Selected Events (07/08) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s Sweet 6 > FRIDAY / JULY 08, 2016

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
(click on links for more complete event info.)

Have time for only one event today? Do this:

Bob Dylan
Forest Hills Stadium, 1 Tennis Place, at Burns Street, Queens / 7PM, $50-$365
may have to VIP or stub hub this one.
“Less than a month after going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, Bob Dylan played over boos during an unruly gig at Forest Hills Stadium. This concert should be more staid, but it will have surprises of its own. Mr. Dylan’s set lists have lately drawn most heavily from his recent LPs of Sinatra-inspired covers, some of his most charming — and enigmatic — music in years. With Mavis Staples.” (Murray-NYT)

OK, this is not Manhattan’s WestSide, but it is Dylan and Mavis Staples. Better get there early for Mavis and how many more chances will you have to see that American icon, Mr. Bob Dylan. I’ll be there.

Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Anat Fort Trio With Gianluigi Trovesi
Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W17th St./ 7PM, $20
“On “Birdwatching,” her ruminative and often sparkling new album on the ECM label, the Israeli pianist Anat Fort supplements her working trio with an inspired outsider, the excellent Italian multireedist Gianluigi Trovesi. They repeat the collaboration here, as part of a brief North American tour.” (Chinen-NYT)

Joe Lovano Quartet (thru July10)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th St./ 8:30PM, +10:30PM, $30
“Mr. Lovano, a saxophonist equally drawn to garrulous epiphany and tender lyricism, convenes a new band for this six-night run at the Village Vanguard, his second home. Along with the pianist Kenny Werner, a longtime compatriot, it features the virtuoso bassist John Patitucci and the wise and grounded drummer Andrew Cyrille.” (Chinen-NYT)

Elsewhere, but the Bowery Ballroom is a very fine music hall:
Jessy Lanza
Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey St./ 9PM, $15
“Growing up in Hamilton, Ontario, this pop vocalist tinkered around with her father’s synthesizers and stringently studied jazz: the tracks she’s writing and producing today glimmer with the sheen of maximalist eighties mall pop shrunken down to the tinny sounds of MIDI keyboards, and the rhythms betray an innate relationship with swing.

Her sophomore record, “Oh No,” released this May, is most satisfying for its lack of buildup: songs like “Never Enough” and “It Means I Love You” putter along in modestly dreamy loops, giving Lanza room to jitter in high registers that she nails with ease. It’s the kind of kawaii-and-blues thump that PC Music perfected last year—always a rush to hear live.” (NewYorker)

Smart Stuff / Other
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other

In High Esteem: A Guided Game of Curation
Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle/ 11AM, FREE with museum admission
“Why do people collect objects? What do collections say about individuals? Society? History? Examine these questions on an interactive “collecting journey” in the exhibition Studio Job MAD HOUSE. Inspired by questions asked by the duo behind Studio Job—Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel, visitors will be guided by MAD educators as they explore motivations behind collecting that will uncover symbols, signifiers, and icons that inform viewers experiences and value associations.”

Want to go batty?
Evening Bat Walks in Central Park
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th St./ 8PM, $40
“At dusk, bats leave the warm spaces under city roofs to feed on flying insects. Join Bradley Klein, Danielle Gustafson, and other members of the New York City Bat Group for a walk through Central Park. Aided by detectors that amplify the bats’ otherwise inaudible high-frequency chirps, bat-watchers monitor and catalogue the species that call the city home.”

Meet at the Museum entrance on 77th Street between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue. Enrollment is limited. if you miss this one, register in advance for July 15, July 22, or July 29, 2016.

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Bonus – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 58 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 Solomon R Guggenheim Museum:
“Moholy-Nagy: Future Present,”  (through Sept. 7)
“A key innovator in the fields of kinetic sculpture and cameraless photography, Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) was one of the giants of 20th-century modernism, who pioneered the use of ephemeral materials like plastics. The Hungarian-born artist was an instructor at the legendary Bauhaus in Germany before he eventually moved to Chicago to continue his teaching. This retrospective is his first in 50 years.” (TONY)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum:
‘Beauty — Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial’ (through Aug. 21)
“This year’s version of the Cooper Hewitt’s always interesting Design Triennial boldly ventures to tackle one of the most controversial topics in today’s visual culture. With more than 250 works by 63 designers from around the world in a jam-packed two-floor show, it’s a mixed bag in terms of quality. But whether or not everything in it qualifies as incontrovertibly beautiful, it offers an exciting opportunity to meditate on two perennially confounding questions: What is beauty? And what is it good for? 2 East 91st Street, 212-849-8400, cooperhewitt.org.” (Ken Johnson-NYT)

Morgan Library & Museum:
‘Dreams in Dust: The Pastels of Lucas Samaras’ (through Aug. 21)
“In the late 1950s, when ambitious painters were obliged to produce big, bold abstractions, Lucas Samaras took up the fragile, intimate medium of pastel. He went on to forge a singular, nearly 60-year career of eccentric invention in painting, sculpture and photography, but he periodically returned to pastel to create small, vibrantly colorful and poetically captivating images. Of the hundreds of pastels Mr. Samaras has made, 48 are in this intensely absorbing exhibition. Dating from 1958-83, they range from offbeat abstractions to hallucinogenic allegories. 225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, 212-685-0008, themorgan.org.” (Johnson-NYT)

‘Rembrandt’s First Masterpiece’ (through Sept. 18)
“In 1629, after some years of apprenticeship, the young Rembrandt finished what many experts consider his first painting in his resolved and distinctive style. Titled “Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver,” it is certainly powerful in ways that his great work will be, with its operatic, Verdian largeness of gesture, its sense for light as both specific and cosmic, and its piercing, unembarrassable instinct for human emotion. Now in a British private collection, the picture is visiting New York for the first time, and has been surrounded at the Morgan Library with a wealth of the artist’s prints and drawings. 225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, 212-685-0008, themorgan.org.” (Cotter-NYT)

Jewish Museum:
‘Roberto Burle Marx: Brazilian Modernist’ (through Sept. 18)
“Working primarily in South America, Roberto Burle Marx, the great Brazilian landscape architect, designed some of the modern world’s most distinctive parks and gardens, from an immense, jazzy tattoo of a promenade on the beachfront of Rio de Janeiro to rooftop plantings in Brasilia, a city carved from jungle. In the process, he became invested, heart and mind, in preserving the Amazonian paradise that surrounded him, fought to halt its devastation and turned his home near Rio into a sanctuary for one of the largest collections of tropical plants anywhere. To appreciate his art fully, you have to go to the gardens themselves, but a visit to the compact Jewish Museum show gives you a full sense of his protean work as designer, painter, sculptor and collector. 1109 Fifth Avenue, at 92nd Street, 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org.” (Cotter-NYT)

and you should check out special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish)

at the very least you want to see this one:
‘Turner’s Whaling Pictures’ at the Met (thru Aug 7)
“Among the most revered works by the great British painter Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775–1851) are those representing the world dissolved by light, steam, fog, smoke, rain, wind and snow. One of his favorite settings for his evocations of elemental chaos was the ocean, where nature regularly overwhelms human challenges to its dominion. In this vein, late in his career, he made the dangerous business of whaling the subject of four stirringly atmospheric and poetically thrilling paintings. They’ve never been shown together until now, in this small, beautiful exhibition that no Turner fan should miss.” (Ken Johnson-NYT)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW)

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (SUN 11am-1pm PWYW) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 07/06 and 07/02.
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This week’s fave and FREE NYCity AppS: 
Trip Advisor
An enormous base of NYCity user reviews (2.1 million) provides the widest coverage of hotels (468), restaurants (12,645) and things to do (yes, 3,246). Have a specific question? Then try one of Trip Advisor’s forums. Just remember that with all those reviews you have to try to find the consistency among the comments, and ignore the outliers.

OpenTable
Instantly locate restaurants near you with open reservations and then place a reservation right from your iOS device. A great interface and the ability to see a menu from the restaurant you’re interested in makes this my go to restaurant reservation app.

Subway Time 
Need to catch your #1,2,3 subway to attend an event? Use the Subway Time app from the MTA to find out when the next train arrives at your station. The MTA also has Bus Time info available on their mobile website.
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