Selected Events (07/12) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Sweet 6 > TUESDAY / JULY 12, 2016

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
(click on links for more complete event info.)

Have time for only one event today? Do this:

Marissa Mulder: Marilyn in Fragments (also July26)
Laurie Beechman Theatre at the West Bank Cafe, 407W42nd St./ 7PM, $20
“As comfortable singing Tom Waits as she is singing Noël Coward, the winsomely natural Mulder is one of the cabaret world’s biggest breakout successes of the past five years. Her new set is devoted to the fractured image of Hollywood icon Marilyn Monroe.” (TONY)

Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Molly Pope in A Star Is Born
Feinstein’s/54 Below, 254 W54th St./ 7PM, $40
Pope’s viscerally thrilling alto is a rich gusher of sound that emerges like a full-on blast from the past. In her latest venture, the downtown darling boldly essays the score from the 1954 Judy Garland version of A Star Is Born, including “The Man That Got Away,” “Swanee” and “You Took Advantage of Me.” The wizardly Brian Nash mans the piano.” (TONY)

Jimmy Heath Quartet (through July 17)
Village Vanguard, 178 7th Ave South, at 11th St./ 8:30PM +10:30PM, $
“Jimmy Heath, who will turn 90 in the fall, is a tireless saxophonist, composer, educator and National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master. He often works at the Village Vanguard with the Heath Brothers, whose pianist, Jeb Patton, and bassist, David Wong, both join him here. On drums is Al Foster, a rhythm magician who recorded with Mr. Heath more than 30 years ago.” (Chinen-NYT)

Twyla Tharp Dance (through July 23)
Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave./ try the $76 loge seats, they are fine.
“Twyla Tharp, modern dance’s great populist, brings her company back to the Joyce for the first time in over a decade. The broad range of her artistic and cultural interests is on display with a program that includes deconstructed square dancing in “Country Dances” (1976); the busy, complicated and colorful “Brahms Paganini” from 1980, with six dancers elegantly freaking out in preppy pastels; and a new work made to Beethoven’s Opus 130.” (Schaefer-NYT)
Mondays through Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m., Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 2 and 8 p.m.

Smart Stuff / Other
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other

Digital Disobedience:
A Virtual Conversation with Edward Snowden and Jaron Lanier
Story, 144 10th Ave @ 19th St./ 5:30PM,
“We live in a world where a few keystrokes can alter the course of a generation. As dramatized in USA’s Mr. Robot, this alarming power comes with staggering responsibility, and presents us with opportunities for both great innovation and terrible exploitation. Join #DisruptSTORY for an unprecedented virtual discussion between NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and celebrated computer scientist and author Jaron Lanier that will explore the challenges and opportunities of the digital revolution.”

Manhattanhenge
“Every summer, NYC’s street grid is treated to a sunset phenomenon called Manhattanhenge, a term coined by Neil deGrasse Tyson (director of the American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium) as a play on Stonehenge. The sunset synchs with Manhattan’s east-west numbered streets, creating beautiful photo opportunities. This month, the full sun will be visible on the grid on July 11 at 8:20pm, and the half sun the next night at 8:20pm. Prime locations to view the phenomenon are wide cross streets like 14th, 34th, 42nd, 57th, and 79th. Catch a discussion on the phenomenon at the planetarium on the 12th at 7pm, followed by a viewing at sunset.” (cityguideny.com)

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Bonus – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 58 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats in advance, even if just on day of performance.
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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

‘Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty’ (through July 24)
“Among the greats of late 19th-century French painting, Degas remained closest to tradition and its focus on the human body, which may explain why this large but thrillingly intimate show is his first solo at the Modern. It focuses his monotypes — the most seductive of all print mediums — and their modernizing effect on his art, revealing with exceptional clarity a radical merging of subject and process that brought new liveliness to depictions of the body and to art itself. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Smith)

‘Dadaglobe Reconstructed’ (through Sept. 18)
“In 1920, the Romanian poet and gadfly Tristan Tzara made plans for a worldwide publication featuring the art of Dada, the convention-busting movement that arose from the senselessness of World War I. The anthology never materialized, but this sparky show, first seen at the Kunsthaus Zürich and accompanied by a landmark catalog, reassembles the drawings, reproductions and wacky head shots that Dadaists like Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp and Sophie Taeuber-Arp contributed for it. (There’s also fascinating correspondence and ephemera, plus photographs of knees-up parties; at one, Tzara appears in black tie with the word Dada scrawled across his forehead.) For the Dadaists, art wasn’t a matter of placing discrete objects in museums, but circulating ideas and images across new, international media networks. It is an aim as fresh today as it was a century ago. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Farago)

‘From the Collection: 1960-1969’ (through March 2017)
“MoMA shakes up its sanctum sanctorum, installing half of its permanent collection galleries with works chosen by 17 curators from a single decade: the tumultuous 1960s. The limited time frame is balanced by unprecedented breadth and variety. As never before, the presentation mixes together objects and artworks from all six of the museum’s curatorial departments. The blend is alternately stimulating and bewildering, revelatory and infuriating: yet another symptom of the museum’s limited curatorial mind-set. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Smith)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

‘Stuart Davis: In Full Swing’ (through Sept. 25)
“This restless, zestful Whitney exhibition leaves out the earliest phase of a great American modernist’s career but is still broad enough to be a survey while feeling sufficiently focused to qualify as a thematic study. As you move through the show, you move through time, and change over time is the thread the show follows. Beginning in the 1950s, you see Mr. Davis’s dense compositions, abstract with a realist core, start to untangle. His palette simplifies. His use of words, or script-like arabesques, grows. And more and more he looks to the past and brings it forward, revisiting, reusing and transforming motives from his own art, a pattern he likened to a jazz musician’s improvisations on favorite, unforgettable tunes. 99 Gansevoort Street, at Washington Street, 212-570-3600, whitney.org.” (Cotter)

‘Human Interest: Portraits From the Whitney’s Collection’ (through Feb. 12)
“A year ago, the Whitney inaugurated its new downtown home with a permanent collection showcase called “America Is Hard to See.” Its even more immediately engaging successor, devoted entirely to portraiture, is now on view and might well have been subtitled “Americans Are Strange to Look At,” which, in the 250 images here, we sure are: funny-strange, beautiful-strange, crazy-strange, dangerous-strange, inscrutable-strange. The work is arranged by theme and spread over two floors. There are magnetic images everywhere. 99 Gansevoort Street, 212-570-3600, whitney.org.” (Cotter)

Museum of Arts and Design:

‘Studio Job: Mad House’ (through Aug. 21)
“Working in the overlap of fine art and design, the Belgium-based Studio Job produces materially opulent tables, chairs, clocks, rugs, wallpaper, stained-glass windows, lamps, decorative objects and sculptures. While exceptionally imaginative and wide-ranging in their historical and sociopolitical references, the works in this lavish, two-floor exhibition are more kitschy than visionary. A gaudy, 12-foot tall sculpture of King Kong climbing to the top of the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, would make a fine gift for a Las Vegas casino owner. 2 Columbus Circle, 212-299-7777, madmuseum.org.” (Johnson)

 New-York Historical Society:

‘The Folk Art Collection of Elie and Viola Nadelman’ (through Aug. 21)
“The Nadelmans’ tale, like the best collecting narratives, is a riveting combination of wealth, visionary thought, aesthetic passion and cruel fate. It is recounted in this outstanding exhibition (and catalog) in unprecedented detail. The 250 objects on view sample the immense collection — most of which was purchased by the Society in 1937 — while the great Nadelman wood sculptures tell of the inspiration Elie drew from it. 170 Central Park West, at 77th Street, 212-873-3400, nyhistory.org.” (Smith)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right sidebar dated 07/10 and 07/08.
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This week’s fave and FREE NYCity AppS: 
Trip Advisor
An enormous base of NYCity user reviews (2.1 million) provides the widest coverage of hotels (468), restaurants (12,645) and things to do (yes, 3,246). Have a specific question? Then try one of Trip Advisor’s forums. Just remember that with all those reviews you have to try to find the consistency among the comments, and ignore the outliers.

OpenTable
Instantly locate restaurants near you with open reservations and then place a reservation right from your iOS device. A great interface and the ability to see a menu from the restaurant you’re interested in makes this my go to restaurant reservation app.

Subway Time 
Need to catch your #1,2,3 subway to attend an event? Use the Subway Time app from the MTA to find out when the next train arrives at your station. The MTA also has Train and Bus Time info available on their mobile website.
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