Selected NYC Events (05/14) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events > SUNDAY/MAY 14, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-May”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Lea Salonga (May 11-22)
Feinstein’s/54 Below, 254 W 54thSt./ 7PM, $95+
“The radiant star of Broadway’s Miss Saigon and Allegiance (and Disney’s Mulan and Aladdin) returns to the cabaret stage with a show that includes show tunes, standards and pop songs.” (TONY)

“After a sold-out engagement last April, Lea Salonga returns to Feinstein’s/54 Below with a show The New York Times called “one of the year’s most satisfying cabaret shows” and Theatermania touted as “unmissable”! Salonga smartly weaves together a set list of her favorite standards, go-to pop tunes, and Broadway ballads. This trio of piano, guitar, and voice ensures an intimate experience with a true Broadway icon. Salonga joins us for a record-breaking run of 15 performances this spring!”

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6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

>>VIJAY IYER TRIO
>>NYC Ballet
>>Chucho Valdés Quartet 75th Birthday Celebration
>>WARREN WOLF QUARTET 
>>Japan Day
>>Food Book Fair

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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

VIJAY IYER TRIO (LAST DAY)
at the Village Vanguard / 8:30 and 10:30PM, $30
“The pianist, MacArthur fellow and Harvard professor Vijay Iyer has been performing steadily with his trio for about a decade. The group’s urgent flow and turbid harmonic beauty have made it one of the few obvious answers to the question, “What’s exciting in jazz today?” But astonishingly, it has never before played the Village Vanguard, a rite of passage in the music. Appearing here with Mr. Iyer, in twice-nightly performances Tuesday through May 14, are the bassist Stephan Crump and the drummer Tyshawn Sorey (who does not typically record with the trio, but will play in a sextet on Mr. Iyer’s next album).” (GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO-NYT)

NYC Ballet (thru May 28)
NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 8PM. $30+
“Of the works in City Ballet’s four-week Here/Now festival, those by Justin Peck, the company’s artist in residence, have been among the freshest — the most aligned with the festival’s title. On Friday Mr. Peck unveils his third collaboration with the indie composer Sufjan Stevens, “The Decalogue,” performed by 10 dancers to a commissioned score for solo piano. It repeats on Sunday, Thursday and May 20, sharing a bill with ballets by Lynne Taylor-Corbett, Jorma Elo and Peter Martins.” (GIA KOURLAS – NYT)

Chucho Valdés Quartet 75th Birthday Celebration (LAST DAY)
Blue Note, 131 W. 3rd St./ 8PM,+10:30PM, $40-$55
“A powerhouse virtuoso, the Cuban pianist Valdés remains a force of nature, both lushly romantic and bitingly percussive in his sweeping improvisations. Celebrating his seventy-fifth birthday at the helm of a galvanic quartet, Valdés will demonstrate an undiminished ability to fuse Afro-Caribbean rhythms and Stateside hard bop with joyous abandon.” (NewYorker)

WARREN WOLF QUARTET
at Smoke Jazz Club, / 7, 9 and 10:30 p.m.; $38
“Mr. Wolf, a multi-instrumentalist who focuses on the vibraphone, strikes a comfortable balance between stately precision and trenchant swing. He’s best known for his work with the bassist Christian McBride and the SFJazz Collective, but don’t miss his own formidable catalog, including last year’s “Convergence,” on Mack Avenue. Mr. Wolf appears here with Russell Hall on bass and Rodney Green on drums. Alex Brown will be at the piano on Friday and Sunday; Emmet Cohen takes his place on Saturday.” (GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO-NYT)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Japan Day
Naumburg Bandshell Central Park; / 8am, FREE
“Make the most of a sunny afternoon in Central Park at the annual Japan Day, an all-day celebration of Japanese culture that unfolds under trees in full bloom. The party starts with a 5K run at 8am hosted by New York Road Runners. Then, starting at 9:30, you can explore the activity tents and learn calligraphy and origami, get your face painted Kabuki-style, and take a photograph with Hello Kitty herself. On the live stage, catch Japanese taiko drumming, karate and musical performances, and pick up some mouthwatering ramen, okonomiyaki and other traditional Japanese bites at the food tents. Gotta try ’em all!” (TONY)

Food Book Fair 
If you’re excited about all things food – eating talking about it reading books and magazines about it – then this annual event is for you. They will be workshops, panels, so launch, signage, cocktail hours, tastings, screenings, readings, meals and more. Participants include Mario Batali April Bloomfield Frank Bruni, Emma Staub.” (STAV ZIV-Newsday)
WHEN | WHERE Thursday, May 11, to Sunday, May 14,
the Ace Hotel, New York, 20 W. 29th St.
INFO $5­$150; foodbookfair.com.

Mad. Sq. Eats (thru Jun 03)
General Worth Square; 11am; free access
“Twice a year, this outdoor food fest brings buzzworthy bites from the city’s best restaurants to Worth Square in the Flatiron District. Best eats include Roberta’s sensational pizza, MeltKraft grilled cheese sandwiches and cheesesteaks by the Truffleist. The one-stop shop for the tastiest grub in town will be available every day until June 3, so make sure to wear your stretchy pants.” (TONY)

And don’t forget this annual outer borough event:
Day 3 of Bronx Week 2017, which celebrates the citizens of the borough with events through May 21. Times and prices vary.
And while you are in the Bronx you won’t want to miss this:
CHIHULY (thru Oct.29)
New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd./ $20 to $25
“Step into the sublimely colorful mind of multimedia artist Dale Chihuly at this larger-than-life exhibition, where over twenty of the celebrated creators’ gigantic pieces will take over the 250-acre grounds of the New York Botanical Garden, with installations created especially for the exhibit. Don’t miss special after-dark hours to experience the glassworks illuminated.”

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL (through June 11).
This is arguably the best Biennial in years, and perhaps the best ever in its combination of demographics, aesthetics and political urgency. Nearly half of the featured artists are female, and half nonwhite. Their works reach from figure painting to virtual reality. Income inequality, racism, misogyny, immigration and violence are confronted in ways that set a high standard for social engagement sustained by formal ambition. (Smith-NYT)
212-570-3600, whitney.org

FAST FORWARD: PAINTING FROM THE 1980S (LAST DAY)
“Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s presents a focused look at painting from this decade with works drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection.

In the 1980s, painting recaptured the imagination of the contemporary art world against a backdrop of expansive change. An unprecedented number of galleries appeared on the scene, particularly in downtown New York. Groundbreaking exhibitions—that blurred distinctions between high and low art—were presented at alternative and artist-run spaces. New mediums, including video and installation art, were on the rise. Yet despite the growing popularity of photography and video, many artists actively embraced painting, freely exploring its bold physicality and unique capacity for expression and innovation.

The exhibition includes work by artists often identified with this explosive period—Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and Julian Schnabel—as well as by several lesser-known painters. These artists explored the traditions of figuration and history painting, and offered new interpretations of abstraction. Many addressed fundamental questions about artmaking in their work, while others took on political issues including AIDS, feminism, gentrification, and war. In the face of a media-saturated environment, artists in the 1980s recommitted to painting. Far from dead, painting came to represent an important intersection between new ways of seeing and a seemingly traditional way of making art.”

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

American Museum of Natural History:

Mummies (thru 1/7/18)
“For thousands of years, peoples around the world practiced mummification as a way of preserving and honoring their dead. Mummies brings you face to face with some of these ancient individuals and reveals how scientists are using modern technology to glean stunning details about them and their cultures. In Mummies, ancient remains from the Nile Valley of Africa and the Andes Mountains of South America will be on view, allowing visitors to connect with cultures from the distant past. Mummification, a more widespread practice than most think, was used not only for royal Egyptians but also for common people and even animals. Interactive touch tables let visitors virtually “unravel” or see inside mummies as they delve deep into the unique stories of the people or animals who lie within. Other parts of the exhibition showcase the latest isotopic and DNA testing being performed on mummies, and explain how these sophisticated analytical techniques are helping scientists discover important clues about long-vanished practices. Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.” (NY CityGuide)

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PLUS, These wonderful museum exhibitions elsewhere, continue through this period:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: LIVING MODERN’ at the Brooklyn Museum (through July 23). Given that most artists are to some extent dandies, it would be wrong to view this fascinating show through an exclusively feminist lens. But it does demonstrate the powerful, carefully cultivated aesthetic and inborn independence that connects the art, wardrobe, living spaces and public persona of America’s first celebrity artist. In and around her art, she redefined gender and style. (Roberta Smith-NYT)
718-638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org

(3/3-7/3) Georgia O’Keeffe: “Living Modern” provides a new look at an iconic American artist at the very institution that hosted her first solo museum exhibition in 1927—the Brooklyn Museum. Presenting O’Keeffe’s remarkable wardrobe in dialogue with iconic paintings and photographs, this singular exhibition focuses in on the modernist persona O’Keeffe crafted for herself. With photographs by luminaries like Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, and Annie Leibovitz, the show reflects O’Keeffe’s radical rethinking of female identity, and the artist’s commitment to elements of modernism—minimalism, seriality, simplification—not only in her art, but also in her distinctive style of dress. (NYCity Guide)

(now-9/6/17) The newest show at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim, provides a rare chance to explore in-depth some of the key artists of this essential New York institution. Framed by the interests of six leading patrons, Visionaries brings together canvases from masters like Max Ernst, René Magritte, and Yves Tanguy, and sculptures by Joseph Cornell and Alberto Giacometti. In addition, Jackson Pollock’s Alchemy (1947) is being shown in the U.S. for the first time in nearly 50 years. More than a dozen works on paper by Picasso and Van Gogh, rarely on view to the public, can be seen in the Thannhauser Gallery, and paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, and Édouard Manet are displayed on the museum’s legendary ramps.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 05/12 and 05/10.
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