Selected NYC Events (09/30) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

Today’s Top 10 NYC Events > FRIDAY / SEPT 30, 2016

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Annual NYC Events / Sept.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

NEW YORK CITY BALLET (through Oct. 16)
NYS / DHK Theater, Lincoln Center/ at various times, $
“City Ballet’s season continues with George Balanchine’s shimmering triptych “Jewels” (Friday, Saturday matinee, Sunday) and encores for new works by the company members Justin Peck, Lauren Lovette and Peter Walker, as well as Annabelle Lopez Ochoa. Accompanying them is Mr. Peck’s exhilarating “Everywhere We Go” from 2014 (Saturday evening and Wednesday). Tuesday and Thursday’s program honors American composers, with Jerome Robbins’s “Glass Pieces,” referring to Philip Glass; Peter Martins’s “Thou Swell,” a jazzy fling to Richard Rodgers; and Balanchine’s patriotic “Stars and Stripes,” to the music of John Philip Sousa.” (Schaefer-NYT)

Music, Dance, Performing Arts

JOHN SCOFIELD (through Oct. 2)
Blue Note, 131 W3rd St./ 8PM, +10:30PM, $20-$35
“For his latest project, “Country for Old Men,” the guitarist didn’t exactly run down to Nashville and start cutting duets with the likes of Kenny Chesney. What he did do was transform some favorite country songs into jazz excursions for a crack ensemble featuring longtime collaborators, including the celebrated electric bassist Steve Swallow and the keyboardist Larry Goldings. The result is a clever genre mashup; it’s not every day that you hear Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” transformed into a stirring jazz-waltz jam.” (NewYorker)

FALL FOR DANCE (through Oct. 8)
City Center, 131 W55th St./ 8PM, all seats $15
“The best sampler platter of dance in town — and of the year, for that matter — continues with Program 3 on Friday and Saturday, featuring Compagnie Accrorap, a French troupe mixing street dance and acrobatics; the tapper Ayodele Casel in a solo dedicated to unsung female dancers; Hong Kong Ballet with a work by Jorma Elo; and Bangarra Dance Theater from Australia, telling stories of that country’s indigenous peoples (2:05). On Wednesday and Thursday, in Program 4, Jessica Lang presents a work inspired by architecture; Royal Ballet Flanders offers “Fall,” an ode to the season by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui; Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater presents the seminal solo “Cry”; and the Sarasota Ballet performs Frederick Ashton’s “Marguerite and Armand” (2:15).” (Schaefer-NYT)

Tedeschi Trucks Band (also October 1, 4, 5, 7 & 8)
Beacon Theatre, Broadway & 74th St./ 8PM, $30+
“Tedeschi Trucks Band will continue their Beacon Theatre tradition of multiple-night residencies for the sixth consecutive year with the greatest number of shows to date. The 12-piece band led by husband and wife Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi have performed at the Beacon Theatre since 2011, and this year’s run has expanded to six shows with special guest openers Amy Ray (9/30), Dave Mason (10/4), and Jorma Kaukonen (10/5). Select weekend nights (10/1, 10/7, 10/8) will feature TTB performing two full sets with no openers.

The return to the Beacon adds to the Grammy Award-winning band’s growing legacy of delivering a one-of-a-kind, unforgettable performances in New York City. Last year, during its sold-out 4-night run, the ensemble debuted numerous new songs, changed up their set lists nightly for fans and played host to brilliant surprise collaborations with guests Jon Batiste, Rosanne Cash, Charles Bradley and David Hidalgo.”

HENRY THREADGILL’S ZOOID (through Oct. 2)
Village Vanguard, 178 7th Avenue South, at 11th St./ 8:30PM, +10:30PM, $30
“Mr. Threadgill recently won a well-deserved Pulitzer Prize for music, on the strength of his assuredly spiky 2015 album, “In for a Penny, In for a Pound.” He’ll be at the Village Vanguard this week with the same band featured on the album: Zooid, a blazingly intuitive chamber-improv unit with Liberty Ellman on guitar, Jose Davila on tuba, Christopher Hoffman on cello and Elliot Kavee on drums.” (Chinen-NYT)

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:
Taylor Mac: A 24-Decade History of Popular Music
St. Ann’s Warehouse, 45 water St.DUMBO/ 7:30PM, $56
“A Fabergé radical—beautiful, ridiculous and full of hidden tricks—the sublimely freakish Taylor Mac pilots audiences through fantastical journeys, guided only by the compass of his magnetic individuality. In the culmination of a project that has been in the works for five years, the performer surveys the past 250 years of American music, first in eight three-hour installments and then, on October 8, as a 24-hour marathon.” (TONY)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN FILM FESTIVAL (through Sunday)
Cinépolis Chelsea, 260 W23rd St./ various times, $
“This niche, but informative, festival began on Wednesday and continues through the weekend with a lineup that looks to architecture’s past — “Peter Behrens: A Pioneer in Architecture” (Friday at 9:15 p.m.) and “Eero Saarinen: The Architect Who Saw the Future” (Sunday at 8:30 p.m.) — as well as the present, including a program that explores the homes of contemporary architects, “Where Architects Live” (Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m.).”

The 54th New York Film Festival (thru Oct.16)
Alice Tully Hall, various times
“Founded in 1963, as the auteur theory and European cinematic modernism were crashing upon the shores of American film culture, the New York Film Festival continues to introduce audiences to the most exciting, innovative and accomplished works of world cinema. Join us as North America’s second oldest film festival marks its 54th edition with 17 days of exciting world premieres, award winners from Cannes, Berlin and Venice, retrospective screenings, spotlights on emerging filmmakers, panels, galas and much more!”
09/30/2016 The 54th New York Film Festival
10/01/2016 Gimme Danger
10/13/2016 Pablo Larraín’s Jackie
10/15/2016 New York Film Festival Closing Night – Lost City of Z

Free Friday at the Morgan Library & Museum
Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Ave. (btw 36th/37th st.) / 7PM-9PM
“Check out the new exhibit of works by the French artist Jean Dubuffet, which opens on Friday, or an exhibit of letters and manuscripts from Charlotte Bronte, which opened last week.” dnainfo.com

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Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite music venues, most on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 58 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 Solomon R Guggenheim Museum:
‘BUT A STORM IS BLOWING FROM PARADISE: CONTEMPORARY ART OF THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA’ (through Oct. 5)
“The third and final of the Guggenheim Museum’s UBS Map Global Art Initiative group exhibitions feels a bit more of a piece than the others, though, like them, it gives the impression of being a museum’s attempt to get global fast by skimming from the top of the international market. It’s worth a visit to see some of the individual pieces, among them a two-part 2010 video by Zineb Sedira titled “Gardiennes d’Image” (“Image Keepers”), a filmed interview with Safia Kouaci, widow of Mohamed Kouaci (1929-96), who was, Ms. Sedira believes, the only Algerian photographer to thoroughly document the country’s war of independence from France. 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org.” (Cotter)

MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK:
‘ROZ CHAST: CARTOON MEMOIRS’ (through Oct. 16)
“This delightful, frequently laugh-out-loud exhibition presents more than 200 works by the brilliant, widely beloved visual humorist Roz Chast, including many images made for The New Yorker over the past four decades as well as some never before published. The anxieties, contradictions and pathos of middle class, metropolitan life have rarely been illustrated with such generous comic élan. Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, 212-534-1672, mcny.org.” (Johnson)

MET BREUER:
‘DIANE ARBUS: IN THE BEGINNING’ (through Nov. 27)
“This show of 100 or so early photographs by Arbus (1923-71), many on view for the first time, has a terrific installation, with work hung on columnlike panels that suggest rows of doors receding into darkness. The pictures themselves, dating between 1956 and 1962, have a grainy, moody texture, and they reveal an Arbus who had already landed on some of her favored themes: childhood, negotiable gender, fringe culture and class. If the show as a whole is more powerful than most of its individual images, there are some wonderful things. And as a forecast of mature work to come — familiar examples are included in a separate gallery — it is utterly magnetic. 945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street, Manhattan, 212-535-0177, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM:
‘HANS MEMLING: PORTRAITURE, PIETY AND A REUNITED ALTARPIECE’ (through January 2017)
“When it comes to jewels, there are Taylor-Burton rocks and discreetly cut heirloom stones. With museum shows, it’s the same. This one, at the Morgan Library, is a minute but invaluable gem. Set in a 20-by-20-by-20-foot gallery known as the Cube, it reunites, for the first time in the United States, dispersed sections of an altarpiece by the 15th-century German-born, Flanders-based Memling and adds some of his exquisite portrait paintings. 225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, 212-685-0008, themorgan.org.” (Cotter)

and you should be sure to check out the special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish)

at the very least you will want to see these two:
‘CELEBRATING THE ARTS OF JAPAN: THE MARY GRIGGS BURKE COLLECTION’ (through May 2017)
“This lavish collection of 160 objects came to the Met from the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation in early 2015. The Burkes loved Japanese art — all of it — and the exhibition is close to compendious in terms of media, from wood-carved Buddhas to bamboo baskets, with a particular strength in painting, early and late. The quality of the work? Japan thinks highly enough of it to have made the Burke holdings the first Japanese collection from abroad ever to show at Tokyo National Museum. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

‘JERUSALEM 1000–1400: EVERY PEOPLE UNDER HEAVEN’ (through Jan. 8)
“Three major faiths — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — have called Jerusalem their own, and its varying histories as a sacred space, a theater of conflict and a cosmopolitan cultural emporium are reflected in this exhibition modeled along classic Met epic lines: 200 fascinating objects from 60 international collections, with a time frame in the past and context in the present (in the form of short videos in each gallery). If much of the art is small, the effect is not. We see a city otherworldly and monumental, but also one of appetites, personalities and ethnic tensions as real today as they ever were. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW)

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (SUN 11am-1pm PWYW) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 09/28 and 09/26.
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This week’s fave and FREE NYCity AppS: 
Trip Advisor
An enormous base of NYCity user reviews (2.1 million) provides the widest coverage of hotels (468), restaurants (12,645) and things to do (yes, 3,246). Have a specific question? Then try one of Trip Advisor’s forums. Just remember that with all those reviews you have to try to find the consistency among the comments, and ignore the outliers.

OpenTable
Instantly locate restaurants near you with open reservations and then place a reservation right from your iOS device. A great interface and the ability to see a menu from the restaurant you’re interested in makes this my go to restaurant reservation app.

Subway Time 
Need to catch your #1,2,3 subway to attend an event? Use the Subway Time app from the MTA to find out when the next train arrives at your station. The MTA also has Bus Time info available on their mobile website.
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