Selected NYC Events (10/30) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Annual NYC Events / Oct.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

The Ghost Train Orchestra: The Unsung Composers of Harlem and Chicago Jazz at the Height of the Prohibition
Dizzy’s Club, Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 60th St.&Broadway / 7:30PM, $40
Presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center and the New York Hot Jazz Festival

“It’s hot jazz weekend at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola! For the first set of our final night, co-presented with the New York Hot Jazz Festival, we welcome Brooklyn’s Ghost Train Orchestra. This little big band is renowned for performing almost-forgotten musical gems of the 1920s, ‘30s, and ‘40s. For one set only, they will light up the stage with tunes from 1926–1931, originally made famous by Tiny Parham, Charlie Johnson, Fess Williams, John Nesbitt, and Don Redman.”

This set is part of Hot Jazz Age: From the First Jazz Recording to the Dawn of Swing (1917-1934), presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center and the New York Hot Jazz Festival, October 28-30.”

Music, Dance, Performing Arts

CHICK COREA AT THE BLUE NOTE
Blue Note, 131 W 3rd St./ 8PM, +10:30PM, $
“Mr. Corea recently turned 75, and decided to celebrate with a big gesture: an eight-week club engagement, with a highlight reel of bands. This weekend he closes out a stretch with For Miles, an all-star, multi-era tribute to Miles Davis.
Next Wednesday and Thursday he revisits the music from his 1981 album “Three Quartets,” leading a band with Ben Solomon on saxophones, Eddie Gomez on bass and Steve Gadd on drums.
For a full schedule, visit bluenote.net.” (Chinen-NYT)

AMERICAN BALLET THEATER (LAST DAY)
NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center/ 2PM, $30-$160
“Ballet Theater’s fall season concludes with Benjamin Millepied’s Greek-inspired “Daphnis and Chloe,” which is joined by Frederick Ashton’s intimate midcentury study in pure classicism, “Symphonic Variations, and delicate “Monotones I and II” (Brian Schaefer-NYT)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

A CITY AND A CHURCH: THE REMARKABLE HISTORY OF ST. PAUL’S CHAPEL AND THE STREETS BEYOND THE DOORS
St. Paul’s Chapel, Broadway at Fulton St./ 4:15PM, FREE
“This weekend is the 250th anniversary of St. Paul’s Chapel, a history-rich house of worship that survived both the Revolutionary War and the attacks of Sept. 11. (The tiny church is across the street from the World Trade Center site.) Learn more about the history of St. Paul’s at this talk with Kenneth Jackson, a professor of history and social sciences at Columbia University.” (NYT-AroundTown)

ARCHTOBER (through Oct. 31)
TODAY’S events include:
Building of the Day: The Battery
“After 22 years, the redesign of The Battery, one of the city’s most historic and dramatic public spaces, is more than 90% complete. Quennell Rothschild & Partners was part of the team leading The Battery’s transformation from an asphalt-intensive Moses-era park into a verdant oasis worthy of its history and role as global destination. The Battery Conservancy and the New York City Parks Department are the clients.

The park’s major gathering space, The Battery Oval, opened this summer. A two-acre lawn shaded by mature trees, the Oval can accommodate up to 10,000 people. Also complete is the restoration and relocation of ten of the 23 monuments representing our nation’s explorers, defenders, and inventors. Previously scattered haphazardly around the park, these monuments have been moved to positions of dignified prominence along The Battery’s perimeter. The bidirectional, dedicated bikeway, is flanked with colorful plantings by Piet Oudolf; cyclists also benefit from an upgraded comfort station. Sustainable features include the reduction of impervious areas and new paths that minimize risk to the 250 old trees. These improvements join The Battery’s existing attractions—breathtaking harbor views, the lush Bosque Gardens, SeaGlass Carousel, and Battery Urban Farm.”

“Tours, talks, exhibitions — it’s difficult to keep track of all the events going on during New York’s annual monthlong celebration of architecture and design. Each day features a building of the day, with a tour. Make reservations early; coveted tours sell out quickly. More information at archtober.org.” (NYT-AroundTown)

Elsewhere, but this one looks like fun, and worth the detour:

The Science of Fear
A Talk by Dr. Rosemarie Perry, Ph.D.
Post Office, 188 Havemeyer St./ 7PM, FREE, requires registration
Celebrate Halloween and Science with Know Science!
Costumes encouraged!

BOO!
It’s that spooky time of year again. Whether it’s ghosts, clowns, or something else that you fear, it’s a feeling we’ve all experienced before. But what is fear? Is it helpful or harmful? And from where does fear originate? In this talk, Dr. Perry will answer these questions and more as she discusses the science of fear and how it operates in our bodies.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

PLUS FOR CIDER FANS – CIDER WEEK (LAST DAY)
“Spend a week flitting about Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Hudson Valley sipping on dozens of hard ciders from makers including Original Sin, Eve’s Cidery, Foggy Ridge Cider, Steampunk Cider and more. The cider celebration includes tastings, dinners and classes (like a cider and cheese pairing class), as well as centerpiece events like the Lower East Cider Fest on Sunday and the Cider Revival on Monday.”

WHEN | WHERE Friday, Oct. 21, to Sunday, Oct. 30, at various venues including the Lower East Cider Fest on Orchard Street between Houston and Delancey streets INFO Free-$250; ciderweeknyc.com. (Newsday)

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Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite music venues, most on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 58 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2016.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM:
‘AGNES MARTIN’ (through Jan. 11, 2017)
Agnes Martin was born in Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1912, lived in New York City in the 1950s and ’60s, and spent the rest of her life in New Mexico, where she died in 2004. More than 100 of her paintings and drawings now float up the ramps of the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda in the most out-of-this-world-beautiful show in this space in years. Her art is about faint colors and subliminal lines; to see it requires sustained looking and some moving around: Stand back, then move up close. By the time you reach the final painting, high up under the museum’s great skylight, you’ve been through a rich life, and had a spirit-lifting, body-lightening lesson in what abstraction can be and can do. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, at 89th Street, 212-423-3500, guggenheim.org. (Cotter)

MET BREUER:
‘DIANE ARBUS: IN THE BEGINNING’ (through Nov. 27)
“This show of 100 or so early photographs by Arbus (1923-71), many on view for the first time, has a terrific installation, with work hung on columnlike panels that suggest rows of doors receding into darkness. The pictures themselves, dating between 1956 and 1962, have a grainy, moody texture, and they reveal an Arbus who had already landed on some of her favored themes: childhood, negotiable gender, fringe culture and class. If the show as a whole is more powerful than most of its individual images, there are some wonderful things. And as a forecast of mature work to come — familiar examples are included in a separate gallery — it is utterly magnetic. 945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street, Manhattan, 212-535-0177, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM:
‘HANS MEMLING: PORTRAITURE, PIETY AND A REUNITED ALTARPIECE’ (through January 2017)
“When it comes to jewels, there are Taylor-Burton rocks and discreetly cut heirloom stones. With museum shows, it’s the same. This one, at the Morgan Library, is a minute but invaluable gem. Set in a 20-by-20-by-20-foot gallery known as the Cube, it reunites, for the first time in the United States, dispersed sections of an altarpiece by the 15th-century German-born, Flanders-based Memling and adds some of his exquisite portrait paintings. 225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, 212-685-0008, themorgan.org.” (Cotter)

and you should be sure to check out the special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish)

at the very least you will want to see these two:
‘CELEBRATING THE ARTS OF JAPAN: THE MARY GRIGGS BURKE COLLECTION’ (through May 2017)
“This lavish collection of 160 objects came to the Met from the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation in early 2015. The Burkes loved Japanese art — all of it — and the exhibition is close to compendious in terms of media, from wood-carved Buddhas to bamboo baskets, with a particular strength in painting, early and late. The quality of the work? Japan thinks highly enough of it to have made the Burke holdings the first Japanese collection from abroad ever to show at Tokyo National Museum. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

‘JERUSALEM 1000–1400: EVERY PEOPLE UNDER HEAVEN’ (through Jan. 8,2017)
“Three major faiths — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — have called Jerusalem their own, and its varying histories as a sacred space, a theater of conflict and a cosmopolitan cultural emporium are reflected in this exhibition modeled along classic Met epic lines: 200 fascinating objects from 60 international collections, with a time frame in the past and context in the present (in the form of short videos in each gallery). If much of the art is small, the effect is not. We see a city otherworldly and monumental, but also one of appetites, personalities and ethnic tensions as real today as they ever were. 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org.” (Cotter)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW)

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (SUN 11am-1pm PWYW) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 10/28 and 10/26.
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This week’s fave and FREE NYCity AppS: 
Trip Advisor
An enormous base of NYCity user reviews (2.1 million) provides the widest coverage of hotels (468), restaurants (12,645) and things to do (yes, 3,246). Have a specific question? Then try one of Trip Advisor’s forums. Just remember that with all those reviews you have to try to find the consistency among the comments, and ignore the outliers.

OpenTable
Instantly locate restaurants near you with open reservations and then place a reservation right from your iOS device. A great interface and the ability to see a menu from the restaurant you’re interested in makes this my go to restaurant reservation app.

Subway Time 
Need to catch your #1,2,3 subway to attend an event? Use the Subway Time app from the MTA to find out when the next train arrives at your station. The MTA also has Bus Time info available on their mobile website.
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