Notable NYC Events-June

June Highlights/Events

Coming This Week – Mon 06/12 – Sun 06/18
(per Village Voice “Datebook”)
“Datebook” is a rolling, continually updated, 7 day listing of events that is top notch – bookmark it and check it out regularly – I do.

MON 6/12

ART
The Arcades: Contemporary Art and Walter Benjamin
Admirers of the philosopher Walter Benjamin have reason to celebrate this summer: His unfinished magnum opus, The Arcades Project, forms the centerpiece of an exhibition at the Jewish Museum that explores the stamp of his legacy across today’s visual-arts landscape. The Arcades Project analyzed modernity by focusing on the shopping passages of nineteenth-century Paris: labyrinthine avenues stretched between streets, roofed with iron and glass, lined with storefronts to attract passersby — all a bit reminiscent of modern-day Chelsea Market. The exhibition features an idiosyncratic collection of artists (such as Milena Bonilla, Voluspa Jarpa, Cindy Sherman, and Chris Burden), each of whose work appears as a response to one of the thematic sections, or “convolutes,” of Benjamin’s text. (Kenneth Goldsmith’s poetic annotations also make an appearance.) It’s a tiny exhibit, but you’ll want to take your time idling through these jam-packed rooms. Imitate Benjamin’s beloved figure of the flâneur — that leisurely saunterer of sidewalks, caught up in a reverie of browsing — and bring a turtle on a leash.
—Joseph Cermatori
JEWISH MUSEUM
11AM
FREE–$15
MORE INFO

ART
Anish Kapoor: Descension
Anish Kapoor, to his enormous credit, is the rare contemporary artist who begins not with concepts, but with style. Whatever ideas emerge from his art come later, from the look of the thing, the way it feels and how it hits the senses. Although Kapoor tends toward a clean, spare, graceful style, there is often something overwhelming to his work. That’s certainly the case with “Descension,” an endless whirlpool that disappears into the earth, now installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Much of its power comes from the tremendous and ominous hum it generates, which most people will notice before they even lay eyes on it. If there is a drawback, it’s the location: Brooklyn Bridge Park is anodyne and clean, which blunts some of Kapoor’s force. Still, the installation introduces a dose of aesthetic anxiety into any visitor’s day, which alone is commendable.
—Pac Pobric
BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK, PIER 1
9AM
FREE
MORE INFO

THEATER
Ghost Light
Theatrical polymaths Zach Morris and Jennine Willett of Third Rail Projects, responsible in part for the long-running immersive Brooklyn shows Then She Fell and The Grand Paradise, finally bring their unique imaginations and their seventeen-member company, co-creators of this piece, to Manhattan’s Lincoln Center in Ghost Light, a “performance about performance” that takes participants across the footlights and into the world beyond the proscenium. The eponymous lamp traditionally stands alone in the middle of a stage, preventing it from going completely dark, warding off accidents, and, hey, thwarting evil spirits. Wear comfortable shoes; the two-hour production involves standing and walking on uneven surfaces, climbing stairs, and likely being trapped alone in a confined space. Currently in previews (and opening June 19), it runs without intermission, contains partial nudity, and offers a second late show on Friday and Saturday nights.
—Elizabeth Zimmer
CLAIRE TOW THEATER
7PM
$30+
MORE INFO

FILM
Varda in California
In a line from Agnès Varda’s 1969 Lions Love (…and Lies) that defines the French essayist extraordinaire’s work abroad in California, actress and director Shirley Clarke states that Varda “never know[s] whether [she is] in a movie or making one.” Both are one and the same; the real and cinematic worlds melt into a nearly indivisible whole animated by Varda’s foreigner’s curiosity. For Varda, opportunity lies everywhere: tracing her own far-off family connections in Sausalito (1967’s Uncle Yanco); navigating the margins of Los Angeles’s loneliness-breeding urban sprawl (1981’s Documenteur); traveling to Oakland for a Black Panther demonstration (1968’s Black Panthers); meditating on the color, culture, and diversity of L.A. murals (1980’s Mur Murs); and, perhaps most poignantly, sending up the era-appropriate excess and counterculture of the Hollywood Hills, all while breaking the fourth wall to achieve something as exquisite and simple as a shared breath (Lions Love). All these works feature in BAMcinématek’s two-week survey of Agnès Varda’s California.
—Samuel B. Prime
BAMCINÉMATEK
8PM
FREE–$14
MORE INFO

MUSIC
Feist
In the much simpler time of the year 2007, Britney shaved her head, Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, and Feist’s inescapable “1234” went from beloved to cloying to oh-my-god-enough-already (thanks in part to its appearance in a commercial for another Jobs product, the iPod). Meanwhile, the album “1234” appeared on, The Reminder, catapulted Leslie Feist from indie darling to Sesame Street–cameoing heavyweight. (In the Voice in 2007, Garrett Kamps wrote of that record: “What a great batch of simple, precisely arranged love songs — expertly produced, delectably sung.”) This year, Feist returned with her first new work in six years, the much anticipated Pleasure, on which the quirky pop of her early career is replaced by angsty drums (“Century,” featuring Jarvis Cocker) and fuzzy blues (the title track) à la PJ Harvey. There’s also quieter acoustic material (“Baby Be Simple”) and lo-fi jazz (“The Wind”). In support of the effort, Feist plays a three-night stand at Town Hall.
—Jill Menze
THE TOWN HALL
8PM
$40–$60
MORE INFO

TUE 6/13

THEATER
A Hunger Artist
Operating at the intersection of puppetry and physical theater, Sinking Ship Productions makes work that can be both playful and contemplative. Their new creative adventure is the darkly comic A Hunger Artist, a stage adaptation of the same-named Franz Kafka story. Hunger artists were a real-life phenomenon — fasting performers in a kind of nineteenth-century sideshow attraction where they would put themselves on display for viewers enticed by the prospect of watching people waste away through feats of controlled starvation. Inspired by the Kafka tale of one such artist, this vaudeville-style production uses puppets, Victorian miniatures, and even some audience participation. The crowd is encouraged to reflect on their own acts of consumption and spectatorship, and how they enable and abet artists hungering for such attention, whether detrimentally or not. Entertainment, at this show, comes at a steep internal cost.
—Nicole Serratore
CONNELLY THEATER
8PM
$15–$35
MORE INFO

ART
August Sander
August Sander’s photographs of a German society unaware of the impending catastrophe of the Second World War bitterly echo the unforeseeability of the present sociopolitical climate. Capturing singular or assembled individuals with his ardent yet inquisitive lens, Sander gives viewers an earnest peek at the Weimar Era through portraits of working-class and vagabond figures. These men and women, invisible to the affluent socialites of Twenties Berlin, studiously pose and vividly resist vanishing in their natural habitat; the artist’s adept use of natural light and then-progressive printing techniques imbue them with briskness and detail. With descriptive titles referring to each poser’s occupation or status, the forty images — of farmers, dwellers, nuns, street musicians, and more — complete an overall portrait of a nation according to Sander. The artist later expanded his quest in People of the Twentieth Century, his 619-print tour de force chronicling the joys and dismays of daily life across all strata of German society.
—Osman Can Yerebakan
HAUSER & WIRTH, 69TH STREET
10AM
FREE
MORE INFO

ART
Frank Stella
When Frank Stella was just starting out, in the Sixties, he developed a clear, austere painting style. Although he spurned the label, he was the original minimalist, and certainly the most influential one. He could have kept at it, but he got bored — and brave. What else could he say with such a reduced vocabulary? Since the Seventies, he has steadily moved from minimalism to maximalism. His current show, at Marianne Boesky, is outlandish: One enormous work made of aluminum and plastic looks like a colorful Martian insect covered in antennae. If you asked Stella, he’d say works like this are structurally related to the monochrome paintings he made nearly sixty years before, though that’s a difficult case to sustain. The newer output is not as strong, but Stella deserves recognition for his refusal to churn out easier, cooler material.
—Pac Pobric
MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY
10AM
FREE
MORE INFO

DANCE
L.A. Dance Project
Benjamin Millepied, who turns forty this week, was an early star at the School of American Ballet and the New York City Ballet. He choreographed and danced in the notorious Black Swan, then married his screen colleague Natalie Portman. He founded this distinguished repertory troupe in Los Angeles in 2012, went off to a thorny three-year stint as director of the Paris Opera Ballet, and is now back in California, from whence he brings two programs of promising work. The first, opening Tuesday, June 13, includes Ohad Naharin’s Yag and two of Millepied’s own dances, the 2014 Hearts & Arrows and the world premiere of In Silence We Speak. The second bill, playing in repertory starting Wednesday, June 14, reprises Silence and features Justin Peck’s Murder Ballades, a MinEvent by Merce Cunningham, and Millepied’s Orpheus Highway.
—Elizabeth Zimmer
JOYCE THEATER
7:30PM
$10+
MORE INFO

WED 6/14

COMEDY
Cole Escola: Help! I’m Stuck
Armed with excellent wigs and regional accents, the comedian Cole Escola (Difficult People, Mozart in the Jungle) is set to begin his monthly summer residency at Joe’s Pub. (Following this week’s rendition on Wednesday, Escola will return to perform again on July 10 and August 16.) It is safe to declare Escola one of the rulers of the alternative-comedy scene, with his slew of manic characters (Hot Southern Baby, Extremely Frustrated Anchorwoman) and popular YouTube videos (for a solid example, consult his sketch of an orange juice commercial featuring a suburban mom with a dark past). In this solo piece, Escola will unleash new personalities who, he promises, will “operate on the fringes of coherence and social acceptability.” Caught productively between comedy and cabaret, Escola’s fresh commentaries and energetic ruthlessness will leave audiences enamored of his absurdity.
—Natalia Hadjigeorgiou
JOE’S PUB
9:30PM
$15
MORE INFO

ART
Ellsworth Kelly: Last Paintings and Plant Drawings
When Ellsworth Kelly died in December 2015, at age 92, he left hanging in his studio ten paintings, nine of which were finished. Among them was a two-part, monochrome diptych — one green panel, one blue — that bears a remarkable likeness to another work he painted in 1962. It was no accident: Kelly often looked back to favored ideas from times past as a way into something new. His final nine completed paintings are now the subject of a show at Matthew Marks; next door, the gallery is also presenting a suite of sixteen of Kelly’s plant drawings, from between 1949 and 2008. Like his larger abstract paintings, these are remarkably consistent; it would be difficult, based on style alone, to date any one of them, a fact that’s a tribute to the clarity of Kelly’s vision.
—Pac Pobric
MATTHEW MARKS GALLERY
10AM
FREE
MORE INFO

FOOD & DRINK
Meet the Master
From copper stills and oak barrels come the brown spirits that line the shelves of the Lower East Side’s Copper & Oak, which possesses a library-dense selection of better than six hundred spirits (mainly whiskey). The little Allen Street joint has been around for about three years, serving cocktails, hosting tastings, and becoming a go-to destination for rare and refined bottles. With their “Meet the Master” tasting series, they open up space for curious drinkers to sample various tipples and receive insight from experts — all for free. This week, on Wednesday, June 14, get a feel for rhum agricole with Rhum HSE from Martinique, served up by Emilie Campesato-Mouragne.
—Alicia Kennedy
COPPER & OAK
6PM
FREE
MORE INFO

MUSIC
ZZ Ward
The singer-songwriter ZZ Ward, who’s poised to make a raucous return later this month with the release of sophomore full-length The Storm, has endured her share of creative ups and downs. In 2012, she had a major breakout with Eleven Roses, a mixtape of reimagined hip-hop covers that helped her connect with high-profile collaborators like Kendrick Lamar and Freddie Gibbs. Her Criminal EP and debut, Til the Casket Drops, quickly followed, but Ward struggled to produce a second full-length, scrapping material for a promised 2015 LP (This Means War) and releasing a truncated EP (Love & War) instead. Judging from early Storm singles like “The Deep” (which features Joey Purp) and the gospel-infused “Help Me Mama,” it’s clear that Ward’s trial by fire has given this blue-eyed soul siren some extra heat
—Lindsey Rhoades
LE POISSON ROUGE
8PM
$25–$95
MORE INFO

MUSIC
Man Forever
One of the city’s preeminent drummers (art-rock division), John Colpitts goes by Kid Millionaire when playing with marathon minimalists Oneida and by Man Forever when performing solo. On his new Play What They Want, Colpitts teams up with Yo La Tengo, Laurie Anderson, harpist Mary Lattimore, Trans Am guitarist Phil Manley, and others, in short and long pieces that feature the percussionist in constantly shifting perspectives ranging from discreet background emulsification (in the Nick Mason sense) to relentlessly dynamic front-and-center percussive maximalism. Colpitts also writes and sings in a manner evocative of retired prog-rock drumming icon Robert Wyatt, especially when he’s crooning lines like, “This world isn’t very nice but you chose to ignore it” (on “Debt and Greed”). The delightfully fidgety Brooklyn prog-pop trio Celestial Shore opens.
—Richard Gehr
BROOKLYN MUSIC SCHOOL THEATER
8PM
$12–$15
MORE INFO

THU 6/15

FILM
Duel in the Sun
Some years after constructing the mammoth Gone With the Wind (1939), producer David O. Selznick tried to best himself by erecting this bewildering cinematic shrine to his wife Jennifer Jones. The bloated result, Duel in the Sun (1946), envisions a scorching western setting to match the wild passions of its protagonist, a mestiza named Pearl (Jones). The central narrative places Pearl in a lust triangle with a modern-day Cain and Abel, played respectively by slithering Gregory Peck and haughty Joseph Cotton. While credited to King Vidor (one of a half-dozen directors who worked on the production), this is Selznick’s picture, featuring the best and the worst of his bombastic Hollywood pomposity. The key remains Jones, who gives the film its spunky humor and pierced intensity, amplifying the Freudian undertones all the way to its mountainous climax between a girl and a gun.
—Peter Labuza
MUSEUM OF MODERN ART
1:30PM
FREE–$12
MORE INFO

THEATER
Nowhere Man
One of pop culture’s most enduring conspiracy theories holds that the guy claiming to be Paul McCartney for the last fifty years or so is in fact an imposter, the real Beatle having died sometime between Revolver and Sgt. Pepper. Claude Solnick’s new play at Theater for the New City covers a smaller timespan. McCartney lookalike Billy Campbell (John Anthony Gorman) only gets to play Beatle for 100 days after a car accident sidelines the genuine article in the mid-Sixties; fictionalized versions of Fab Four handlers George Martin (Ed Altman) and Neil Aspinall (Tyler Beau Humphries) are mixed up in the ruse as well. Beyond the potential for farce and hugger-mugger, the premise raises issues of identity, manufactured images, and the way celebrity can make a figure omnipresent and vacant at the same time.
—Zac Thompson
THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY
8PM
$15–$18
MORE INFO

THEATER
A Hunger Artist
Operating at the intersection of puppetry and physical theater, Sinking Ship Productions makes work that can be both playful and contemplative. Their new creative adventure is the darkly comic A Hunger Artist, a stage adaptation of the same-named Franz Kafka story. Hunger artists were a real-life phenomenon — fasting performers in a kind of nineteenth-century sideshow attraction where they would put themselves on display for viewers enticed by the prospect of watching people waste away through feats of controlled starvation. Inspired by the Kafka tale of one such artist, this vaudeville-style production uses puppets, Victorian miniatures, and even some audience participation. The crowd is encouraged to reflect on their own acts of consumption and spectatorship, and how they enable and abet artists hungering for such attention, whether detrimentally or not. Entertainment, at this show, comes at a steep internal cost.
—Nicole Serratore
CONNELLY THEATER
8PM
$15–$35
MORE INFO

DANCE
L.A. Dance Project
Benjamin Millepied, who turns forty this week, was an early star at the School of American Ballet and the New York City Ballet. He choreographed and danced in the notorious Black Swan, then married his screen colleague Natalie Portman. He founded this distinguished repertory troupe in Los Angeles in 2012, went off to a thorny three-year stint as director of the Paris Opera Ballet, and is now back in California, from whence he brings two programs of promising work. The first, opening Tuesday, June 13, includes Ohad Naharin’s Yag and two of Millepied’s own dances, the 2014 Hearts & Arrows and the world premiere of In Silence We Speak. The second bill, playing in repertory starting Wednesday, June 14, reprises Silence and features Justin Peck’s Murder Ballades, a MinEvent by Merce Cunningham, and Millepied’s Orpheus Highway.
—Elizabeth Zimmer
JOYCE THEATER
8PM
$10+
MORE INFO

ART
Calder: Constellations
It is odd today to think of a time when mobile existed only as an adjective, but it wasn’t until 1931, when Marcel Duchamp christened Alexander Calder’s unorthodox hanging sculptures as “mobiles,” that the term came to life as a noun. For two more weeks you can walk through the Pace Gallery and see it transformed into a galaxy of the colorful biomorphic forms, all created during and just after the Second World War, a time of great personal unrest for Calder. (Many of his close friends were overseas, including the painter Joan Miró; a sister exhibit, “Miró: Constellations,” featuring works by that artist created during the same era, closed three weeks ago.) The war forced Calder to experiment with wood rather than his usual muse, sheet metal, a medium that was obviously in shortage at the time. The experiment paid off: The mobiles gathered here, some suspended and others mounted to the wall, have a kinetic, starry energy to them.
—Sarah Edwards
PACE GALLERY
10AM
FREE
MORE INFO

MUSIC
Ella Vos
A compelling new voice buoyed by the instant popularity of her Soundcloud-released singles, the Los Angeles–based electronic pop performer Ella Vos uses personal narratives to relay ideas with a political bent. Her “White Noise,” which has an eerie, Handmaid’s Tale–esque music video, subtly highlights new mothers’ struggles with postpartum depression; “You Don’t Know About Me” combats the gendered criticism constantly aimed at women’s bodies, whether from sitting legislators or from everyday catcallers. Vos is yet unsigned, but she’s destined for huge venues, so catch her intimate Mercury Lounge set, which follows a debut appearance at Bonnaroo, while her star is still on the rise.
—Lindsey Rhoades
MERCURY LOUNGE
9:15PM
$10–$12
MORE INFO

FRI 6/16

FILM
Simian Vérité
With Kong: Skull Island lumbering into the distance and War for the Planet of the Apes looming on the horizon, Anthology Film Archives presents “Simian Vérité,” featuring a dozen films that explore the durable cinematic presence of our closest relatives in the animal kingdom. Guest-programmed by the critic Steve Macfarlane, the series includes everything from interspecies sex satire (Nagisa Oshima’s Max Mon Amour, 1986) to screwball comedy (Howard Hawks’s Monkey Business, 1952) to videostore horror (George Romero’s Monkey Shines, 1988). And as the program’s title would imply, there’s a fair amount of documentary — from Frederick Wiseman’s unusually polemical film about animal test subjects, Primate (1974), to Barbet Schroeder’s three-hankie portrait, Koko, a Talking Gorilla (1978). But the real emphasis is on monster movies, including Gojira creator Ishiro Honda’s King Kong Escapes (1967); Dino De Laurentiis’s mildly horny 1976 Kong remake; and the Shaw Brothers’ delirious cash-in, Mighty Peking Man (1977). Throw in a little beer-drinkin’ and ass-kickin’ with Clint and Clyde (Every Which Way but Loose, from ’78) and you have a series that’s more fun than, well, lots of things.
—Leo Goldsmith
ANTHOLOGY FILM ARCHIVES
7PM, 9PM
$7–$11
MORE INFO

MUSIC
New York Philharmonic: Concerts in the Parks
Crying babies, squabbling siblings, and chatting neighbors add background value to the New York Philharmonic’s annual “Concerts in the Parks.” Part of a year-long initiative, this summer’s series focuses on Antonin Dvořák’s Symphony no. 9 in E Minor, From the New World. Composed while Dvořák was working in New York in the early 1890s, this musical meditation on America is a fascinating hybrid of influences including Native-American dances, African-American spirituals, and a trip to the Great Plains. Before the program, music director Alan Gilbert will conduct a community performance of “Goin’ Home,” inspired by the symphony’s Largo movement; bring your voice, kazoo, or any other instrument and prepare to wail. The evening concludes with Leonard Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances From West Side Story, George Gershwin’s An American in Paris, and fireworks.
—Richard Gehr
PROSPECT PARK
8PM
FREE
MORE INFO

SAT 6/17

DANCE
Sally Silvers: Tenderizer
For her new Tenderizer, a three-part work, choreographer Sally Silvers, working as always with a live sound-mix by her partner, Bruce Andrews, scrambles a flock of superb performers from an astonishing range of disciplines and generations: tap master Caleb Teicher, Cunningham alums Melissa Toogood and Dylan Crossman, postmodern pillar Paul Langland, and a dozen more. Known for finding visual poetry in the oddest places and translating it from various other media into dance, Silvers has been working for close to forty years, on her own pieces and those of others, yet her work still has the quality of having been ripped from the headlines — not the idiocy that bedevils us on a daily basis, but the stuff that really matters, like art and philosophy, brilliant filmmaking and rock ’n’ roll.
—Elizabeth Zimmer
ROULETTE
8PM
$15–$25
MORE INFO

FOOD & DRINK
Mushrooming 101
Can you tell the difference between wild mushrooms that are delicious and wild mushrooms that are poisonous? If not, here’s a chance to learn, in a special setting. Gary Lincoff, who wrote The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms and who teaches mushroom-identification courses at the New York Botanical Garden, will lead a tour around the 478-acre Green-Wood Cemetery and help you ID the funky fungi sprouting among the tombstones and mausoleums. Once you’ve gleaned a thing or two about foraging, you can expand your parameters and hunt for some of the nearly one thousand species of mushrooms that can be found in parks throughout the five boroughs.
—Mary Bakija
GREEN-WOOD CEMETERY
11AM
$15
MORE INFO

ART
The Art of Spider-Man
If there’s one superhero you expect to see on a wall, it’s Spider-Man — and now, he’s all over the walls of the Society of Illustrators. Is the show good? Listen, bud: “The Art of Spider-Man” is the largest collection of original Spidey pages ever displayed, primarily focused on the sleek, elegant style of John Romita, but spanning the wall-crawler’s earlier, wiry days under the pen of co-creator Steve Ditko on through the intricate webwork of Todd McFarlane (who came on the Spidey scene in the late Eighties). Artists like Gil Kane, John Romita Jr., and Keith Pollard also provide scenes of the webhead facing off against his deadliest foes. Face it, tiger: If you’re a fan of the Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man, you’ve just hit the jackpot.
—Rob Staeger
SOCIETY OF ILLUSTRATORS
11AM
FREE–$15
MORE INFO

DANCE
Dances for a Variable Population
Naomi Goldberg Haas, originally a ballet dancer and now the city’s doyenne of dance training for older adults and a pro at generating funding from all levels of government, has for a decade masterminded outdoor productions for which legendary dancer-choreographers make new work for senior performers. She proudly offers Revival, celebrating great twentieth-century modern dance in pieces created by the artists who helped to make it — veterans of the troupes of Martha Graham, Paul Taylor, Alvin Ailey, and Charles Moore. Among them are Ellen Graff, George Faison, Stuart Hodes, Marnie Thomas Wood, Elizabeth Keen, Ramona Candy, and Goldberg Haas herself. In among the neighborhood seniors are ringers Alice Teirstein, Laura Glenn, and Chet Walker.
—Elizabeth Zimmer
GRANT’S TOMB
6PM, 7:30PM
FREE
MORE INFO

SUN 6/18

MUSIC
The Lemon Twigs
The Lemon Twigs’ Brian and Michael D’Addario aren’t your average pair of teenage brothers from the suburban sprawl of Hicksville, Long Island, a sluggish town of diners and identical strip malls. The two occasionally come off like an early-Seventies pop duo with a hit that’s climbing the charts — glittery makeup; flared pants; faded, midriff-exposing T-shirts; and Rod Stewart–esque post-mod haircuts all included. Their rock music, with pop melodies and clever lyricism, reflects this aesthetic; it’s lush and vibrant, vivid and eccentric, like a Technicolor dream. The Lemon Twigs have been compared to giants like the Beatles, the Beach Boys, or the Rolling Stones, but the D’Addario brothers are something new. Get acquainted with their theatrical pop rock at this high-energy free show.
—Amara Thomas
THE SURF LODGE
6PM
FREE
MORE INFO

FILM
Great Expectations
It’s tempting to find Great Expectations lacking in plot but having a most definite course, punctuated by bizarre obstacles, opening in a graveyard and culminating in an act of defiance against the prison of heartbreak and mourning. Young Pip spends much of Great Expectations being bullied, bruised, insulted, condescended to, and misled, but if asked to name the story’s villain, most will struggle to remember a name. Though they may often be unfriendly, the most vivid figures who orbit Pip’s youth and young adulthood — such as Miss Havisham, Estella, and the convict Magwitch — tend to serve as vivid totems of the strange world, beset by malice and rank poverty, but infused with curiosity and wonderment. David Lean’s celebrated 1946 adaptation is well drawn and propelled with a vigorous confidence; it’s a heroic act of illustration, towering over a dozen subsequent adaptations.
—Jaime N. Christley
FILM FORUM
11AM
$8–$14
MORE INFO

FOOD & DRINK
Egg Rolls, Egg Creams, & Empanadas Festival
This sixteen-year-old festival celebrates several of the many diverse communities that have historically called the Lower East Side home. Inside the historic Eldridge Street Synagogue, which houses the Museum at Eldridge Street, visitors can learn how to make kreplach, dumplings, and empanadas through interactive food demos, and see examples of Chinese, Jewish, and Puerto Rican folk arts and how they’re crafted. Additional entertainment includes musical performances by groups like the Chinatown Senior Center Orchestra, games of mah-jongg, and opportunities to try out traditional arts and crafts. Of course, the event wouldn’t be complete without a taste of some egg rolls, egg creams, and empanadas, all of which will be available for purchase.
—Mary Bakija
MUSEUM AT ELDRIDGE STREET
12PM
FREE
MORE INFO

PRIDE
Out Like That! Festival
For nearly two decades, the Out Like That! Festival has been an exuberant space for Bronxites to observe Pride Month. This year, the two- week event includes “#No- Tension2017” (June 18), a showcase honoring queer creatives from the South Asian diaspora, hosted by Desi drag queen LaWhore Vagistan. The following day, Kiara St. James, director of the New York Trans Advocacy Group, and Jamal T. Lewis, director of the documentary No Fats, No Femmes, will facilitate an installment of the Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance’s monthly “Courageous Conversations” series, an open forum in which queer people can talk about how to navigate and thrive in the current political climate. Additionally, there will be two theater shows: I Just Love Andy Gibb (June 22–23), about two characters engaged in a time-hopping conversation, and Non-Consensual Relationships With Ghosts (June 24), a satire that explores the “urgency to resist and survive.”
—Deonna Anderson
BRONX ACADEMY OF ARTS AND DANCE
2PM, 4PM
FREE–$20
MORE INFO

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MUSIC IN JUNE
from City Guide NY / Things to Do in NYC: Nightlife

(6/3) Mavis Staples/Toshi Reagon at Central Park Summerstage. 6pm-10pm.

(6/2-6/4) Music fans gather for the Governor’s Ball 2017 at Randall’s Island Park, with a lineup including Tool, Lorde, Chance the Rapper, Phoenix, Wu-Tang Clan, Cage the Elephant, Wiz Khalifa, Mac DeMarco and many others.

(6/9) The Chainsmokers w/Emily Warren, Kiiara, Lost Frequencies at Forest Hills Stadium.

(6/9) The Buzzcocks at Webster Hall.

(6/10) Dance up a storm at The 33rd Annual New York Salsa Festival at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. The event will feature Willie Colón, Eddie Palmieri, Tito Nieves, Grupo Niche, Fruko y sus Tesos, Tito Rojas, DLG, Eddie Santiago and more!

(6/10) New York City Bourbon Mash. Various venues. nycbourbonmash.com.

(6/10-6/11) Jazz Age Lawn Party at Governors Island.

(6/11) George Clinton and P Funkadelic perform free in *Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, part of Summerstage. 5pm-8pm.

(6/12, 6/17) Swan Lake at the Metropolitan Opera.

(6/13-6/14) Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds at Beacon Theatre.

(6/14) Jack Johnson at Forest Hills Stadium.

(6/15) Elvis Costello and the Impostors at Central Park Summerstage.

(6/16) Double bill treat! Hall & Oates and Tears for Fears at Forest Hills Stadium.

(6/16) Jazz & CHIHULY: A special evening concert series in conjunction with New York Botanical Garden’s CHIHULY exhibit. Tonight: The French Connection, with an ensemble led by trumpeter Alphonso Horne and Parisian chanteuse Camille Bertault. $45pp. 6:30-10:30pm.

(6/16) Brew at the Bronx Zoo. Round two is going to be bigger and better. From 6 to 7:30 p.m. grizzly bears, giraffes, lemurs, sea lions and more will be on exhibit. Stop by and see your favorites before the unlimited beer tastings begin. At 7 p.m. we’ll start pouring samples of over 100 varieties of wine and beer, so you can find a new favorite or enjoy a classic.

(6/17) Mermaid Parade at Coney Island The Mermaid Parade is the nation’s largest art parade and one of New York City’s greatest summer events. 1pm.

(6/17) Sigur Ros at Forest Hills Stadium.

(6/21) Chanteuse Diana Krall performs at the Beacon Theatre.

(6/24-6/25) Pinknic Festival at Governors Island. Following the runaway success of Pinknic’s 2016 debut, New York City’s largest rosé picnic and music festival returns to Governors Island this June for a two-day summer fête. 2017’s Pinknic is going to be full to the brim with delectable food, lively entertainment, and, of course, everyone’s favorite pink drink.

(6/27-6/28) Crooner John Legend performs at The Theater at Madison Square Garden.

(6/28) Sheryl Crow’s Be Myself Tour stops at the Beacon Theatre.

(6/29-6/30) Cassandra Wilson performs at the Blue Note.

MUSIC IN JUNE
from Time Out NY;

The 1975
The bratty, likably bombastic British synth-popsters of the 1975 come from Manchester (the birthplace of the Smiths, the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays) and are somewhat of a big deal in their homeland, and increasingly in the States as well: The band’s sophomore album, I Like It When You Sleep, for You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It, topped the charts in both countries upon its release last year.
Madison Square Garden , Midtown West Thursday June 1 2017

Governors Ball;
Randalls Island Park; June 2–4; 3-day admission $305, 1-day admission $105
The annual Randalls Island event is the one of the best local fests, hosting top talent from an array of genres over three days. Catch hip-hop rising stars (Chance the Rapper, Childish Gambino), pop sounds of every ilk (from moody Lorde to pop-rock Phoenix), atmospheric, dreamy rock (Air, Beach House) and more. Friday, June 2, 2017 to Sunday, June 4, 2017

Ween; Brooklyn Steel; June 6, 7; $59.50
For the band’s sizable fan base, every Ween concert is a holy event—especially in the light of its long-awaited reunion last year. The Pennsylvanian institution’s ability to project its virtuosic talent onto virtually any genre and goofily make it its own is worth the price of admission, even if you haven’t drunk the Kool-Aid.
Brooklyn Steel , Williamsburg Tuesday June 6 2017 – Wednesday June 7 2017

Lake Street Dive
This wildly popular string band offers sweet, earthy, surprisingly rock & rolly songs—and plucky covers—that encompass classic soul, R&B and pop motifs, but it’s singer Rachael Price’s gorgeous, rich voice that will stop you in your tracks. The Boston outfit performs behind a new LP, Side Pony.
Prospect Park Bandshell , Windsor Terrace Wednesday June 7 2017

Northside Festival; various locations; June 7–11; music badge $75
Unlike its big-tent big-stage brethren, this fest opts for the CMJ approach—presenting several concerts and showcases at various venues across the city. The result is a diverse week-long experience that hosts rising local acts alongside globally renowned artists (as well as tech events to boot).

Astor Blaster Silent Disco Astor Place Cube; Jun 9; free
Don’t forget the Alamo—the official name of the Astor Place “Cube”—as it turns 50. Celebrate with a free silent dance party. You’ll don wireless headphones (provided on a first come, first serve basis) to get down to three live DJs—or pop on your own headset and dance to the beat of your own drummer before the party continues with specials at local bars.

Girlpool; Warsaw; June 9; $18
As folk-punk duo Girlpool, high school friends Harmony Tividad and Cleo Tucker weave complex vocal interplay—unison shouts along with lilting harmonies—above spare guitar melodies. The spare arrangement leaves every note exposed—a fitting framework for the radically vulnerable lyrics found on 2015’s excellent release, Before the World Was Big.
Warsaw , Greenpoint Friday June 9 2017

Land of Talk
This Montreal band plays small-scale indie-rock songs of desperate emotion (generally poignancy) and a youthful air. The band had been on hiatus for half a decade, until announcing this year’s newest, Life After Youth.
Bowery Ballroom , Lower East Side Wednesday June 14 2017

Dawes
This rootsy Los Angeles band features brothers Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith, the sons of Tower of Power singer Lenny Goldsmith. Their new album, We’re All Gonna Die, sounds like an ode to the Laurel Canyon music scene of the early ’70s.
Brooklyn Steel , Williamsburg Wednesday June 14 2017

Sorority Noise; Music Hall of Williamsburg; June 15; $15
+ Forth Wanderers + The Obsessives + Shannen Moser
Connecticut’s positively cathartic Sorority Noise writes mature lyrical exorcisms of addiction and depression. The band’s scream-along choruses somehow make key changes sound somehow oh-so-punk-rock, rather than Bon Jovi-cringeworthy. Music Hall of Williamsburg , Williamsburg Thursday June 15 2017

The Shins
Though this indie institution has undergone fundamental transformations in recent years, there’s no mistaking the essential Shins-iness of the band’s latest Heartworms: Once again we find James Mercer pondering life’s big questions in long-lined vocal melodies floating over jangly, detailed guitar-pop arrangements. Here the Portland, OR, indie-rock faves open the summer season with a Celebrate Brooklyn! benefit show.
Prospect Park Bandshell , Windsor Terrace Thursday June 15 2017

Brazilian Jazz and Tango Special;
Highline Ballroom; June 17 at 12:30pm; tickets start at $71
Groove to live bossa nova and nuevo tango music while sipping mimosas at this brunch concert. Argentinian guitarist Andres Laprida will showcase the best of South American jazz in a tribute to some of the the genre’s greats.

Midsummer Night Swing; Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center; Starts June 27; $20 day of
For three weeks this summer, folks can twist, turn and twirl under the stars to jams provided by incredible live bands and artists such as The Legendary Count Basie Orchestra, Binky Griptite, Loser’s Lounge, Harlem Renaissance Orchestra, Joe Bataan and others at Damrosch Park. Although the term “swing” is included in the title of the main event, each one of the 15 bashes covers a specific genre of dance, including disco, ballroom, salsa and more. You can also attend a late-night Silent Disco on select nights!

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The June 2017 Calendar: Events for Each Day This Month
published by ThoughtGallery.org

“Discover Hundreds of Upcoming NYC Talks, Readings & More”
If you are a fertile thinker or just a little bit curious,, there is no better site than ThoughtGallery.org to find out what’s happening for the mind in NYCity.

Thursday, June 1: Persist at this World Science Festival event on Women in Science with neuroscientist and Big Bang Theory actress Mayim Bialik. Ace Hotel.

Friday, June 2: Feel alive at Engineering Immortality?, an event exploring the science behind our expanding life spans and the consequences of immortality. NYU Global Center.

Saturday, June 3: Hearken to professor of behavioral and evolutionary biology Kevin Laland as he speaks on “How Culture Transformed Human Evolution,” a look at animal traditions, humanity’s rise from scavenger apes, and the unique qualities of “intelligence, language, teaching, and cooperation” that make us human. Jefferson Market Library.

Sunday, June 4: Tap into your inner flâneur and stroll to The Jewish Museum for Paris Capital of the 19th Century / New York Capital of the 20th Century, a day of artistic collaborations inspired by Walter Benjamin’s The Arcades Project.

Monday, June 5: Stave off vampires at this lecture on the surprising history of garlic, from its medicinal past to flavorful present. The New York Academy of Medicine.

Tuesday, June 6: Spend a day in the life at All You Need is the Summer of Love, a conversation on the Summer of Love and its soundtrack, including The Beatles’ landmark live telecast. Paley Center for Media.

Wednesday, June 7: Make a snap judgment on Alexander Todorov, who explains why we put so much stock in our quick reads of faces—and why we’re so often wrong. The latest in psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, and computer science help tell the story. (So does award-winning actress Ellen Burstyn.) Rubin Museum of Art.

Thursday, June 8: Head down to the water at the Queer History of Brooklyn’s Waterfront, which explores the area’s LGBT population from the 1800s through the postwar era. Brooklyn Historical Society.

Friday, June 9: Control your temper at Mad in America, a discussion on America’s collective madness and what we can do about it. NYU School of Law.

Saturday, June 10: “Go-wan” and explore one of Brooklyn’s less-heralded areas on this walking tour down the Gowanus Canal. Prospect Heights Brainery.

Sunday, June 11: Say hola to a new perspective on our southern neighbor at this discussion on Mexico’s political and societal transformations over the past 30 years. 92nd Street Y.

Monday, June 12

>Go beyond the frontlines at GRUNT: The Curious Science of Humans at War, which delves into the lesser-seen aspect of war: staying alive. The New York Academy of Medicine.

>Catch a Film Society of Lincoln Center screening of the documentary Complicit, which follows Chinese factory migrant worker-turned-activist Yi Yeting and his fight against the global electronic industry. A panel discussion will follow.

Tuesday, June 13

>If the heat wave isn’t gross enough for you, catch The Society for the Advancement of Social Studies and a trio of free talks. On the docket? Superfund sites, how not to respond to an epidemic (that would be congress, AIDS, and gross incompetence), and ambergris—the whale puke that turns beachcombers into millionaires.

>“Everything is amazing and nobody is happy,” in Louis C.K.’s famous formulation. The promise of the efficiencies of technology have paid out as massive time sucks. Hear from Julia Hobsbawm, the author of Fully Connected: Surviving and Thriving in an Age of Overload, as she presents some practical suggestions for balancing the flow of knowledge with social health. 92nd Street Y.

>Be a bad feminist at this discussion with author Roxane Gay on her latest book, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body. Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM).

Wednesday, June 14

>The In Situ collaboration between Creative Time and New York Public Library returns with poet Eileen Myles and Jezebel founder Anna Holmes. Their conversation will be followed by a performance from JD Samson (MEN, Le Tigre).

>Rembrandt’s conveying of both calm and luminosity mark his 1646 canvas Abraham Entertaining the Angels, newly on display at The Frick. The curator of the exhibition delves into artist and painting in a free talk, “Rembrandt, Abraham, and the Dynamics of Revelation.”

>There’s no soup for you at this discussion of Psychoanalyzing Seinfeld with Sherry Amatenstein and Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, who will look at their recent books and the many neuroses of the sitcom’s characters. Book Culture.

Thursday, June 15

>September will see the arrival of the next Ken Burns exploration, a 10-part documentary on the Vietnam War. He’ll speak about the project and the war’s lingering impact at a TimesTalks panel. Burns will be joined by his frequent collaborator Lynn Novick, editorial page editor of the New York Times James Bennet, and authors Karl Marlantes and Duong Van Mai Elliott. Merkin Concert Hall.

>Get on the beat at this discussion with legendary composer Philip Glass in honor of his 80th birthday. New York Public Library – Stephen A. Schwartzman Building.

>The psychology of being placed in New York City—from surfing the chaos of a midtown avenue to enveloping pockets downtown—is often tangible. A new book by architecture critic Sarah Williams Goldhagen reveals recent discoveries in cognitive psychology and neuroscience that show the ways built environments impact our memories, emotions, and well-being. Find her in conversation at the Center for Architecture.

Friday, June 16: Walk the path with Way of the Peaceful Warrior author Dan Millman, who presents teachings from the sequel, The Hidden School. New York Open Center.

Saturday, June 17: Fight against the Hellmouth at What Would Buffy Do?, a critical look at Joss
Whedon’s groundbreaking show and the feminism of its titular character. The Footlight Bar.

Sunday, June 18: Stay healthy for this hardhat tour of Ellis Island’s hospital complex, which has sat abandoned for over 60 years. New York Adventure Club.

Monday, June 19: Make an exception for Exceptional America: What Divides Americans From the World and Each Other, an examination of America’s deep polarization and idea of its own exceptionalism. 92nd Street Y.

Tuesday, June 20: Spend a cultural night out at Night at the Museums, an evening of free admission and special offerings at 15 of lower Manhattan’s museums and historic sites.

Wednesday, June 21: Dig deeper into a portrait of genius with an NYU professor’s session on Albert Einstein (he’ll employ Einstein’s thought experiment techniques so his thinking can be understood with a minimum of mathematics). New York Institute of Technology.

Thursday, June 22: Expose yourself to the work of artist Lissa Rivera and her muse BJ Lillis at this conversation about their new work “Beautiful Boy.” New York Public Library – Mid-Manhattan Library.

Friday, June 23: Head through the concrete jungle of Manhattan to Man’s Separation from Nature and Where to Go from Here, an event with philosopher Manuel Rodeiro on our unsustainable relationship with nature. The Strand.

Saturday, June 24: See the final resting place of numerous famed New Yorkers on this tour of GreenWood Cemetery.

Sunday, June 25: Explore a little-known Art Deco gem at this behind-the-scenes tour of Temple EmanuEl, one of the world’s largest synagogues. Temple Emanu-El.

Monday, June 26: It’s in the stars that you’ll attend this introduction to the world of astrology. Brainery Annex.

Tuesday, June 27: The pen is mightier than the sword at Weaponizing Words, which examines the art of letter writing as an act of activism. Nowadays.

Wednesday, June 28: Go beyond the news and challenge stereotypes at Who Is Muslim?, a panel discussion with Muslim-American men and women. Brooklyn Historical Society.

Thursday, June 29: Separate fact from fiction at Real/Fake Science, an interactive salon filled with “alternative facts” and fascinating truths. Union Hall.

Friday, June 30: Get into a rhythm at this installment of Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Jazz 101 series, which focuses on jazz today and how the form evolved into the 21st century. Jazz at Lincoln Center

 

More to come.