Selected Events + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide (10/31)

Today’s “TOP 3″/ Selected NYCity Events – FRIDAY, OCT. 31, 2014
“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to. We make it as easy as 1-2-3.”

It’s Halloween, Charley Brown. Here are two events that look interesting:

Halloween at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine
“At 7 and 10 p.m., screenings of the 1925 silent classic “Phantom of the Opera” — accompanied by live organ music — will be followed by a parade of spectral puppets in the “Procession of the Ghouls” by the Mettawee River Theater Company. Tickets are $25, and online reservations are suggested.
Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, at 112th St.
212-316-7540 / stjohndivine.org.
OR
Village Halloween Parade
Whoopi Goldberg will be in the lead float as grand marshal of this year’s spectacle of puppets, costumed revelers and performers. With a focus on nature, the parade has adopted the theme of Garden of Earthly Delights. This is the 41st year for the procession along Avenue of the Americas, which begins at 7 p.m. at Vandam Street and ends at 16th Street.
Anyone in costume can join in the march, but must enter at Canal Street.
New York 1 will broadcast the parade, starting at 8.
More details: halloween-nyc.com” (NYT)

Ron Carter Nonet (through Nov. 1)
“The bassist Ron Carter, now in his mid-70s and a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, has come to project a professorial erudition along with his steady virtuosity. His ensemble here advances the cause, with four cellos and rhythm section.” (NYT-Chinen)
Birdland, 315 West 44th St., (btw 8/9 ave)
212-581-3080 / birdlandjazz.com
8:30 & 11 pm /$40 cover, with a $10 minimum.

Archtober / October 1–31 (LAST DAY)
“To New York City’s architects and building buffs, October is Archtober, or Architecture and Design Month. For 31 days, the City’s design community opens its doors for more than 150 tours, lectures, films and celebrations, offering a behind-the-scenes look at the buildings that give this metropolis its distinct character.” (nycgo.com)

This is the last day of what has been a fabulous month of events – hats off to the organizers as we look forward to next Archtober.

Highlight’s from Today’s Events:
Building of the Day: Starlight at the City Museum / 12:00
Starlight is a dazzling focal point and new attraction for the City Museum’s main entry space—a brilliant new light installation suspended above the Rotunda. Conceived by Cooper Joseph Studio as a perfect circle in elevation, it accentuates the Rotunda’s sweeping circular staircase. The 5,283 points of light boldly complement the City Museum’s 1932 neo-Georgian home, […]

-The Municipal Art Society of New York
Walking Tour: Halloween Tour of Uptown Trinity Church Cemetery / 3:00pm
At Halloween, historic Trinity Church Cemetery is Manhattan’s ideal gothic autumn getaway. Join Trinity Church Cemetery expert Eric K. Washington for this special late-afternoon tour

editor’s note: a 2nd hard drive failure in 7 months (what’s going on here Apple!) requires a reduction in daily event info on this site until the hardware issues have been resolved. while we use borrowed equipment and until further notice, the daily “Fab 5” is now the “Top 3”. we look forward to restoring full service soon.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity is a big town with many visitors, where quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times wonderful Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

American Folk Art Museum:
Fasanella-Bridges‘Ralph Fasanella: Lest We Forget’ (through Nov. 30) The centenary of the birth of this formidable self-taught urban visionary, activist and New Yorker is celebrated with a riveting selection of his largest, most epic paintings. Their teeming compositions crowd searing events from 20th-century American life into complex amalgams of time, space and color and conduct a fertile exchange with the museum’s Willem van Genk show. 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue at 66th Street, 212-595-9533, folkartmuseum.org. (Roberta Smith)

van_genk‘Willem van Genk: Mind Traffic’ (through Nov. 30) Brilliantly paired with the Ralph Fasanella exhibition, the American solo debut of this outstanding Dutch artist, who died in 2005 at 78, adds a bright star to the outsider firmament. A draftsman of extraordinary talent, a hoarder and mystic obsessed with maps, travel and transportation, van Genk obsessively recycled found imagery and materials and his own drawings into collages and fanatically textured paintings that convey the sights, sounds and very static of modern life. 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue at 66th Street, 212-595-9533, folkartmuseum.org. (Smith)

Museum of Modern Art: 
‘Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness’ (through Nov. 2) This meticulously considered and assembled survey of one of the deepest thinkers of the Pictures Generation is as beautiful as it is demanding. No aspect of photography — as art, craft, science or commerce — or of exhibition-making has been left unturned, yielding a show that is a big, brainy work of art unto itself. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

‘A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio’ (through Nov. 2) This mostly lively if repetitive overview traces the history of photography as the Modern never has — with images taken in the studio rather than out in the world. Its roughly 180 works span 160 years and represent some 90 portraitists, commercial photographers, lovers of still life, darkroom experimenters, Conceptual artists and several generations of postmodernists. Including film and video, it offers much to look at but dwells too much in the past, becoming increasingly blinkered and cautious as it approaches the present. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Smith)

107508‘The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’ (through March 22) In his printed works, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec chronicled and publicized the music halls, theaters, circuses, operas and cafes of Paris with terrific verve, sly wit and surprising subtlety. This enthralling show presents approximately 100 examples drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 212-708-9400, moma.org. (Johnson)

New-York Historical Society:
‘A Brief History of New York: Selections From ‘A History of New York in 101 Objects’ (through Nov. 30) Every object tells a story. If New York City is or ever was your home, you’ll find 30 eloquent items in this absorbing, jewel box of an exhibition based on “A History of New York in 101 Objects,” a new book by Sam Roberts, an urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times. Illuminated behind glass walls is an intriguingly eclectic collection, including an arrowhead, a short section of the first transatlantic cable, the pink rubber ball called the Spaldeen and a jar containing dust gathered from near the World Trade Center shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org. (Johnson)

Skyscraper Museum:
TS84_IntroWall‘Times Square, 1984: The Postmodern Moment’ (through Jan. 18) In this smart, pithy show, 20 architectural panels capture the essence of another show, the “Times Tower Site Competition” held by New York’s Municipal Art Society 30 years ago, when over 500 architects made proposals for the famous triangular site in Times Square. Philip Johnson and John Burgee were proposing a suave 4.2 million-square-foot ensemble of four skyscrapers that would help “clean up” the surrounding urban squalor, and they favored an open square at the center of their project. The Municipal Art Society protested the proposal by asking for alternatives to replace the Times Tower. The dispute proved a turning point in New York’s urban history and, more broadly, in American architectural history, as the postmodernism of the Johnson towers gave way to a highly eclectic, free-for-all postmodernism devoid of his mansards or triumphal arches. 39 Battery Place, Lower Manhattan, 212-968-1961, skyscraper.org. (Joseph Giovannini)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see “Recent Posts” in the right Sidebar dated (10/29) and (10/27).
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