditional and experimental Brazilian music by the top artists in NYC. The show is curated by Irene Walsh, producer and director at Split Rock Films. Every show is completely unique and Irene sings at least one set of classic samba at every show. Many shows are filmed and will be posted on the YouTube channel for Split Rock Film.
Caffe Vivaldi, 32 Jones St, (near Bleecker St and 7th Ave),
7PM to 10PM / $10 suggested donation for the benefit of the artists.

Peter Carey and Hari Kunzru in Conversation
“Peter Carey is special. Why? He’s one of only three other folks who’ve won the Book Prize twice. Go see this brilliant Australian novelist talk about his new book Amnesia,which could win him his third Booker Prize—who knows! ” (TONY)

Join two-time Booker winner Peter Carey for a discussion of his new novel, AMNESIA, a provocative, exuberant contemplation of cyber politics and crisis. The story of Gaby Baillieux, a hacker who releases the Angel Worm virus into the Australian prison computer system, setting free thousands of prisoners, AMNESIA not only “responds to some of the biggest issues of our time,” but “reminds us that no other contemporary novelist is better able to mix farce with ferocity, or to better effect” (The Guardian). Carey will be joined in conversation by acclaimed author of GODS WITHOUT MEN, Hari Kunzru.
McNally Jackson Books, 52 Prince Street
7pm / FREE
212-274-1160

Ramsch und Rosen: World music between then and now
Deutsches Haus presents a concert with Ramsch und Rosen, two Austrian musicians, Julia Lacherstorfer and Simon Zöchbauer, who rummage for old tunes among old paintings, manuscripts, and between the lines of old letters, finding a treasure trove of material underneath the layers of dust.

Their music bridges past and present – a past where the clocks tick differently and a present where we can connect to the entire world and choose from an immeasurable number of opinions, and pick the most precious, most suitable items for our individual character. The result: A type of unique music that is inseparable from the people who perform it. It needs to take place within them, earnestly, yet with a wink.
Deutsches Haus at NYU
6:30 p.m. / FREE, but please RSVP, space is limited

Fred Hersch (through Jan.25)
“For the concluding half of his two-week run at the Village Vanguard, the acclaimed pianist leaves his expanded ensemble at home and goes solo. Alone with his instrument, Hersch freely partakes of the lyrical wellspring that fortifies his improvising. The Vanguard holds a special place in Hersch’s heart: he’s recorded three live albums there and was the first solo pianist to headline the hallowed club.” (NewYorker)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St.
212-255-4037.

Elsewhere, but looks worth the way cool journey:
Making the Movie Magic: “THE GREAT GATSBY”.
THE ROAD TO THE GOLD COAST BY WAY OF QUEENS.
Making Movie Magic: How 1920s Astoria Came to Life in Filming The Great Gatsby One of the challenges facing Baz Luhrmann in his 2013 cinematic remake of the classic film The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, was how to recreate 1920s Queens. Robert Singleton, Executive Director of the Greater Astoria Historical Society, will describe the behind-the-scenes research and movie magic in a lecture sponsored by the Roosevelt Island Historical Society.
Roosevelt Island Library, 524 Main Street
subway: F train from 42nd St.about 15 minutes
or try the very cool roosevelt island aerial tramway

(board at tram plaza 60th St. and Second Ave)
6:30PM / FREE

=============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================

A PremierPub / West Village

Corner Bistro/ 331 W. 4th St.

Sometimes you just need a beer and a burger. If so, Corner Bistro is the place you want. Located just outside the hip Meatpacking district, this corner bar and grill is decidedly unhip, but it’s not uncrowded, especially at night. Seems that everyone knows this place has one of the better burgers in town.

kac_120405_phude_corner_bistro_bar_1000-600x450In the maze of streets known as the West Village, where West 4th intersects with West 12th (and West 11th, and West 10th, go figure), you will eventually find Corner Bistro on the corner of West 4th and Jane Street. An unassuming neighborhood tavern, it looks just like dozens of other taverns around town.

The bartender tells me that the Corner Bistro celebrated it’s 50th anniversary last year. The well worn interior tells me that the place itself is much older.

Corner Bistro has outlasted many of those other taverns around town because they know how to keep it simple — just good burgers and beer, fairly priced. The classic bistro Burger is only $6.75, and should be ordered medium rare, which will be plenty rare for most folks. Actually, it will be a juicy, messy delight – make sure you have extra napkins. I like to pull up a stool and sit by the large front window in the afternoon, where I can rest my burger and beer on the shelf, and watch the Villagers walk by.

Corner Bistro seems to attract very different groups of patrons depending on time of day. While it’s crowded with locals in the evening, in the afternoon you hear different foreign languages, and watch groups of euro tourists wander in, led by their guidebooks and smartphones.

For the classic Bistro experience, order your burger with a McSorley’s draft, the dark preferably. This is the same beer that you can get over at the original McSorley’s in the East Village, the pub that claims to be the oldest continually operating bar in NYCity. The only difference is that this McSorley’s ale is served with a smile by the bartenders here. Or you can get a Sierra Nevada, Stella, or Hoegaarden on tap if you want to go upscale a bit. Either way this is a simple, but quality burger and beer experience that is just too rare these days (sorry for the pun).
=========================================================
Website: cornerbistrony.com
Phone #: 212-242-9502
Hours: 11:30am-4am Mon-Sat; 12pm-4am Sun
Happy Hour: NO
Music: Juke Box
Subway: #1/2/3 to 14th St. (S end of platform)
Walk 2 blk W. on 13th St. to 8th Ave.; 1 blk S. on 8th Ave. to Jane St.
Update:
==============================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).

If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
==============================================================

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Selected Events (01/19) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s “Fab 5″/ Selected NYCity Events – MONDAY, JAN. 19, 2015.
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

J.P. Morgan Tournament of Champions

Harlem Gospel Choir

Steve Earle — Pop/Rock   (8pm)

Mac Conner: A New York Life

Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks — Jazz   (8pm)

For other useful and curated NYCity event info for Manhattan’s WestSide:
♦ “9 Notable Events-Jan.”, and “Top10 Free” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity trip planning see links in “Resources” and “Smart Stuff” in the header above.
♦ For NYCity Sights, Sounds and Stories visit out our sister site: nyc123blog.wordpress.com
=========================================================

J.P. Morgan Tournament of Champions (through Friday)
This annual contest returns to Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall, where the world’s top-ranked professional squash players will compete in this weeklong contest.
Ticket information and a full schedule of matches are at tocsquash.com.
Today’s matches: 11:30W; 3:00M&W; 6:30M&W
Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall

Harlem Gospel Choir (also ongoing Sundays)
download“Here’s a real Sister Act for you. When does a blues club in the middle of Times Square become a church? The answer: every Sunday for over 10 years, when the Harlem Gospel Choir takes over at BB King ’s. Hosted by founder Allen Bailey, this highly inspirational six-member mixed choir offers spiritual salvation (in the words and music of such classics as “Oh Happy Day” and “Amazing Grace”) alongside heaps of biscuits, scrambled eggs and fried fish.

The jubilant mood is much more like a church service than a traditional nightclub set—they leave the house lights on for one thing, and there’s a lot more audience participation than you’re likely to see at, say, the Blue Note. After a while, I found myself standing up, clapping and singing along, even during those rare moments when no one was asking me to.” (WSJ)

Special matinee today in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. at 12:30PM
B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, 237 W. 42nd St.
(212) 997-4144

Steve Earle (Mondays, through Jan. 26)

“This Texas singer has received a second career wind thanks to TV showrunners who aspire to his grittiness. He’s appeared either in person or through song on “The Wire,” “Longmire,” “Treme,” and most recently, “True Detective.” And like that newest series, Mr. Earle’s music is entrenched in the backwater past: bluesy slide guitars, lo-fi vocals, plenty of heart and fury. He continues his monthlong winter residency at City Winery.” (Andrew R. Chow-NYT)
City Winery, 155 Varick Street, near Spring Street, South Village,
8pm / 212-608-0555 /citywinery.com.

Mac Conner: A New York Life (through Feb. 01, 2015)
Mac1Mac McCauley (“Mac”) Conner is considered by many to be one of New York’s original “MAD Men”. Born in 1913, Conner grew up admiring Norman Rockwell magazine covers in his father’s general store. He arrived in New York as a young man to work on wartime Navy publications and stayed on to make a career in the city’s vibrant publishing industry. The exhibition presents Conner’s hand-painted illustrations for advertising campaigns and women’s magazines like Redbook and McCall’s, made during the years after World War II when commercial artists helped to redefine American style and culture.
Museum of City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, at 103rd St.
From 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.,/ $10.
(212) 534-1672 /

Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks
“If you haven’t yet checked out the Nighthawks’ new digs, what are you waiting for. “The band (which has just released their second volume of music from HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”) now actually sounds better, audio-wise, and the menu is a vast improvement over the band’s previous venue—overall, it is a step up, to the second floor, rather than a flight down, to the basement.

Although longtime fans are currently referring to the Nighthawks as “The Iguana Troubadours,” they continue to play with the same amazing combination of skin-tight historical authenticity and sheer, relentless energy, plus a tempo that has always characterized Mr. Giordano’s bands.” (WSJ-Will Friedwald)
Iguana, 240 W. 54th St., (Btw 8th/B’way)
8pm-11pm (3 sets) / $15 cover, $20 food/drink minimum
(212) 765-5454 / iguananyc.com

==============================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity (pop. 8.4 million) had 54 million visitors last year and quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
==============================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
107508‘The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’ (through March 22) In his printed works, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec chronicled and publicized the music halls, theaters, circuses, operas and cafes of Paris with terrific verve, sly wit and surprising subtlety. This enthralling show presents approximately 100 examples drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Johnson)

‘Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs’ (through Feb. 10) A popular image of the elderly Matisse is of a serene, bespectacled pasha propped up in bed and surrounded by doves and flowers. But in the years around 1940, he must have felt he was living a nightmare. He and his wife of more than four decades separated. He underwent debilitating surgery for cancer. During World War II, he fled south to Nice, only to have that city threatened with bombardment. Through everything, he worked on. It is this Matisse — the invalid, insomniac, night-worker and waking dreamer — we meet in the marvelous, victory-lap show that has arrived in New York from London, trailing light, praise and lines around the block. 212-708-9400, moma.org; admission is by timed tickets. (Cotter)

‘Sturtevant: Double Trouble’ (through Feb. 22) Among the first things you see in MoMA’s taut, feisty retrospective of the American artist Elaine Sturtevant is work by far better known figures: Joseph Beuys, Jasper Johns, Marcel Duchamp. In each case, however, the pieces are by Ms. Sturtevant herself, who spent much of a long career adopting and adapting the art and styles of others to create a body of work entirely her own, one which raises questions about the value of art, about the hows and whys of producing it, and about the degrees to which quasi-replication can be an exercise in flattery, parody, objectivity, originality and love. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Cotter)

‘The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World’(through April 5) Despite being predictable and market-oriented in its choice of 17 artists, this museum’s first painting survey in decades is well worth seeing. About half the artists are exceptional and the rest are represented by their best work. Based on the premise that all historical painting styles are equally available today, the exhibition has been smartly installed to juxtapose different approaches: figurative and abstract, digital and handmade, spare and opulent. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

New-York Historical Society:
Annie Leibovitz: ‘Pilgrimage’ (through Feb. 22) No living celebrities are portrayed in “Pilgrimage,” but lots of celebrated figures from the past are indirectly represented, from Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson to Eleanor Roosevelt and Robert Smithson. In the spring of 2009, Ms. Leibovitz set out on a two-year journey that took her to about two dozen historic sites in the United States and Britain. Most of these were house museums dedicated to famous individuals, where she photographed the rooms they inhabited and objects they owned and used. Though often poetically atmospheric, these pictures are disappointingly less lively than her portraits of famous entertainers. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Johnson)

Skyscraper Museum:
TS84_IntroWall‘Times Square, 1984: The Postmodern Moment’ (last day)
In this smart, pithy show, 20 architectural panels capture the essence of another show, the “Times Tower Site Competition” held by New York’s Municipal Art Society 30 years ago, when over 500 architects made proposals for the famous triangular site in Times Square. Philip Johnson and John Burgee were proposing a suave 4.2 million-square-foot ensemble of four skyscrapers that would help “clean up” the surrounding urban squalor, and they favored an open square at the center of their project. The Municipal Art Society protested the proposal by asking for alternatives to replace the Times Tower. The dispute proved a turning point in New York’s urban history and, more broadly, in American architectural history, as the postmodernism of the Johnson towers gave way to a highly eclectic, free-for-all postmodernism devoid of his mansards or triumphal arches. 39 Battery Place, Lower Manhattan, 212-968-1961, skyscraper.org. (Joseph Giovannini)

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