Selected NYC Events (10/24) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Annual NYC Events / Oct.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

New York Television Festival (Oct.24-29)
Times, locations and prices vary.
“Each fall, all of the Festival’s individual development initiatives culminate at the annual New York Television Festival in Manhattan. The week-long celebration features screenings of the best independently-produced content, panels and talkbacks with industry leaders and creative luminaries, and red-carpet premieres with the stars and creatives behind the seasons’ most anticipated new network and cable shows.”

Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra
Lincoln Center, Broadway and 64th St./ 8PM, $25+
“International Chopin Competition first-prize winner Seong-Jin Cho joins the Warsaw Philharmonic for Chopin’s romantic First Piano Concerto. “Unequivocally brilliant,” raves The Telegraph of London.

Also Music Director Jacek Kaspszyk conducts Brahms’ “Tragic Overture” and the New York premiere of Mieczysław Weinberg’s Fourth Symphony. A legendary orchestra on its 115th anniversary. With a brilliant young Chopin Competition winner in his New York concerto debut.”

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

When Paris Sizzled: The 1920s Paris of Hemingway, Chanel, Cocteau, Cole Porter, Josephine Baker, and Their Friends
Mid-Manhattan Library, 5th Ave & 40th St./ 6:30PM, FREE
with Mary McAuliffe, author of “Dawn of the Belle Epoque,” “Twilight of the Belle Epoque,” “Clash of Crowns,” and “Paris Discovered.”
“This lecture portrays the City of Light during the fabulous 1920s, les Annees folles, when Parisians emerged from the horrors of war to find that a new world greeted them one that reverberated with the hard metallic clang of the assembly line, the roar of automobiles, and the beat of jazz. It traces a decade that saw seismic change on almost every front, from art and architecture to music, literature, fashion, entertainment, transportation, and, most notably, behavior.”

Public Lecture Series with Jason Kendall
The Explorers Club, 6 E. 70th St./ 7PM, $25
“The Hubble Space Telescope may have pulled off its neatest trick: discovering a galaxy that dates back to just 400 million years after the beginning of time. Before the next-generation space telescope comes on line, learn more about the expansion of the universe and how it’s measured, including how to perceive “the stretching of the fabric of space and time itself over the entire cosmos.” (ThoughtGallery..org)

ARCHTOBER (through Oct. 31)
“Tours, talks, exhibitions — it’s difficult to keep track of all the events going on during New York’s annual monthlong celebration of architecture and design. Each day features a building of the day, with a tour. Make reservations early; coveted tours sell out quickly. Among the options for the coming week is the Beaux-Arts landmark Gould Memorial Library, at Bronx Community College (Wednesday at noon). Other highlights include the panel discussion “Authenticity and Innovation: The Inherent Value of Older Buildings,” with the speakers Contantine Kontakosta, a professor at New York University; Charles Bendit, the co-chief executive of Taconic Investment Partners; and Claire Weisz, principal-in-charge at WXY architecture + urban design (Tuesday at 6 p.m., at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village). More information at archtober.org.” (NYT-AroundTown)

TODAY’S events include: National September 11 Memorial & Museum / 12PM
The Stories They Tell: Trees of Steel
“Every Monday in October, 9/11 Memorial staff will present a short talk about the architectural history of the World Trade Center site as exemplified by the tridents, iconic forked beams that withstood the collapse of the Twin Towers on 9/11. These talks will take place in the Museum Auditorium and are free with Museum admission.”

OPERA IN POP CULTURE
Opera Learning Center, Rose Building at Lincoln Center, 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue/ 5:30PM, $22
“With its history of four centuries, the operatic art form has found its way into many aspects of pop culture. From TV commercials to bestselling books to heavy metal music, opera and its themes are part of our lives in ways we may not always realize. Join William Berger as he explores these familiar and unexpected connections.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

A three-part series of talks hosted by the Metropolitan Opera Guild and led by William Berger, the author and co-host of the Met’s radio broadcasts. It began with Opera and Literature, and Opera in Pop Music; finishes tonight with Opera in Film.

HOT TKT – OCT.27
PULITZER CENTENNIAL POETRY CELEBRATION
The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 7 E7th St./ 7PM, $15
They say it’s a once-in-a-lifetime event.
“In recognition of the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes, thirteen recipients of the poetry award will gather to share original works as well as selections from other winners. The poets presenting are Rae Armantrout, Peter Balakian, Carl Dennis, Stephen Dunn, Jorie Graham, Yusef Komunyakaa, Sharon Olds, Gregory Pardlo, Philip Schultz, Vijay Seshadri, Natasha Trethewey, and Charles Wright; music by the composer David Lang will be performed by the violinist Johnny Gandelsman and the pianist Pedja Muzijevic.”

PLUS FOR CIDER FANS – CIDER WEEK
“Spend a week flitting about Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Hudson Valley sipping on dozens of hard ciders from makers including Original Sin, Eve’s Cidery, Foggy Ridge Cider, Steampunk Cider and more. The cider celebration includes tastings, dinners and classes (like a cider and cheese pairing class), as well as centerpiece events like the Lower East Cider Fest on Sunday and the Cider Revival on Monday.”

WHEN | WHERE Friday, Oct. 21, to Sunday, Oct. 30, at various venues including the Lower East Cider Fest on Orchard Street between Houston and Delancey streets INFO Free-$250; ciderweeknyc.com. (Newsday)

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Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite music venues, most on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 58 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM:
‘AGNES MARTIN’ (through Jan. 11)
Agnes Martin was born in Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1912, lived in New York City in the 1950s and ’60s, and spent the rest of her life in New Mexico, where she died in 2004. More than 100 of her paintings and drawings now float up the ramps of the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda in the most out-of-this-world-beautiful show in this space in years. Her art is about faint colors and subliminal lines; to see it requires sustained looking and some moving around: Stand back, then move up close. By the time you reach the final painting, high up under the museum’s great skylight, you’ve been through a rich life, and had a spirit-lifting, body-lightening lesson in what abstraction can be and can do. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org. (Cotter)

MET BREUER:
‘DIANE ARBUS: IN THE BEGINNING’ (through Nov. 27)
“This show of 100 or so early photographs by Arbus (1923-71), many on view for the first time, has a terrific installation, with work hung on columnlike panels that suggest rows of doors receding into darkness. The pictures themselves, dating between 1956 and 1962, have a grainy, moody texture, and they reveal an Arbus who had already landed on some of her favored themes: childhood, negotiable gender, fringe culture and class. If the show as a whole is more powerful than most of its individual images, there are some wonderful things. And as a forecast of mature work to come — familiar examples are included in a separate gallery — it is utterly magnetic. 945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street, Manhattan, 212-535-0177, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM:
‘HANS MEMLING: PORTRAITURE, PIETY AND A REUNITED ALTARPIECE’ (through January 2017)
“When it comes to jewels, there are Taylor-Burton rocks and discreetly cut heirloom stones. With museum shows, it’s the same. This one, at the Morgan Library, is a minute but invaluable gem. Set in a 20-by-20-by-20-foot gallery known as the Cube, it reunites, for the first time in the United States, dispersed sections of an altarpiece by the 15th-century German-born, Flanders-based Memling and adds some of his exquisite portrait paintings. 225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, 212-685-0008, themorgan.org.” (Cotter)

and you should be sure to check out the special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish)

at the very least you will want to see these two:
‘CELEBRATING THE ARTS OF JAPAN: THE MARY GRIGGS BURKE COLLECTION’ (through May 2017)
“This lavish collection of 160 objects came to the Met from the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation in early 2015. The Burkes loved Japanese art — all of it — and the exhibition is close to compendious in terms of media, from wood-carved Buddhas to bamboo baskets, with a particular strength in painting, early and late. The quality of the work? Japan thinks highly enough of it to have made the Burke holdings the first Japanese collection from abroad ever to show at Tokyo National Museum. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

‘JERUSALEM 1000–1400: EVERY PEOPLE UNDER HEAVEN’ (through Jan. 8)
“Three major faiths — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — have called Jerusalem their own, and its varying histories as a sacred space, a theater of conflict and a cosmopolitan cultural emporium are reflected in this exhibition modeled along classic Met epic lines: 200 fascinating objects from 60 international collections, with a time frame in the past and context in the present (in the form of short videos in each gallery). If much of the art is small, the effect is not. We see a city otherworldly and monumental, but also one of appetites, personalities and ethnic tensions as real today as they ever were. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW)

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (SUN 11am-1pm PWYW) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 10/22 and 10/20.
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This week’s fave and FREE NYCity AppS: 
Trip Advisor
An enormous base of NYCity user reviews (2.1 million) provides the widest coverage of hotels (468), restaurants (12,645) and things to do (yes, 3,246). Have a specific question? Then try one of Trip Advisor’s forums. Just remember that with all those reviews you have to try to find the consistency among the comments, and ignore the outliers.

OpenTable
Instantly locate restaurants near you with open reservations and then place a reservation right from your iOS device. A great interface and the ability to see a menu from the restaurant you’re interested in makes this my go to restaurant reservation app.

Subway Time 
Need to catch your #1,2,3 subway to attend an event? Use the Subway Time app from the MTA to find out when the next train arrives at your station. The MTA also has Bus Time info available on their mobile website.
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