Selected NYC Events (05/26) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Super 7 NYC Events > FRIDAY/MAY 26, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-May”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

“Miles Davis Celebration”
Smoke Jazz Club, / 7, 9, 10:30PM, $40
“Celebrate the unforgettable music and the May 26th birthday of the legendary trumpeter Miles Davis. For more than 40 years, Miles was at the center of every major jazz innovation from bebop and cool to modal, fusion and beyond. His music continues to be an inspiration to most, if not all, jazz musicians working today including this all-star tribute quintet. With trumpeter Jeremy Pelt at the helm, this outstanding group also includes the great George Cables, Eric Alexander, John Webber and Mike Clark.”

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6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)

>>Bruce Barth and Ray Drummond
>>Bill Charlap Trio
>>GERALD CLAYTON
>>American Ballet Theatre  and NYC Ballet
>>Curators’ Talk: Magnum Manifesto
>> EDGAR ALLAN POE FESTIVAL
>>PLUS Mad. Sq. Eats

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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Bruce Barth and Ray Drummond (also Saturday)
Mezzrow, 163 W. 10th St./ 8PM, +9:30PM, $20-$25
“Unabashed swinging from assured and passionate improvisers is a gift that should be treasured while it still exists. The pianist Barth and the bassist Drummond may not come from the same generation—Drummond can be heard on memorable recordings by, among others, Art Farmer and Woody Shaw—but they share a commitment to direct and unpretentious musical expression.” (NewYorker)

Bill Charlap Trio (May 23 – 27)
With pianist Bill Charlap, bassist Peter Washington, and drummer Kenny Washington
Dizzy’s Club / 7:30PM +9:30PM, $35
“Charlap approaches a song the way a lover approaches his beloved…when he sits down to play, the result is an embrace, an act of possession. The tune rises, falls, disappears, and resurfaces in new forms as Charlap ranges over the keyboard with nimble, crisply swinging lines, subtly layered textures, dense chords, and spiky interjections.” TIME Magazine

One of the world’s premier jazz pianists, Bill Charlap has performed and recorded with modern masters ranging from Phil Woods and Wynton Marsalis, to Tony Bennett and Barbra Streisand. Since 1997, he has led the GRAMMY® Award-nominated Bill Charlap Trio with bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington, now recognized as a leading group in jazz. Veterans of top jazz clubs including the Village Vanguard, Birdland, and – of course – Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, this trio is exemplary for its jaw-dropping level of chemistry and on-the-fly interactivity, made possible by both technical chops and hard-earned experience.”

GERALD CLAYTON (Mat 23-28)
at the Village Vanguard / 8:30 and 10:30 p.m.$30
“If you could accuse the young pianist Gerald Clayton of anything, it would be of sometimes giving us resolution before we need it. A remarkable player, he seems to understand what our ear wants — blooming harmony, melodic improvisations, firm landings — and how to deliver it. On his new release, “Tributary Tales,” recorded with a core quintet and a handful of guests, he scrambles his formulas a little bit, and it’s all for the best. There’s higher contrast; the clouds hang a bit lower; and even the joyful passages feel rougher, more affecting. Here he’ll play in a trio with his longtime associates Joe Sanders on bass and Kendrick Scott on drums.” (GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO-NYT)

PLUS, for the remainder of May it is dueling ballet companies, as the city’s two major companies, A.B.T. and New York City Ballet, face off at Lincoln Center – only in NY.

American Ballet Theatre (thru July 08)
Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, $22+
“The company continues its spring season with performances of “Giselle,” through Wednesday, and Alexei Ratmansky’s “The Golden Cockerel,” based on Michel Fokine’s 1914 original, beginning on Thursday. This weekend brings a flurry of New York debuts in the leading roles of “Giselle,” including Misty Copeland and Alban Lendorf (Friday), Sarah Lane and Daniil Simikin (Saturday afternoon), and Gillian Murphy (Saturday evening). Ms. Murphy will dance alongside the consummately princely David Hallberg, in his first season back after a long recovery from injury.” (NYT-SIOBHAN BURKE)

Tonight: Giselle – “The epitome of Romantic ballet, this heart-rending tale of unrequited love, remorse, and forgiveness perfectly fuses music, movement, and drama. The role of Giselle requires an exquisite stylist with daring dramatic and technical skills, creating a compelling portrait of the innocent, yet ultimately noble, village maiden. In this universally acclaimed production, ABT’s unrivalled roster of international ballet stars brings Giselle’s mystery and ethereal beauty vividly to life.”

AND
NYC Ballet (thru May 28)
NYS/DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, $30+
“The Here/Now Festival is nearly over, which means one thing: It’s time to wipe the stage clean with the season’s glorious closer, George Balanchine’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” This 1962 ballet, filled with fairies and butterflies — and, of course, the antics of that mischievous goofball Puck — brings Shakespeare to dancing life in a beloved two-act production that starts out with arguments and misunderstandings and ends with a double wedding. For his version, Balanchine, who played an elf in a St. Petersburg production as a child, choreographed one of his most romantic pas de deux; this serene look at love is a jewel within a jewel.” (GIA KOURLAS – NYT)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Curators’ Talk: Magnum Manifesto
International Center of Photography, 250 Bowery/ 6:30PM, FREE
“Join us on the opening day of the landmark exhibition, “Magnum Manifesto,” for a unique opportunity to hear directly from renowned curator Clément Chéroux in conversation with Clara Bouveresse and ICP Associate Curator Pauline Vermare.

Chéroux, Bouveresse, and Vermare examine the history of Magnum Photos from the agency’s early days through of-the-moment current concerns. The talk will take up the thematic lenses that frame Magnum Manifesto, from human rights to the ways in which Magnum photographers have captured—and continue to capture—a world in flux and under threat.”

EDGAR ALLAN POE FESTIVAL
“Devoted fans of Edgar Allan Poe flock to this annual festival featuring performances of the author’s work, including “The Tell­Tale Heart,” “The Masque of the Red Death” and “The Cask of Amontillado.” Performers also tackle writers who were influenced by Poe, such as H.P. Lovecraft and Bram Stoker.” (STAV ZIV-Newsday)
WHEN | WHERE Through Saturday, May 27, at The Sanctuary, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 81 Christopher St.
INFO $24; 212 868­4444, radiotheatrenyc.com ­­

PLUS Mad. Sq. Eats (thru Jun 03)
General Worth Square; starts 11am; free access
“Twice a year, this outdoor food fest brings buzzworthy bites from the city’s best restaurants to Worth Square in the Flatiron District. Best eats include Roberta’s sensational pizza, MeltKraft grilled cheese sandwiches and cheesesteaks by the Truffleist. The one-stop shop for the tastiest grub in town will be available every day until June 3, so make sure to wear your stretchy pants.” (TONY)

The great food options here along with the lovely Madison Square Park across the street make an unbeatable combo.

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL (through June 11).
“This is arguably the best Biennial in years, and perhaps the best ever in its combination of demographics, aesthetics and political urgency. Nearly half of the featured artists are female, and half nonwhite. Their works reach from figure painting to virtual reality. Income inequality, racism, misogyny, immigration and violence are confronted in ways that set a high standard for social engagement sustained by formal ambition.” (Smith-NYT)
212-570-3600, whitney.org

Museum of Arts and Design (thru Aug 20)
2 Columbus Circle
Counter-Couture: Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture
“In all its sumptuous, ragtag, iconoclastic, and utopian forms, hippie clothing reflected the seismic cultural shifts of Vietnam War-era America, eschewing the mass-produced in favor of the personalized and the handmade. This captivating exhibition, installed in moodily lit galleries against purple-and-gold wallpaper, goes beyond the expected caftans and macramé to detail the nuances and extremes of countercultural aesthetics. A section devoted to stage costumes includes a medieval-inspired muumuu, its pastel-ombré velvet adorned with a starburst appliqué; Mama Cass Elliot, of the Mamas & the Papas, wore it in 1967. Nearby, looping film footage includes performance documentation of the Cockettes, an anarchic theatre group whose psychedelic, thrift-store drag sensibility helped shape a nascent queer aesthetic. From the Army-surplus garments appropriated and painstakingly embroidered by flower children to the dashikis and African fabrics embraced by the black-pride movement to the ascetic styles of communes and cults, the exhibition emphasizes how vernacular fashion signalled antiestablishment values and group identity. That said, high fashion isn’t neglected. One highlight is the visionary designer Kaisik Wong’s glittering, futuristic “wearable art,” which resembles armor and cocoons from another planet—or the next Aquarian age.” (NewYorker)

Museum of Modern Art:

‘ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG: AMONG FRIENDS’ (thru Sept.17)

“This retrospective of one of America’s great artists includes more than 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, sound and video recordings, prints and photographs created over the course of a six­decade career. Rauschenberg sometimes worked with artists, dancers, musicians and writers (including John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Yvonne Rainer and Jasper Johns), and the exhibition will be supplemented by dance and performance.” ( STAV ZIV-Newsday)

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

 The Museum of the City of New York:

NY at Its Core (ongoing)
“Ten years in the making, New York at Its Core tells the compelling story of New York’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” The exhibition captures the human energy that drove New York to become a city like no other and a subject of fascination the world over. Entertaining, inspiring, important, and at times bemusing, New York City “big personalities,” including Alexander Hamilton, Walt Whitman, Boss Tweed, Emma Goldman, JP Morgan, Fiorello La Guardia, Jane Jacobs, Jay-Z, and dozens more, parade through the exhibition. Visitors will also learn the stories of lesser-known New York personalities, like Lenape chieftain Penhawitz and Italian immigrant Susie Rocco. Even animals like the horse, the pig, the beaver, and the oyster, which played pivotal roles in the economy and daily life of New York, get their moment in the historical spotlight. Occupying the entire first floor in three interactive galleries (Port City, 1609-1898, World City, 1898-2012, and Future City Lab) New York at Its Core is shaped by four themes: money, density, diversity, and creativity. Together, they provide a lens for examining the character of the city, and underlie the modern global metropolis we know today. mcny.org” (NYCity Guide)

American Museum of Natural History:

Mummies (thru 1/7/18)
“For thousands of years, peoples around the world practiced mummification as a way of preserving and honoring their dead. Mummies brings you face to face with some of these ancient individuals and reveals how scientists are using modern technology to glean stunning details about them and their cultures. In Mummies, ancient remains from the Nile Valley of Africa and the Andes Mountains of South America will be on view, allowing visitors to connect with cultures from the distant past. Mummification, a more widespread practice than most think, was used not only for royal Egyptians but also for common people and even animals. Interactive touch tables let visitors virtually “unravel” or see inside mummies as they delve deep into the unique stories of the people or animals who lie within. Other parts of the exhibition showcase the latest isotopic and DNA testing being performed on mummies, and explain how these sophisticated analytical techniques are helping scientists discover important clues about long-vanished practices. Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.”(NYCity Guide)

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PLUS, These wonderful museum exhibitions elsewhere, continue through this period:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: LIVING MODERN’ at the Brooklyn Museum (through July 23). Given that most artists are to some extent dandies, it would be wrong to view this fascinating show through an exclusively feminist lens. But it does demonstrate the powerful, carefully cultivated aesthetic and inborn independence that connects the art, wardrobe, living spaces and public persona of America’s first celebrity artist. In and around her art, she redefined gender and style. (Roberta Smith-NYT)
718-638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org

(3/3-7/3) Georgia O’Keeffe: “Living Modern” provides a new look at an iconic American artist at the very institution that hosted her first solo museum exhibition in 1927—the Brooklyn Museum. Presenting O’Keeffe’s remarkable wardrobe in dialogue with iconic paintings and photographs, this singular exhibition focuses in on the modernist persona O’Keeffe crafted for herself. With photographs by luminaries like Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, and Annie Leibovitz, the show reflects O’Keeffe’s radical rethinking of female identity, and the artist’s commitment to elements of modernism—minimalism, seriality, simplification—not only in her art, but also in her distinctive style of dress. (NYCity Guide)

(now-9/6/17) The newest show at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim, provides a rare chance to explore in-depth some of the key artists of this essential New York institution. Framed by the interests of six leading patrons, Visionaries brings together canvases from masters like Max Ernst, René Magritte, and Yves Tanguy, and sculptures by Joseph Cornell and Alberto Giacometti. In addition, Jackson Pollock’s Alchemy (1947) is being shown in the U.S. for the first time in nearly 50 years. More than a dozen works on paper by Picasso and Van Gogh, rarely on view to the public, can be seen in the Thannhauser Gallery, and paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, and Édouard Manet are displayed on the museum’s legendary ramps.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 05/24 and 05/22.
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