Selected NYC Events (02/25) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events>SATURDAY/FEB.25, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Duchess
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S./ 6PM, no cover
Duchess is on the last night of it’s 4 night run celebrating their new CD, “Laughing at Life”, There will be special guests, there will be kazoos, there will be swinging #girlongirlharmony. Don’t miss it! I need to say it again. Don’t miss it!

Opening night’s crowd burst 55 Bar at the seams, and their special guest was Anat Cohen, one of America’s great clarinet players. Fantastic!

“Three fine singers—Melissa Stylianou, Amy Cervini, and Hilary Gardner—join together in swinging harmony to whip up music that traffics in delight. Referencing vocal icons from Peggy Lee to the Boswell Sisters, this fresh-voiced triumvirate plays it straight from the heart, leaving any trace of camp or postmodern irony at the door. They have played way more upscale places, but Duchess seems to shine best in this basement joint.” (NewYorker)

6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

MICHAEL MWENSO AND THE SHAKES
MS. LAURYN HILL
SAM NEWSOME QUARTET
Leslie Jones
The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration
Cyrus Chestnut Quartet

Plus Continuing Events:
HARKNESS DANCE FESTIVAL
The Orchid Show

==============================================================

Music, Dance, Performing Art

MICHAEL MWENSO AND THE SHAKES
at Ginny’s Supper Club / 7:30PM, 9:30PM, $15
“The vocalist Michael Mwenso was born in Sierra Leone and developed his affinity for jazz while growing up in London. Onstage he is intense, prowling, ebullient; he referred to himself in an interview with NPR as “a human acoustic D.J.,” and he functions as convener and ringleader as much as singer. The Shakes are his rotating cast of musicians and associates, often including other vocalists and even tap dancers. The ensemble’s repertoire pulls from early jazz and classic funk, as well as more contemporary sounds.”
(NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

MS. LAURYN HILL
at Radio City Music Hall / 7:30PM, $62.50+
“In recent years Ms. Hill, the Grammy-winning singer, has earned a reputation for unpredictability by arriving hours late to some gigs while hitting the stage promptly at others. In a 2016 Facebook post, she described her difficulty “aligning my energy with the time, taking something that isn’t easily classified or contained, and trying to make it available for others.” One thing that is certain about a Ms. Lauryn Hill show: She delivers rousing sets, often including soul-stirring classics like “Fu-Gee-La,” “Ready or Not” and the Fugees’ cover of Roberta Flack’s “Killing Me Softly.” She has also sprinkled recent shows with terrific covers of songs by Sade, Bob Marley and Cy Grant. Should she decide to delay her arrival, it will be worth the wait.” (NYT-KEVIN O’DONNELL)

SAM NEWSOME QUARTET
at Smalls / 10:30PM, $20
“Mr. Newsome plays the soprano saxophone, most of the time alone. After starting his career as a straight-ahead tenor saxophonist, he took a left turn — soaking up inspiration from the Arab world, sub-Saharan Africa and Japan, and focusing mostly on the solo soprano saxophone. But this weekend at Smalls, he appears in a quartet with three of the strongest voices in creative music: the pianist Angelica Sanchez, the bassist Mark Helias and the drummer Gerald Cleaver.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Leslie Jones (Feb. 23 to 26)
Carolines, 1626 Broadway / 7:30PM, 10PM, $65.50,
“Whether you know and love this comedian from “Saturday Night Live” or follow her religiously on Twitter, don’t miss this opportunity to see the hilarious Leslie Jones in person.” (AMNY)

The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration (thru Feb.26)
Dizzy’s Club, Broadway at 60th St./ 7:30PM, 9:30PM, $45
“Gordon enjoyed an unexpected late-career resurgence with his Oscar-nominated appearance in the 1986 film “Round Midnight,” but he first made his mark decades earlier, as the tenor saxophonist who best embodied Charlie Parker’s bebop message. Gordon’s music continued to evolve from there, with influential results, and this tribute will touch on various aspects of his illustrious catalogue, including work from his albums “Homecoming” and “Sophisticated Giant,” from the late nineteen-seventies. Leading the band—which includes the saxophonist Abraham Burton—on the first two nights will be Gordon’s confederate, the great hard-bop drummer Louis Hayes.” (NewYorker)

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet (last night)
Birdland, 315 W44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $40
“Chestnut’s piano has a tactile quality that assures you you’ve picked the right spot for the night. Mixing high spirits and soulful, deeply satisfying improvisation touched by gospel music and by the blues, Chestnut is a trusted stylist who has judiciously balanced mainstream and modernist leanings since he arrived on the scene, in the late nineteen-eighties. Here, he plays with the bassist Buster Williams and the drummer Lenny White, the same rhythm team that makes his recent album “Natural Essence” a treat; additional support comes in the form of the noteworthy vibraphonist Steve Nelson.” (NewYorker)

And don’t forget these continuing events:

HARKNESS DANCE FESTIVAL (Feb. 24 through March 25)
at the 92nd Street Y / 8PM, $25+
“This five-week festival celebrates its 23rd season with “Then, Now & Next,” a series highlighting several companies in classic and new works. New York Theater Ballet, a chamber group led by Diana Byer, who formed the group in 1978, is up first with the program “Legends and Visionaries,” scheduled for Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 4 and 8 p.m. It spotlights two works by Martha Clarke, the pas de trois from “The Garden of Villandry” (1979) and “Nocturne” (1978), a portrait of an aging ballerina. The evening also includes three ballets by Antony Tudor: “Soirée Musicale” (1938), “Les Mains Gauches” (1951) and the pas de deux from “The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet” (1943). In keeping with the sensibilities of Mr. Tudor, a choreographer of supreme restraint, it’s subtle, not showy. And at 3 p.m. on Sunday, the festival dives into the world of George Balanchine with “Dance Talk: Patricia Wilde, George Balanchine and the Rise of New York City Ballet.” (NYT-Gia Kourlas)

The Orchid Show (thru April 09)
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

=======================================================
Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite non jazz music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Town Hall – 123 W43rd St., thetownhall.org, 212-997-6661
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

=======================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

=======================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
‘FROM THE COLLECTION: 1960-1969’ (through March 12)
“MoMA shakes up its sanctum sanctorum, installing half of its permanent collection galleries with works chosen by 17 curators from a single decade: the tumultuous 1960s. The limited time frame is balanced by unprecedented breadth and variety. As never before, the presentation mixes together objects and artworks from all six of the museum’s curatorial departments. The blend is alternately stimulating and bewildering, revelatory and infuriating: yet another symptom of the museum’s limited curatorial mind-set. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Smith)

‘FRANCIS PICABIA: OUR HEADS ARE ROUND SO OUR THOUGHTS CAN CHANGE DIRECTION’ (through March 19).
“The restless career of one of the great provocateurs of early modernism finally gets its due from the Museum of Modern Art, healthfully perturbing that institution’s emphasis on linear progress and creative genius with radically shifting styles and tones. His lush, large-scale Cubist paintings; machine-based images; Dada anti-art and magazines; several returns to figuration; and final abstract styles are all present and give no quarter.” (Smith)

 ‘TONY OURSLER: IMPONDERABLE’ (through April 16)
“This small exhibition is centered on a 90-minute film in which episodes from the history of spiritualist frauds and hoaxes are re-enacted by people in fanciful costumes while mystic flames, smoke and ectoplasmic phenomena come and go. At certain moments during “Imponderable,” you feel breezes wafting over you and hear loud thumping under the theater’s risers. The crudeness of these effects is part of the generally comical spirit. It’s all about the confusion between illusion and reality to which human beings seem to be congenitally susceptible.” (Johnson)

And a special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

FAST FORWARD: PAINTING FROM THE 1980S (thru May 14)
“Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s presents a focused look at painting from this decade with works drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection.

In the 1980s, painting recaptured the imagination of the contemporary art world against a backdrop of expansive change. An unprecedented number of galleries appeared on the scene, particularly in downtown New York. Groundbreaking exhibitions—that blurred distinctions between high and low art—were presented at alternative and artist-run spaces. New mediums, including video and installation art, were on the rise. Yet despite the growing popularity of photography and video, many artists actively embraced painting, freely exploring its bold physicality and unique capacity for expression and innovation.

The exhibition includes work by artists often identified with this explosive period—Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and Julian Schnabel—as well as by several lesser-known painters. These artists explored the traditions of figuration and history painting, and offered new interpretations of abstraction. Many addressed fundamental questions about artmaking in their work, while others took on political issues including AIDS, feminism, gentrification, and war. In the face of a media-saturated environment, artists in the 1980s recommitted to painting. Far from dead, painting came to represent an important intersection between new ways of seeing and a seemingly traditional way of making art.”

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right sidebar dated 02/23 and 02/21.
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Selected NYC Events (02/24) + Today’s Featured Pub (Upper WestSide)

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events>FRIDAY/FEB.24, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Duchess
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S./ 6PM, no cover
Duchess is on the 3rd of it’s 4 night run celebrating their new CD, “Laughing at Life”, There will be special guests, there will be kazoos, there will be swinging #girlongirlharmony. Don’t miss it! I need to say it again. Don’t miss it!

Opening night’s crowd burst 55 Bar at the seams, and their special guest was Anat Cohen, one of America’s great clarinet players. Fantastic!

“Three fine singers—Melissa Stylianou, Amy Cervini, and Hilary Gardner—join together in swinging harmony to whip up music that traffics in delight. Referencing vocal icons from Peggy Lee to the Boswell Sisters, this fresh-voiced triumvirate plays it straight from the heart, leaving any trace of camp or postmodern irony at the door. They have played way more upscale places, but Duchess seems to shine best in this basement joint.” (NewYorker)

6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
HARKNESS DANCE FESTIVAL
DANIEL SLOSS
Kelly Burke: Love for Sale
The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration
Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff
Free Friday Evenings @ The Morgan

Plus Continuing Events:
NEW YORK CITY BALLET
Cyrus Chestnut Quartet
The Orchid Show

==============================================================

Music, Dance, Performing Art

HARKNESS DANCE FESTIVAL (Feb. 24 through March 25)
at the 92nd Street Y / 8PM, $25+, may have to wait list tonight’s performance
“This five-week festival celebrates its 23rd season with “Then, Now & Next,” a series highlighting several companies in classic and new works. New York Theater Ballet, a chamber group led by Diana Byer, who formed the group in 1978, is up first with the program “Legends and Visionaries,” scheduled for Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 4 and 8 p.m. It spotlights two works by Martha Clarke, the pas de trois from “The Garden of Villandry” (1979) and “Nocturne” (1978), a portrait of an aging ballerina. The evening also includes three ballets by Antony Tudor: “Soirée Musicale” (1938), “Les Mains Gauches” (1951) and the pas de deux from “The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet” (1943). In keeping with the sensibilities of Mr. Tudor, a choreographer of supreme restraint, it’s subtle, not showy. And at 3 p.m. on Sunday, the festival dives into the world of George Balanchine with “Dance Talk: Patricia Wilde, George Balanchine and the Rise of New York City Ballet.” (NYT-Gia Kourlas)

DANIEL SLOSS (also Feb.25)
at the SoHo Playhouse / 8PM, $30
“Mr. Sloss, a Scottish comedian who began performing stand-up as a teenager, has evolved over the last decade away from cheery, observational comedy and into darker, more confrontational material. His shows blend the narrative-heavy style of British performances with the punchiness of American stand-up, and there’s a pathos even in his raunchier bits. He’s currently on an international tour with his new show, “So?” (NYT- ELISE CZAJKOWSKI)

Kelly Burke: Love for Sale
Huron Club, 17 Vandam St./ 5PM, $40
image-1“English singer-actor Burke makes her U.S. debut in a “cabaret-play” set in the 1930s, featuring songs by Kurt Weill and others. The winning Charlie Alterman costars as her pianist.” (TONY)

“Developed for London’s historic Wilton’s Music Hall, and following sell-out performances in London and Edinburgh, Love for Sale is a 1930’s cabaret celebrating the music of Kurt Weill, Cole Porter and their contemporaries. Featuring OffWestEnd Award nominee Kelly Burke and Broadway musical director Charlie Alterman (Pippin, Next to Normal).
“A heartfelt, stylish show – as intelligent as it is decadent” The List

The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration (thru Feb.26)
Dizzy’s Club, Broadway at 60th St./ 7:30PM, 9:30PM, $40
“Gordon enjoyed an unexpected late-career resurgence with his Oscar-nominated appearance in the 1986 film “Round Midnight,” but he first made his mark decades earlier, as the tenor saxophonist who best embodied Charlie Parker’s bebop message. Gordon’s music continued to evolve from there, with influential results, and this tribute will touch on various aspects of his illustrious catalogue, including work from his albums “Homecoming” and “Sophisticated Giant,” from the late nineteen-seventies. Leading the band—which includes the saxophonist Abraham Burton—on the first two nights will be Gordon’s confederate, the great hard-bop drummer Louis Hayes.” (NewYorker)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave./ 12PM, $25
“Join Professor Edward Balleisen as he takes us on a journey through fraud in America — and the evolving efforts to combat it — from the age of P. T. Barnum through the eras of Charles Ponzi and Bernie Madoff.”

Free Friday Evenings @ The Morgan
The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue
“Relax and enjoy free Friday evenings at the Morgan from 7 PM to 9 PM. The instrumental ensemble BeBimBop performs jazz infused with Brazilian and Spanish flair from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM.”

And don’t forget these continuing events:

NEW YORK CITY BALLET (through Feb. 26)
at NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 8PM, $30+
“The company wraps up its winter season with one program paying homage to the choreographer Jerome Robbins and another, “Broadway to Ballet,” that celebrates Richard Rodgers. In the case of Robbins, the program is a glorious trifecta: “Glass Pieces,” set to Philip Glass’s energizing composition; “Moves,” a mesmerizing ballet performed to silence; and “The Concert,” his delightful comic ballet. The Rodgers program features Christopher Wheeldon’s sweeping “Carousel (a Dance),” a distillation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic, as well as Peter Martins’s “Thou Swell.” To be frank, it’s less than swell. But stick it out for Balanchine’s “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue,” which was originally created for the 1936 Rodgers and Hart musical “On Your Toes.” It keeps you there, still.” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet (thru Feb.25)
Birdland, 315 W44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $40
“Chestnut’s piano has a tactile quality that assures you you’ve picked the right spot for the night. Mixing high spirits and soulful, deeply satisfying improvisation touched by gospel music and by the blues, Chestnut is a trusted stylist who has judiciously balanced mainstream and modernist leanings since he arrived on the scene, in the late nineteen-eighties. Here, he plays with the bassist Buster Williams and the drummer Lenny White, the same rhythm team that makes his recent album “Natural Essence” a treat; additional support comes in the form of the noteworthy vibraphonist Steve Nelson.” (NewYorker)

The Orchid Show (thru April 09)
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

==================================================
Bonus NYC Events – Jazz Clubs:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village (all six are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – 55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

==================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats in advance at these top NYC events, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):
================================================================================

A PremierPub / Upper West Side

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que / 700 W125th St. @ 12th ave.

Walk only five minutes from the 125th St. station on the #1 line to find this authentic honky-tonk barbecue joint. Some folks think Dinosaur is just a place to eat ribs. Au contraire. With 24 carefully selected taps, this is a place to drink beer, and eat ribs.

HarlHostStandNo food goes better with American craft ales than American barbecue. Dinosaur may be the best combo of good beer drinking and hearty eating in town, which makes the trip uptown to West Harlem totally worthwhile.

This second incarnation of Dinosaur in Harlem is in a two story, old brick warehouse near the Hudson River. Don’t let that run down exterior fool you. Inside it’s a large space with huge, rough wooden columns and unfinished wooden floors and brick walls – just right for a bbq joint. As soon as you open the front door you are hit with that tantalizing aroma of barbecue coming from the large open kitchen. Reminds me of those great rib joints I frequented when stationed in North Carolina all those years ago. If your stomach wasn’t grumbling before, it is now.

Head to the bar, sit down and try to decide on a beer. It’s not an easy decision – a good problem to have. This is a pretty damn good beer list to choose from, one that most beer bars should be jealous of. I love that they feature NY craft beers. You may want to try the four beer sampler, which is always fun, and in this place may be necessary.

The blues music playing in the background will get you in the mood for their North Carolina style barbecue, and even when it’s a full house your order shouldn’t take too long (assuming you snagged a table). The food is all slow smoked, so it’s already mostly done and ready to go. I always start with an order of their giant, spice rubbed wings, so good they may make you give up Buffalo wings.

Unfortunately, a place this good does not fly under the radar. There can be some long waits for a table at dinnertime. So you need a strategy – avoid prime time, and try not to arrive with your entire posse, which will limit your seating options.

A seat at the bar, a small table in the bar area, or in the summer, an outside table underneath what’s left of the elevated West Side Highway, all may open before a table inside the main dining room. Otherwise, try Dinosaur for lunch, or come very late for dinner, maybe after a show at the nearby Cotton Club nightclub.

Website: http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/
Phone #: 212-694-1777
Hours: Mo-Th 11:30am-11:00pm; Fr-Sa 11:30am-12:00am;
Su 12:00pm-10:00pm
Happy Hour: 4-7pm every day; $1 off all drinks
Music: Fri / Sat 10:30pm
Subway: #1 to 125th St.
Walk 2 blk W on 125th St. to Dinosaur Bar-B-Q,
just past the elevated highway.
========================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).

If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a  comment. 
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected NYC Events (02/23) + GallerySpecialExhibits: Chelsea

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events>THURSDAY/FEB.23, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Duchess
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S./ 7PM, no cover
Duchess is on the 2nd of it’s 4 night run celebrating their new CD, “Laughing at Life”, There will be special guests, there will be kazoos, there will be swinging #girlongirlharmony. Don’t miss it! I need to say it again. Don’t miss it!

Last night’s crowd burst 55 Bar at the seams, and their special guest was Anat Cohen, one of America’s great clarinet players. Fantastic!

“Three fine singers—Melissa Stylianou, Amy Cervini, and Hilary Gardner—join together in swinging harmony to whip up music that traffics in delight. Referencing vocal icons from Peggy Lee to the Boswell Sisters, this fresh-voiced triumvirate plays it straight from the heart, leaving any trace of camp or postmodern irony at the door. They have played way more upscale places, but Duchess seems to shine best in this basement joint.” (NewYorker)

6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration
LAURIE ANDERSON AND CHRISTIAN McBRIDE
Cyrus Chestnut Quartet
Henry Threadgill, Vijay Iyer, and Dafnis Prieto
Matthew Jones–Reckoning with Matter: Calculating Machines, Innovation, and Thinking About Thinking From Pascal to Babbage
A History of New York City Transportation: From Horsecars to Helicopters

Plus Continuing Events:
NEW YORK CITY BALLET
The Orchid Show
RAVI COLTRANE
MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY

==============================================================

Music, Dance, Performing Art

The Music of Dexter Gordon: A Celebration (thru Feb.26)
Dizzy’s Club, Broadway at 60th St./ 7:30PM, $40
“Gordon enjoyed an unexpected late-career resurgence with his Oscar-nominated appearance in the 1986 film “Round Midnight,” but he first made his mark decades earlier, as the tenor saxophonist who best embodied Charlie Parker’s bebop message. Gordon’s music continued to evolve from there, with influential results, and this tribute will touch on various aspects of his illustrious catalogue, including work from his albums “Homecoming” and “Sophisticated Giant,” from the late nineteen-seventies. Leading the band—which includes the saxophonist Abraham Burton—on the first two nights will be Gordon’s confederate, the great hard-bop drummer Louis Hayes.” (NewYorker)

LAURIE ANDERSON AND CHRISTIAN McBRIDE
at the Town Hall / 8PM, $42+
“Perhaps the pre-eminent straight-ahead jazz bassist of the last 20 years, Mr. McBride performed recently at the Village Vanguard alongside the avant-garde stalwarts John Zorn and Milford Graves. It was an unusual setting for him, and something notable happened: His playing, always husky and swinging and commanding, took on a fresh sense of possibility. Here he continues his flirtation with the outré, appearing in an improvised duet with Ms. Anderson, the fabled experimental musician and multimedia artist. Her songs draw upon incantation and repetition — sometimes issuing subtle social critiques, other times simply heightening the senses.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet (thru Feb.25)
Birdland, 315 W44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $40
“Chestnut’s piano has a tactile quality that assures you you’ve picked the right spot for the night. Mixing high spirits and soulful, deeply satisfying improvisation touched by gospel music and by the blues, Chestnut is a trusted stylist who has judiciously balanced mainstream and modernist leanings since he arrived on the scene, in the late nineteen-eighties. Here, he plays with the bassist Buster Williams and the drummer Lenny White, the same rhythm team that makes his recent album “Natural Essence” a treat; additional support comes in the form of the noteworthy vibraphonist Steve Nelson.” (NewYorker)

Henry Threadgill, Vijay Iyer, and Dafnis Prieto
Jazz Gallery, 1160 Broadway, at 27th St., 5th fl./ 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $30-$45
The saxophonist Threadgill, the pianist Iyer, and the drummer Prieto, three progressive players, have much in common—not least, that each is deeply committed to advancing the state of present-day jazz, incorporating outside sources ranging from world music to classical. At seventy-three years old, Threadgill may be the nominal patriarch, but he’s sure to make his adventurous younger cohorts sweat.” (NewYorker)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Matthew Jones–Reckoning with Matter: Calculating Machines, Innovation, and Thinking About Thinking From Pascal to Babbage
Book Culture, 536 W. 112th St./ 7PM, FREE
“Professor of Contemporary Civilization Matthew L. Jones looks at calculating machines, from the work of Pascal to Babbage. In examining a rich record of thought, he’ll reveal a world of engineers and philosophers with a superior creative ethos to what dominates our culture today.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

Elsewhere, but this sure looks worth the detour:

A History of New York City Transportation: From Horsecars to Helicopters
Prospect Heights Brainery, 190 Underhill Ave., Bklyn / 8:30PM, $10
“By some estimates, for every New Yorker you see walking around on the streets, there’s one New Yorker underground, riding the train. That’s right – 1/2 of New York’s population is on some form of public transportation at any given moment.

This miraculous statistic means that the city we know truly couldn’t exist without its subways, buses, and taxis, but how did all this heavy, stinky, old-fashioned infrastructure get built?

This class covers NYC transportation from the early days, when the best you could hope for was a mud-spattered omnibus ride, through the first steam-powered elevated railroads, all the way up to the Pan Am building helicopter shuttle. It also touches on the many ambitious, zany, quixotic efforts to get us from Point A to Point B. Have you ever been sucked through a tunnel?”

And don’t forget these continuing events:

NEW YORK CITY BALLET (through Feb. 26)
at NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, $30+
“The company enters the homestretch of its winter season with a selection of works by Jerome Robbins, one of its founding choreographers. That program (Tuesday and Thursday) includes the bracing “Glass Pieces,” driven by the repetitive structures of its Philip Glass score; “Moves,” a ballet in silence; and “The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody),” a comedy set at a piano recital. Wednesday brings a trio of Broadway-inspired ballets danced to the music of Richard Rodgers, including Balanchine’s “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue.” (NYT-SIOBHAN BURKE)

The Orchid Show
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

RAVI COLTRANE (Feb. 21-26)
Jazz Standard, / 7:30PM, + 9:30PM, $
(Feb. 25, additional performance at 11:30 p.m.).
“Mr. Coltrane has a warbling sound that’s as thick as ink on the tenor and soprano saxophones. He’s a passionate, whole-body player, but his impulse is to obscure: His stippled, scattering tunes don’t give you a lot of melodies or rhythms to latch on to. Instead they immerse you in his disposition: poised, meditative, bold. Mr. Coltrane appears here with Adam Rogers on guitar, Dezron Douglas on bass and E. J. Strickland on drums.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY (Feb.14-26)
at the Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave., at 19th St./ 8PM, $56-$76
imgres“With classic works by Martha Graham and pieces by four contemporary choreographers — Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Annie-B Parson, Pontus Lidberg and Nacho Duato — the Graham company hosts a two-week season with the theme “Sacred/Profane.” The runs includes premieres by Mr. Cherkaoui, who takes on Sufi mysticism, and Ms. Parson, who is inspired by Graham’s “Punch and the Judy,” a comic work from 1941. Promisingly, there is text by the witty Will Eno.

But the real attraction comes in the Graham masterworks, especially “Primitive Mysteries” (1931), an all-female dance divided into three sections that explores the virgin myths of the American Southwest. There are also sections from the haunting “Dark Meadow” (1946) and Act II from “Clytemnestra” (1958), as well as some lighter fare, including the always lovely “Diversion of Angels” (1948) and the comic work “Maple Leaf Rag” (1990).” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

=====================================================
Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village (all six are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

==================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

================================================================================

Chelsea Art Gallery District*

Chelsea is the heart of the NYCity contemporary art scene. Home to more than 300 art galleries, the Rubin Museum, the Joyce Theater and The Kitchen performance spaces, there is no place like it anywhere in the world. Come here to browse free exhibitions by world-renowned artists and those unknowns waiting to be discovered in an art district that is concentrated between West 18th and West 27th Streets, and 10th and 11th Avenues. Afterwards stop in the Chelsea Market, stroll on the High Line, or rest up at one of the many cafes and bars and discuss the fine art.

R

==========================================================

For a listing of 25 essential galleries in the Chelsea Art Gallery District, organized by street, which enables you to create your own Chelsea Art Gallery crawl, see the Chelsea Gallery Guide (nycgo.com) Or check out TONY magazine’s list of the “Best Chelsea Galleries” and click through to see what’s on view.

*Now plan your own gallery crawl, but better to plan your visits for Tuesday through Saturday; most galleries are closed Sunday and Monday.

TIP: After your gallery tour, stop in Ovest at 513W27th St. for Aperitivo Italiano (Happy Hour on steroids). Discuss all the great art you have viewed over a drink and a very tasty selection of FREE appetizers (M-F, 5-8pm).

=======================================================
For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see recent posts in right sidebar dated 02/21 and 02/19.
======================================================

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selected NYC Events (02/22) + Today’s Featured Pub (WestVillage)

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events>WEDNESDAY/FEB.22, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

IVAN NEVILLE PIANO SESSIONS – MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION
Blue Note Jazz Club / 8PM, +10:30PM, $15-$25
imgres “Ivan Neville will debut his “Piano Sessions” at the Blue Note for 3 nights only, 2 shows each night featuring special sets of songs from his solo albums, rare covers, traditional Nola music reinvented and much more. He will be accompanied by bass player Nick Daniels and drummer Raymond Weber.

New Orleans-born keyboardist, singer and songwriter, Ivan Neville’s music career began as a teenager performing alongside his father, Aaron, and his uncles, Art, Charles and Cyril in the Neville Brothers. In 1988, his first solo record, If My Ancestors Could See Me Now, landed him a Top 40 Billboard hit with “Not Just Another Girl.”

6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet
Henry Threadgill, Vijay Iyer, and Dafnis Prieto
RAVI COLTRANE
NEW YORK CITY BALLET
Speaking American: How Y’all, Youse , and You Guys Talk: A Visual Guide
An Evening with Al Gore

Plus Continuing Events:
The Orchid Show
MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY

==============================================================

Music, Dance, Performing Art

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet (thru Feb.25)
Birdland, 315 W44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $40
“Chestnut’s piano has a tactile quality that assures you you’ve picked the right spot for the night. Mixing high spirits and soulful, deeply satisfying improvisation touched by gospel music and by the blues, Chestnut is a trusted stylist who has judiciously balanced mainstream and modernist leanings since he arrived on the scene, in the late nineteen-eighties. Here, he plays with the bassist Buster Williams and the drummer Lenny White, the same rhythm team that makes his recent album “Natural Essence” a treat; additional support comes in the form of the noteworthy vibraphonist Steve Nelson.” (NewYorker)

Henry Threadgill, Vijay Iyer, and Dafnis Prieto (also Thur.)
Jazz Gallery, 1160 Broadway, at 27th St., 5th fl./ 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $30-$45
The saxophonist Threadgill, the pianist Iyer, and the drummer Prieto, three progressive players, have much in common—not least, that each is deeply committed to advancing the state of present-day jazz, incorporating outside sources ranging from world music to classical. At seventy-three years old, Threadgill may be the nominal patriarch, but he’s sure to make his adventurous younger cohorts sweat.” (NewYorker)

RAVI COLTRANE (Feb. 21-26)
Jazz Standard, / 7:30PM, + 9:30PM, $
(Feb. 25, additional performance at 11:30 p.m.).
“Mr. Coltrane has a warbling sound that’s as thick as ink on the tenor and soprano saxophones. He’s a passionate, whole-body player, but his impulse is to obscure: His stippled, scattering tunes don’t give you a lot of melodies or rhythms to latch on to. Instead they immerse you in his disposition: poised, meditative, bold. Mr. Coltrane appears here with Adam Rogers on guitar, Dezron Douglas on bass and E. J. Strickland on drums.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

NEW YORK CITY BALLET (through Feb. 26)
at NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, $30+
“The company enters the homestretch of its winter season with a selection of works by Jerome Robbins, one of its founding choreographers. That program (Tuesday and Thursday) includes the bracing “Glass Pieces,” driven by the repetitive structures of its Philip Glass score; “Moves,” a ballet in silence; and “The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody),” a comedy set at a piano recital. Wednesday brings a trio of Broadway-inspired ballets danced to the music of Richard Rodgers, including Balanchine’s “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue.” (NYT-SIOBHAN BURKE)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Author @ the Library:
Speaking American: How Y’all, Youse , and You Guys Talk: A Visual Guide
with Josh Katz, graphics editor at “The New York Times.”
Mid-Manhattan Library / 6:30PM, FREE
“This illustrated lecture is a delightful exploration of American language, taking the audience on an extraordinary and beautiful tour through the American vernacular.”

An Evening with Al Gore
Temple Emanu-El, 1 E. 65th St./ 7:30PM, $45
“It’s been over a decade since former Vice President Al Gore released his Oscar-winning documentary. In those years, the planet has received mixed news; i.e., the Paris Agreement and the ascendancy of climate change deniers in U.S. government. Gore will ask important questions about sustainability, and present the latest data (solar and wind jobs are currently increasing at 12 times the rate of the rest of the American economy, if that offers any hope).” (ThoughtGallery.org)

And don’t forget these continuing events:

The Orchid Show
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY (Feb.14-26)
at the Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave., at 19th St./ 7:30PM, $56-$76
imgres“With classic works by Martha Graham and pieces by four contemporary choreographers — Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Annie-B Parson, Pontus Lidberg and Nacho Duato — the Graham company hosts a two-week season with the theme “Sacred/Profane.” The runs includes premieres by Mr. Cherkaoui, who takes on Sufi mysticism, and Ms. Parson, who is inspired by Graham’s “Punch and the Judy,” a comic work from 1941. Promisingly, there is text by the witty Will Eno.

But the real attraction comes in the Graham masterworks, especially “Primitive Mysteries” (1931), an all-female dance divided into three sections that explores the virgin myths of the American Southwest. There are also sections from the haunting “Dark Meadow” (1946) and Act II from “Clytemnestra” (1958), as well as some lighter fare, including the always lovely “Diversion of Angels” (1948) and the comic work “Maple Leaf Rag” (1990).” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

=====================================================
Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village (all six are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

==================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

================================================================================

A PremierPub / West Village

Corner Bistro / 331 W. 4th St.

Sometimes you just need a beer and a burger. If so, Corner Bistro is the place you want. Located just outside the hip Meatpacking district, this corner bar and grill is decidedly unhip, but it’s not uncrowded, especially at night. Seems that everyone knows this place has one of the better burgers in town.

kac_120405_phude_corner_bistro_bar_1000-600x450In the maze of streets known as the West Village, where West 4th intersects with West 12th (and West 11th, and West 10th, go figure), you will eventually find Corner Bistro on the corner of West 4th and Jane Street. An unassuming neighborhood tavern, it looks just like dozens of other taverns around town.

The bartender tells me that the Corner Bistro celebrated it’s 50th anniversary last year. The well worn interior tells me that the place itself is much older.

Corner Bistro has outlasted many of those other taverns around town because they know how to keep it simple — just good burgers and beer, fairly priced. The classic bistro Burger is only $6.75, and should be ordered medium rare, which will be plenty rare for most folks. Actually, it will be a juicy, messy delight – make sure you have extra napkins. I like to pull up a stool and sit by the large front window in the afternoon, where I can rest my burger and beer on the shelf, and watch the Villagers walk by.

Corner Bistro seems to attract very different groups of patrons depending on time of day. While it’s crowded with locals in the evening, in the afternoon you hear different foreign languages, and watch groups of euro tourists wander in, led by their guidebooks and smartphones.

For the classic Bistro experience, order your burger with a McSorley’s draft, the dark preferably. This is the same beer that you can get over at the original McSorley’s in the East Village, the pub that claims to be the oldest continually operating bar in NYCity. The only difference is that this McSorley’s ale is served with a smile by the bartenders here. Or you can get a Sierra Nevada, Stella, or Hoegaarden on tap if you want to go upscale a bit. Either way this is a simple, but quality burger and beer experience that is just too rare these days (sorry for the pun).
=========================================================
Website: cornerbistrony.com
Phone #: 212-242-9502
Hours: 11:30am-4am Mon-Sat; 12pm-4am Sun
Happy Hour: NO
Music: Juke Box
Subway: #1/2/3 to 14th St. (S end of platform)
Walk 2 blk W. on 13th St. to 8th Ave.; 1 blk S. on 8th Ave. to Jane St.
Update:
==============================================================
“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge (except for certain jazz clubs).

If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
===========================================================================
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Selected NYC Events (02/21) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s Sweet 6 NYC Events>TUESDAY/FEB.21, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

NEW YORK CITY BALLET (through Feb. 26)
at NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, $30+
“The company enters the homestretch of its winter season with a selection of works by Jerome Robbins, one of its founding choreographers. That program (Tuesday and Thursday) includes the bracing “Glass Pieces,” driven by the repetitive structures of its Philip Glass score; “Moves,” a ballet in silence; and “The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody),” a comedy set at a piano recital. Wednesday brings a trio of Broadway-inspired ballets danced to the music of Richard Rodgers, including Balanchine’s “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue.” (NYT-SIOBHAN BURKE)

5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

Picnic Cantata / Dinner at Eight
RAVI COLTRANE
The First 100 Days: Economic Policy
Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness
We Can’t Rewind, We’ve Gone Too Far

Plus Continuing Events:
The Orchid Show
MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY

==============================================================

Music, Dance, Performing Art

Picnic Cantata / Dinner at Eight
NY Festival of Song
at Merkin Concert Hall / 8PM, $40-$55
“A buffet of songs with food as a theme includes the premiere of Gabriel Kahane’s “Six Packets of Oatmeal,” a preview of William Bolcom’s “Dinner at Eight” (which has its full premiere at the Minnesota Opera in March), and a rare performance of Paul Bowles’s 1954 “Picnic Cantata.” Steven Blier and Michael Barrett are at the piano, guiding a quintet of singers.” (NYT-DAVID ALLEN)
* To purchase $20 Real Deal tickets: call the Merkin Box Office at 212.501.3330. Phone orders only.

RAVI COLTRANE (Feb. 21-26)
Jazz Standard, / 7:30PM, + 9:30PM, $
(Feb. 25, additional performance at 11:30 p.m.).
“Mr. Coltrane has a warbling sound that’s as thick as ink on the tenor and soprano saxophones. He’s a passionate, whole-body player, but his impulse is to obscure: His stippled, scattering tunes don’t give you a lot of melodies or rhythms to latch on to. Instead they immerse you in his disposition: poised, meditative, bold. Mr. Coltrane appears here with Adam Rogers on guitar, Dezron Douglas on bass and E. J. Strickland on drums.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

The First 100 Days: Economic Policy
Moderated by Kathleen Hays with Paul Krugman
Graduate Center, CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave./ 6:30pm, FREE, reservation required
“The stock market surged soon after since President Trump’s election, but much remains uncertain about his economic plan. Will his proposed combination of tax cuts, spending cuts, and infrastructure investment produce long-term growth or a new recession? Kathleen Hays, host of Taking Stock on Bloomberg Radio, moderates a panel of experts from across the political spectrum to break down the unknowns and the realities of “Trumponomics.”

Author @ the Library:
Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness
with Peter Godfrey-Smith, Professor of Philosophy at CUNY Graduate Center.
Mid-Manhattan Library / 6:30PM, FREE
“This illustrated lecture combines science and philosophy with first-hand accounts of the remarkable intelligence of the octopus and explores how primitive organisms bobbing in the ocean began sending signals to each other and how these early forms of communication gave rise to the advanced nervous systems that permit cephalopods to change colors and human beings to speak.The authorshares from his underwater adventures and sheds new light on the octopus brain, the human brain, and the evolution of consciousness.”

Elsewhere, but this looks fascinating and worth the detour:

We Can’t Rewind, We’ve Gone Too Far
Kevin Smokler, Virginia Heffernan and Clive Thompson on Technology, Nostalgia and Culture
WORD, 126 Franklin St./ 7PM, FREE
“Join us for a panel on technology, nostalgia and culture with three leading writers in the field!”

And don’t forget this continuing event:

The Orchid Show
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

===========================================================
Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite non jazz music venues, almost all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Town Hall – 123 W43rd St., thetownhall.org, 212-997-6661
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

==================================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

================================================================================

WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Morgan Library & Museum
‘I’M NOBODY! WHO ARE YOU? THE LIFE AND POETRY OF EMILY DICKINSON’ (through May 28).
“This is the second-largest gathering ever, anywhere, of prime Dickinson relics, and as such it comes with an aura the size of a city block. It instantly turns the Morgan into a pilgrimage site, a literary Lourdes, a place to come in contact with one aspect of America that truly can claim greatness. And the show has a mission, to give 21st-century audiences a fresh take on Dickinson. Gone is the white-gowned Puritan nun, and the Belle of Amherst, that infantilized charmer. At the Morgan we get a different Dickinson, a person among people: a member of a household, a village dweller, a citizen.” 212-685-0008, themorgan.org. (NYT-Holland Cotter)

and you should be sure to check out the special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish)

at the very least you will want to see this one:
‘CELEBRATING THE ARTS OF JAPAN: THE MARY GRIGGS BURKE COLLECTION’ (through May 2017)
“This lavish collection of 160 objects came to the Met from the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation in early 2015. The Burkes loved Japanese art — all of it — and the exhibition is close to compendious in terms of media, from wood-carved Buddhas to bamboo baskets, with a particular strength in painting, early and late. The quality of the work? Japan thinks highly enough of it to have made the Burke holdings the first Japanese collection from abroad ever to show at Tokyo National Museum. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

===========================================================
Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW)

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (SUN 11am-1pm PWYW) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 02/13 and 02/11.
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Selected NYC Events (02/20) + Today’s Featured Pub (Greenwich Village)

Today’s Sweet 6 NYC Events>MONDAY/FEB.20, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

ORCHESTRA NATIONAL DE LYON
at Carnegie Hall / 8PM, $12.50-$95
imagegen “Leonard Slatkin brings his French orchestra to town with a program heavy on, well, French composers. Ravel dominates, with the Suite No. 2 from “Daphnis et Chloé,” and Renée Fleming singing “Shéhérazade.” There’s also a Ravel arrangement of Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Antar,” with Thomas Hampson as narrator, and the American debut of Guillaume Connesson’s “Celephaïs.” (NYT – DAVID ALLEN)

Any performance with Renée Fleming will always be my top event of the day – she’s just wonderful.

5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

Juilliard Jazz Ensembles: Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five and Hot Seven
THE MUSIC OF MARVIN GAYE & BILL WITHERS, 
   FEAT. PAPA J. & MO’ SOUL
“The Lady and President Tramp: I Can’t Believe I’m The President”
An All-Female Cast Presents 1776
Theater Talks: August Wilson Effect

Plus Continuing Events:
The Orchid Show

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Music, Dance, Performing Art

Juilliard Jazz Ensembles: Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five and Hot Seven
Dizzy’s Club, Jazz at Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $25
“The Juilliard School has been a destination for world-class music education since it was founded, and these incredible young musicians will exemplify that legacy for this special performance. The Juilliard School Jazz Ensemble features some of the world’s most talented emerging jazz artists, many of whom are already professional musicians. No stranger to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, the ensemble has also performed at noted venues such as the Blue Note and Alice Tully Hall. These gifted young musicians are proof of jazz’s bright future.”

THE MUSIC OF MARVIN GAYE & BILL WITHERS,
FEAT. PAPA J. & MO’ SOUL
B.B. KING BLUES CLUB & GRILL / 8PM, $25
“A true musical icon, the late Marvin Gaye, known as the Prince of Motown, possessed a musical genius that enabled him to easily transition from creating upbeat pop to more socially conscious music, from upbeat funk to “satin-sheet soul.” His long string of hits includes “I Heard it Through the Grapevine,” “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You),” “What’s Going On,” “Let’s Get it On,” “Got to Give It Up” and “Sexual Healing.” Meanwhile, musical luminary Bill Withers is known for irresistible chart-toppers like “Lean on Me,” “Ain’t No Sunshine,” “Just the Two of Us” and more. He has three Grammys and is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Join Harlem-based Papa J. and Mo’ Soul as they pay homage to these two legends. Incorporating soul, funk and blues into their unique sound, the pair’s tribute to Marvin Gaye and Bill Withers is sure to work your groove.”

“The Lady and President Tramp: I Can’t Believe I’m The President,”
starring Donald J. Tramp and comedienne April Brucker,
Don’t Tell Mama, 343 W46th St./ 7PM, $10
The self-proclaimed President of the Uninformed States of America is coming to the Broadway Theater District on President’s Day. Donald J. Tramp is a ventriloquist’s dummy that bears a striking resemblance to the 45th U.S. President, complete with an orange quiff, squinty eyes and outrageous mouth.

The ventriloquist is April Brucker, a petite, Monroe-esque actress, comedienne and media personality who launched a YouTube video series for Mr. Tramp’s presidential campaign on April Fools’ Day 2016.

“From Jeff Dunham and Walter all the way back to Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy, ventriloquists’ dummies have always gotten away with outrageous remarks,” says Ms. Brucker. “Now there’s going to be a President who makes professional dummies look like amateurs.”

“What? There’s another dummy that claims to be President,” says Mr. Tramp. “I’m the legitimate graduate of the Electoral College for Dummies.”

An All-Female Cast Presents 1776
Feinstein’s/54 Below, 254 W54th St./ 7PM, +9:30PM, $ may have to wait list
“This President’s Day, come crack the glass ceiling with Feinstein’s/54 Below as we present an all-female cast singing Sherman Edward’s seminal piece, 1776. Enjoy this contemporary take on one of Broadway’s beloved classics, performed by some of New York’s finest leading ladies. America’s birth has never felt so fresh, or so feminine. The concert will serve as a benefit for DC based non-profit Running Start, which grew out of the Women Under Forty Political Action Committee (WUFPAC), and financially supports young women running for office.”

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Theater Talks: August Wilson Effect
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Blvd./ 6:30PM, FREE
“Amidst a moment of vibrant reimaginings of August Wilson’s work, both on stage and screen, this conversation will contemplate the meaning of his work and legacy, explore the practice of contemporary practitioners of stage and screen craft, and imagine the future of the trajectory of black storytelling. Producer Kamilah Forbes, playwright Chisa Hutchinson, and writer, actor, and recording artist Carl Hancock Rux participate in a conversation moderated by Professor and Director of the August Wilson Society, Dr. Sandra G. Shannon.”

And don’t forget this continuing event:

The Orchid Show
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

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Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite non jazz music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Town Hall – 123 W43rd St., thetownhall.org, 212-997-6661
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening discovery and enjoyment.
See Below.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):
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A PremierPub and 3 Good Eating Places – Greenwich Village

Caffe Vivaldi / 32 Jones Street (btw. Bleecker St./W4th St.)

Café Vivaldi is a classic, intimate club located in Greenwich Village on Jones Street, the street featured on the cover of Bob Dylan’s second album, “Freewheelin’. ”

maxresdefaultEach night Ishrat, the long time proprietor and impresario, carefully curates and schedules an eclectic series of musicians. You can often see him at his table in the corner, hard at work reviewing music videos and listening to cd demos on his laptop, scouting out future bookings. Musicians come from all over to play and sing in a club in Greenwich Village. Some are local New Yorkers, others are just passing through, in town for a few days.

There is a small bar, seating maybe 10. It’s close to the stage and I find it’s a perfect spot to sip a glass of red wine while listening to the music. The room itself has the performance area at one end and a cozy fireplace at the other. The performance area here is small, dominated by a large black Yamaha Grand piano. Tables are bunched together and most people at the tables are eating lite meals or sampling the wonderful desserts.

There is also a good selection of fairly priced wines,  but you are here because of the music. You can never be quite sure what you’re going to find, and that’s half the charm of this place. It’s not a home run every night, but many nights it’s pretty special.

I remember the night I saw the most talented bossa nova group, just in from San Paulo. As I listened, I wondered if there was any better music playing anywhere else in New York City that night. And at Caffé Vivaldi there is never a cover charge. Their recently redesigned web site does give you a better idea of the type of music playing each night.

At one time Greenwich Village was filled with clubs just like this, but times change. Real estate interests have impacted the village, and not for the better. Even Caffé Vivaldi had a rough time recently, when a new landlord raised the rent exorbitantly. Fortunately, Ishrat has built a loyal following over the years, and a fund raiser and slightly more reasonable rent has kept Café Vivaldi in business.

When Woody Allen and Al Pacino wanted to make movies featuring the timeless quality of Greenwich Village they came to Vivaldi. It’s important that we keep this special place alive, for if we lose Cafe Vivaldi, NYCity will have lost a piece of it’s soul.

Website: http://caffevivaldi.com/
Phone #: (212) 691-7538
Hours: Music generally 7:30PM – 11PM, but varies
Lunch/Dinner 11AM-on
Subway: #1 to Christopher St.
Walk 1 blk S. on 7th ave S. to Bleecker St., 1 blk left on Bleecker to Jones St., 50 yards left on Jones St. to Caffe V.
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“Pub” is used in it’s broadest sense – bars, bar/restaurants, jazz clubs, wine bars, tapas bars, craft beer bars, dive bars, cocktail lounges, and of course, pubs – just about anyplace you can get a drink without a cover charge.

If you have a fave premier pub or good eating place on Manhattan’s WestSide let us all know about it – leave a comment.
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3 Good Eating places

It’s not difficult to find a place to eat in Manhattan.
Finding a good, inexpensive place to eat is a bit harder.
Here are a few of my faves in this neighborhood:

Fish280 Bleecker St. (just a bit S. of 7th ave South)
This was an easy pick – the best raw bar special in town. $9 gets you 6 of the freshest oysters or clams + a glass of wine or beer. Don’t know how they can do it, but I tell everyone I know about this place. And it’s located right in the heart of some of the best no cover music in town.

Bleecker Street Pizza – 69 7th ave S. (corner of Bleecker St.)
The place is tiny and not much to look at, but this is one good slice. They like to brag that they have been voted “Best pizza in NY” 3 years in a row by the Food Network. I believe them. I would have voted for them.

Num Pang – 21 E 12th St. (btw. University Place/5th ave.)
This is a Cambodian banh mi sandwich shop that kept me well fed while I was in class nearby recently. It’s cramped, even for NYCity, but usually there is room up the spiral staircase to sit down and eat. In good weather carry your sandwich a few blocks to Union Square park. You may have to wait a few minutes, because everything is freshly made, but it’s worth it. Can you believe – an unheard of 26 food rating by Zagat.

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“3 Good Eating places” focuses on a quick bite, what I call “Fine Fast Food – NYCity Style”
No reservations needed.
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NYCity is the most diverse and interesting place to find a meal anywhere in the world. With more than 24,000 eating establishments you might welcome some advice.

◊ For all my picks of 54 Good Eating places, and essays on my favorite 18 PremierPubs in 9 Neighborhoods on Manhattan’s WestSide, order a copy of my e-book:
“Eating and Drinking on NYCity’s WestSide” ($4.99, available Summer 2017).
◊ Order before May.31, 2017 and receive a bonus – 27 of my favorite casual dining places with free Wi-Fi.

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Selected NYC Events (02/19) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events>SUNDAY/FEB.19, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Feb.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Arturo O’Farrill Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra
Birdland, 315 W44th St./ 9PM +11PM, $30
imgres “Grammy Award winning pianist, composer and educator Arturo O’Farrill — leader of the “first family of Afro-Cuban Jazz” (NY Times) — was born in Mexico and grew up in New York City. He played piano in Carla Bley’s Big Band from 1979 through 1983 and earned a reputation as a soloist in groups led by Dizzy Gillespie, Steve Turre, Freddy Cole, Lester Bowie, Wynton Marsalis and Harry Belafonte.

The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra is the resident large format ensemble of the nonprofit Afro Latin Jazz Alliance (ALJA) founded by Arturo O’Farrill in 2007 and dedicated to preserving the music and heritage of big band Latin jazz.”

6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

Kelly Burke: Love for Sale
Sondheim Unplugged
EXPANSIONS: THE DAVE LIEBMAN GROUP
Miguel Zenón
Balé Folclórico da Bahia
Elaine Race Massacre: A Dramatic Presentation in Music, Motion, and Verse
Continuing Events:
MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY
The Orchid Show

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Music, Dance, Performing Art

Kelly Burke: Love for Sale
Huron Club, 17 Vandam St./ 5PM, $40
image-1 “English singer-actor Burke makes her U.S. debut in a “cabaret-play” set in the 1930s, featuring songs by Kurt Weill and others. The winning Charlie Alterman costars as her pianist.” (TONY)

“Developed for London’s historic Wilton’s Music Hall, and following sell-out performances in London and Edinburgh, Love for Sale is a 1930’s cabaret celebrating the music of Kurt Weill, Cole Porter and their contemporaries. Featuring OffWestEnd Award nominee Kelly Burke and Broadway musical director Charlie Alterman (Pippin, Next to Normal).
“A heartfelt, stylish show – as intelligent as it is decadent” The List

Sondheim Unplugged
Feinstein’s/54 Below, 254 W 54th St./ 7PM, $35 – $70
“Back for Season7! A celebrated New York event since 2010, the BroadwayWorld and Bistro Award-winning series Sondheim Unplugged features some of Broadway and cabaret’s most dynamic voices, accompanied by piano only, delving into the musical world of Broadway’s master composer. Expect tunes from A Little Night Music, Company, Into the Woods, Follies, Passion, Dick Tracy and more.” (BroadwayWorld)

EXPANSIONS: THE DAVE LIEBMAN GROUP
at Smoke Jazz Club, 7, 9 and 10:30PM, $38
“An esteemed soprano saxophonist and N.E.A. Jazz Master, Mr. Liebman, 70, has recently been working with Expansions, a spry, protean quintet. It features three younger musicians — the entrancing pianist Bobby Avey, the multi-reedist Matt Vashlishan and the drummer Alex Ritz — and one longtime associate, the bassist Tony Marino. Last year the band released a live album, “Expansions Live,” full of murky and magnetic interplay. For this three-night run the group will focus on the repertoire of John Coltrane.” (NYT – GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Miguel Zenón Quartet
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St./ 8:30Pm, +10:30PM, $30
“Típico,” Zenón’s new album, is a dedicatory project that celebrates the unity and invention of the alto saxophonist’s longtime quartet, now approaching its second decade as a fierce modernist ensemble. The leader’s lapel-grabbing playing may remain the focus, but his bandmates—the pianist Luis Perdomo, the bassist Hans Glawischnig, and the drummer Henry Cole—having thoroughly absorbed Zenón’s integration of Latin musical sources and jazz, are invaluable contributors, each worthy of his obvious pride.” (NewYorker)

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:

Balé Folclórico da Bahia
Concert Hall at Lehman College, 250 Bedford Park Blvd W / 4PM, $25-$40
2017-02-19-bahia-slideshow-3 “Balé Folclórico da Bahia, the only professional folk dance company in Brazil, was formed in 1988 by Walson Botelho and Ninho Reis. Based in Salvador in the northern state of Bahia, and under the leadership of artistic director José Carlos Arandiba, the 32-member troupe of dancers, musicians, and singers performs a repertory that originates from Bahian folkloric dances of African origin and includes slave dances, capoeira, samba, and those that celebrate Carnival. The company highlights the region’s culture within a contemporary theatrical vision. Balé Folclórico da Bahia made its European debut in 1992 when it participated in Berlin’s Alexander Platz International Festival and drew an audience of 50,000. Its US debut tour was in 1995—96 and it has since performed in 88 US cities, earning rave reviews and playing to sold-out houses.”

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Elaine Race Massacre: A Dramatic Presentation in Music, Motion, and Verse
Trinity Church, 74 Trinity Pl./ 2PM, FREE
“No one knows who fired the first shot in Elaine, Arkansas in 1919, triggering one of the deadliest race riots in United States history. That stark moment was a turning point for American civil liberties, propelling changes to our criminal justice system and paving the way for the Civil Rights movement.

Actors will read selections from J. Chester Johnson’s beautiful poetic rendering about one of the worst genocides in American history, with accompanying dance by Trinity’s Movement Choir and a multimedia presentation.”

And don’t forget these continuing events:

MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY (Feb.14-26)
at the Joyce Theater175 Eighth Ave., at 19th St./ 2PM, +7:30PM, $56-$76
imgres“With classic works by Martha Graham and pieces by four contemporary choreographers — Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Annie-B Parson, Pontus Lidberg and Nacho Duato — the Graham company hosts a two-week season with the theme “Sacred/Profane.” The runs includes premieres by Mr. Cherkaoui, who takes on Sufi mysticism, and Ms. Parson, who is inspired by Graham’s “Punch and the Judy,” a comic work from 1941. Promisingly, there is text by the witty Will Eno.

But the real attraction comes in the Graham masterworks, especially “Primitive Mysteries” (1931), an all-female dance divided into three sections that explores the virgin myths of the American Southwest. There are also sections from the haunting “Dark Meadow” (1946) and Act II from “Clytemnestra” (1958), as well as some lighter fare, including the always lovely “Diversion of Angels” (1948) and the comic work “Maple Leaf Rag” (1990).” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

The Orchid Show
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

=======================================================
Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite non jazz music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Town Hall – 123 W43rd St., thetownhall.org, 212-997-6661
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

=======================================================================
♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
‘FROM THE COLLECTION: 1960-1969’ (through March 12)
“MoMA shakes up its sanctum sanctorum, installing half of its permanent collection galleries with works chosen by 17 curators from a single decade: the tumultuous 1960s. The limited time frame is balanced by unprecedented breadth and variety. As never before, the presentation mixes together objects and artworks from all six of the museum’s curatorial departments. The blend is alternately stimulating and bewildering, revelatory and infuriating: yet another symptom of the museum’s limited curatorial mind-set. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Smith)

‘FRANCIS PICABIA: OUR HEADS ARE ROUND SO OUR THOUGHTS CAN CHANGE DIRECTION’ (through March 19).
“The restless career of one of the great provocateurs of early modernism finally gets its due from the Museum of Modern Art, healthfully perturbing that institution’s emphasis on linear progress and creative genius with radically shifting styles and tones. His lush, large-scale Cubist paintings; machine-based images; Dada anti-art and magazines; several returns to figuration; and final abstract styles are all present and give no quarter.” (Smith)

 ‘TONY OURSLER: IMPONDERABLE’ (through April 16)
“This small exhibition is centered on a 90-minute film in which episodes from the history of spiritualist frauds and hoaxes are re-enacted by people in fanciful costumes while mystic flames, smoke and ectoplasmic phenomena come and go. At certain moments during “Imponderable,” you feel breezes wafting over you and hear loud thumping under the theater’s risers. The crudeness of these effects is part of the generally comical spirit. It’s all about the confusion between illusion and reality to which human beings seem to be congenitally susceptible.” (Johnson)

And a special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

FAST FORWARD: PAINTING FROM THE 1980S (thru May 14)

“Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s presents a focused look at painting from this decade with works drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection.

In the 1980s, painting recaptured the imagination of the contemporary art world against a backdrop of expansive change. An unprecedented number of galleries appeared on the scene, particularly in downtown New York. Groundbreaking exhibitions—that blurred distinctions between high and low art—were presented at alternative and artist-run spaces. New mediums, including video and installation art, were on the rise. Yet despite the growing popularity of photography and video, many artists actively embraced painting, freely exploring its bold physicality and unique capacity for expression and innovation.

The exhibition includes work by artists often identified with this explosive period—Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and Julian Schnabel—as well as by several lesser-known painters. These artists explored the traditions of figuration and history painting, and offered new interpretations of abstraction. Many addressed fundamental questions about artmaking in their work, while others took on political issues including AIDS, feminism, gentrification, and war. In the face of a media-saturated environment, artists in the 1980s recommitted to painting. Far from dead, painting came to represent an important intersection between new ways of seeing and a seemingly traditional way of making art.”

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right sidebar dated 02/17 and 02/15.
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