Selected NYC Events (03/03) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Sweet 6 NYC Events >FRIDAY/MAR.03, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-Mar.”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Eddie Palmieri: Celebrating 80 Years(thru Mar.04)
Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center/ 8PM, $90+
“Mr. Palmieri has brought a rock ’n’ roll energy and a drummer’s pummeling flair to the piano since the 1960s. Back then he led a famous salsa band, La Perfecta, before embarking on a range of jazz-fusion projects. Mr. Palmieri appears here with his 16-piece orchestra in a celebration of his 80th birthday. The band includes the fabulous lead vocalist Herman Olivera and the strong trumpeter Brian Lynch. Don’t expect to stay in your seat for long.” (NYT- GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>>Kelly Burke: Love for Sale
>>John Pizzarelli Trio +Special Guest Jerry Weldon
>>CRAIG TABORN
>>Armory Show
>>Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain and the Birth of the American Empire

Plus Continuing Events:
>>The Orchid Show

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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Kelly Burke: Love for Sale (LAST DAY)
Huron Club, 17 Vandam St./ 5PM, $40
image-1“English singer-actor Burke makes her U.S. debut in a “cabaret-play” set in the 1930s, featuring songs by Kurt Weill and others. The winning Charlie Alterman costars as her pianist.” (TONY)

“Developed for London’s historic Wilton’s Music Hall, and following sell-out performances in London and Edinburgh, Love for Sale is a 1930’s cabaret celebrating the music of Kurt Weill, Cole Porter and their contemporaries. Featuring OffWestEnd Award nominee Kelly Burke and Broadway musical director Charlie Alterman (Pippin, Next to Normal).
“A heartfelt, stylish show – as intelligent as it is decadent” The List

John Pizzarelli Trio +Special Guest Jerry Weldon (thru Mar.04)
Birdland, / 8:30PM, +11PM, $50
“John Pizzarelli charms audiences with his warmth, sense of humor and musical chops. Through his multi-faceted career as a jazz guitarist, vocalist and bandleader, the son of the legendary guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli and New Jersey native, has become one of the most recognizable faces and voices in contemporary jazz for his interpretations of classic standards, romantic ballads and the cool jazz flavor he brings to his performances and recordings.”

CRAIG TABORN (Feb. 28 through March 5)
at the Village Vanguard / 8:30PM, +10:30PM $30.
“Mr. Taborn, a masterly pianist, is celebrating this month’s release of “Daylight Ghosts,” his third album on ECM and his first with a quartet. It has a standard format — Chris Speed on saxophone and clarinet, Chris Lightcap on bass, and Dave King on drums — but a different kind of sound that cools and focuses your ear. Mr. Taborn is a kind of miniaturist, building small and powerful patterns; clearing space for Mr. Speed’s simple, threadlike saxophone; and letting force accumulate without clouding the picture. All the album’s musicians will join him for this string of twice-nightly performances.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Armory Show (thru Mar.05)
Pier 94, W55th St., at 12th Ave./
“This week, one of the city’s biggest contemporary-art extravaganzas, the Armory Show, takes over two piers (92 and 94) on the Hudson River. (March 2-5; on March 1, MOMA kicks things off with a big party at the museum.) The fair has jazzed things up this year with multiple installations, most notably a large hanging chicken-shaped sculpture by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei.” (NewYorker)

Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain and the Birth of the American Empire
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave./ 12PM, $25
Stephen Kinzer transports us to the dawn of the twentieth century, when the United States first found itself with the chance to dominate faraway lands.

That prospect thrilled some Americans and horrified others with the country’s best-known political and intellectual leaders taking sides. Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge and William Randolph Hearst pushed for imperial expansion; Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington and Andrew Carnegie preached restraint. Delve into each side’s arguments and appreciate how remarkably current they still are today.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

And don’t forget these continuing events:

The Orchid Show (thru April 09)
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx.
“This edition of the New York Botanical Garden’s annual Orchid Show, now in its fifteenth year, focusses on Thailand’s rich history and the flower’s cultural status as one of the country’s leading exports. Held in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the display features blooming orchids by the hundreds in lush tropical environments, leading into an arched installment styled in the manner of a traditional Thai pavilion. The schedule includes several panel discussions, tours, and after-hours viewings with music and cocktails.” (NewYorker)

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Bonus NYC Events – Music Venues:
So much fine live music every night in this town. These are my favorite non jazz music venues on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who’s playing tonight:

City Winery – 155 Varick St., citywinery.com, 212-608-0555
Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W54th St., 54below.com, 646-476-3551
Joe’s Pub @ Public Theater – 425 Lafayette St., joespub.com, 212-967-7555
Metropolitan Room – 34W22ndSt., metropolitan room.com, 212-206-0440
Beacon Theatre – 2124 Broadway @ 74th St., beacontheatre.com, 212-465-6500
Town Hall – 123 W43rd St., thetownhall.org, 212-997-6661
B.B. King’s Blues Bar – 237W42nd St., bbkingblues.com, 212-997-2144
Bowery Ballroom – 6 Delancey St. boweryballroom.com,
Le Poisson Rouge – 158 Bleecker St., lepoissonrouge.com, 212-505-3474

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. caffevivaldi.com, 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:
‘FROM THE COLLECTION: 1960-1969’ (through March 12)
“MoMA shakes up its sanctum sanctorum, installing half of its permanent collection galleries with works chosen by 17 curators from a single decade: the tumultuous 1960s. The limited time frame is balanced by unprecedented breadth and variety. As never before, the presentation mixes together objects and artworks from all six of the museum’s curatorial departments. The blend is alternately stimulating and bewildering, revelatory and infuriating: yet another symptom of the museum’s limited curatorial mind-set. 212-708-9400, moma.org.” (Smith)

‘FRANCIS PICABIA: OUR HEADS ARE ROUND SO OUR THOUGHTS CAN CHANGE DIRECTION’ (through March 19).
“The restless career of one of the great provocateurs of early modernism finally gets its due from the Museum of Modern Art, healthfully perturbing that institution’s emphasis on linear progress and creative genius with radically shifting styles and tones. His lush, large-scale Cubist paintings; machine-based images; Dada anti-art and magazines; several returns to figuration; and final abstract styles are all present and give no quarter.” (Smith)

 ‘TONY OURSLER: IMPONDERABLE’ (through April 16)
“This small exhibition is centered on a 90-minute film in which episodes from the history of spiritualist frauds and hoaxes are re-enacted by people in fanciful costumes while mystic flames, smoke and ectoplasmic phenomena come and go. At certain moments during “Imponderable,” you feel breezes wafting over you and hear loud thumping under the theater’s risers. The crudeness of these effects is part of the generally comical spirit. It’s all about the confusion between illusion and reality to which human beings seem to be congenitally susceptible.” (Johnson)

And a special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

FAST FORWARD: PAINTING FROM THE 1980S (thru May 14)
“Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s presents a focused look at painting from this decade with works drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection.

In the 1980s, painting recaptured the imagination of the contemporary art world against a backdrop of expansive change. An unprecedented number of galleries appeared on the scene, particularly in downtown New York. Groundbreaking exhibitions—that blurred distinctions between high and low art—were presented at alternative and artist-run spaces. New mediums, including video and installation art, were on the rise. Yet despite the growing popularity of photography and video, many artists actively embraced painting, freely exploring its bold physicality and unique capacity for expression and innovation.

The exhibition includes work by artists often identified with this explosive period—Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and Julian Schnabel—as well as by several lesser-known painters. These artists explored the traditions of figuration and history painting, and offered new interpretations of abstraction. Many addressed fundamental questions about artmaking in their work, while others took on political issues including AIDS, feminism, gentrification, and war. In the face of a media-saturated environment, artists in the 1980s recommitted to painting. Far from dead, painting came to represent an important intersection between new ways of seeing and a seemingly traditional way of making art.”

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right sidebar dated 03/01 and 02/27.
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