NYC Events,”Only the Best” (06/07) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Super 7  NYC Events > WEDNESDAY/JUNE 07, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-June”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

The Science of First Impressions | Alexander Todorov + Ellen Burstyn
Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W. 17th St./ 7PM, $25
“We make up our minds about others after seeing their faces for a fraction of a second—and these snap judgments predict all kinds of important decisions. For example, politicians who simply look “more competent” are more likely to win elections by larger margins. Yet the character judgments we make from faces are as inaccurate as they are irresistible; in most situations, we would guess more accurately if we ignored faces. So why do we put so much stock in these impressions?

Together with award-winning actress Ellen Burstyn, Alexander Todorov—one of the world’s leading researchers on the subject—answers this question as he tells the story of the modern science of first impressions.”

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6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>>The Atheist Gospel Trombone Choir
>>John Moreland
>>Nicki Parrott
>>Hiromi & Edmar Castaneda Duet
>>Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway
>>Split Screens Festival
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

The Atheist Gospel Trombone Choir
Joe’s Pub / 9;30PM, $15
“Modeled on United House of Prayer for All People “shout” choirs like Harlem’s mighty McCullough Sons of Thunder Brass Band, the Atheist Gospel Trombone Choir delivers loud, passionate horn music in service of bandleader Jacob Garchik’s contrarian theology. The Brooklyn composer and multi-instrumentalist’s group — consisting of six trombones, a baritone horn, a sousaphone, and drums — will perform his 2013 solo release, The Heavens. The setlist should include that album’s “Dialogue With My Great-Grandfather” and “The Problem of Suffering,” along with new arrangements of gospel vocal-group classics like the Famous Blue Jays’ “I’m Bound for Canaan Land,” from 1947, and the Mississippi Nightingales’ 1971 track “Don’t Let Him Ride.” While Garchik’s jazz-oriented crew tend to lend more swing to these foot-stompers, you’ll still hear the United House of Prayer’s Psalm 150–inspired mandate to “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord” roiling amid the syncopation.” (Richard Gehr, VillageVoice)

Elsewhere, but this one looks worth the detour:
John Moreland
BoweryBallroom, 9 Delancey St./ 9PM, $15
“With a voice that merges Springsteen with Steve Earle and a lyrical approach heavy on stinging one-liners, John Moreland has emerged over the last several years as one of the most emotionally commanding singer-songwriters in the country. The Oklahoma native’s past few albums, beginning with 2013’s In the Throes, are quiet gems that explore the contours of romantic ruin and existential upheaval. On his new Big Bad Luv, Moreland expands not only his sonic template but also his emotional range, adding peace and levity to his typical diet of pain and remorse. After frequenting venues like Hill Country and Rockwood Music Hall in recent years, Moreland heads to the Bowery Ballroom for his largest headlining New York show to date. Performing on an acoustic double bill, Moreland will play a selection from his latest records, focusing on highlights like “Lies I Chose to Believe” and “Latchkey Kid.” (Jonathan Bernstein-VillageVoice)

Nicki Parrott (also Thur)
Birdland, 315 W. 44th St./ 8;30PM, +11PM, $40
“Parrott, a formidable mainstream bassist and singer of considerable charm, has discovered a sweet spot in the repertoire of the late vocal legend Blossom Dearie, as revealed on her enchanting new album, “Dear Blossom.” Her effervescent trio includes the neo-swing guitarist Frank Vignola.” (NewYorker)

BLUE NOTE JAZZ FESTIVAL PRESENTS:
Hiromi & Edmar Castaneda Duet (June 06-11)
Blue Note , / 8:00PM, +10:30PM, $30-$45
“Japan has produced an impressive assemblage of jazz pianists; from Toshiko Akiyoshi and Makoto Ozone to Junko Onishi. And now, well into the change of the 21st century, the pianist/composer Hiromi Uehara is the latest in that line of amazing musicians. Ever since the 2003 release of her debut Telarc CD Another Mind, Hiromi has electrified audiences and critics east and west, with a creative energy that encompasses and eclipses the boundaries of jazz, classical and pop parameters; taking improvisation and composition to new heights of complexity and sophistication. Her new CD, Alive, her ninth as a leader, features her critically-acclaimed Trio Project, consisting of contrabass guitarist Anthony Jackson (Steely Dan, Paul Simon, Michel Camilo, The OJays, and Chick Corea) and drummer Simon Phillips (Toto, The Who, Judas Priest, David Gilmour, and Jack Bruce).

“Hiromi is one of the most remarkable pianists of the past half century.” All Music

Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway (June 06-10)
Feinstein’s/54 Below / 7PM, $45-$65
“The vocally superb Brazilian baritone Paulo Szot, who made Broadway audiences swoon as Emile De Becque in the 2008 revival of South Pacific, returns to Feinstein’s/54 with a new batch of favorites from musical-theater history.” (TONY)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Split Screens Festival  (June 02-08)
at IFC Center
“This theater, home to the country’s largest documentary film festival, Doc NYC, is now bingeing on the fictional marvels of television. Programmed by the film and TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, this festival, which will continue through Thursday, is divided into premieres, including HBO’s “The Deuce”; showcases, including a panel on Amazon’s “The Man in the High Castle”; close-ups — as the festival is calling its onstage interviews — with Margo Martindale and Rami Malek; and a rewind of the nightmarish finale of NBC’s “Hannibal.” (KATHRYN SHATTUCK-NYT)

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and don’t forget this continuing event, an eclectic extravaganza that is an annual highlight for the very Upper WestSide of Manhattan:

2017 Uptown Arts Stroll
“The 2017 Uptown Arts Stroll is kicking off with a bang. Since 2003, this annual showcase has offered a variety of arts and cultural events in Washington Heights, Inwood and West Harlem; in addition to performances, it’s presenting art exhibitions, literary events and open studios.” (untappedcities)

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 Whitney Museum of American Art:

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL (through June 11).
“This is arguably the best Biennial in years, and perhaps the best ever in its combination of demographics, aesthetics and political urgency. Nearly half of the featured artists are female, and half nonwhite. Their works reach from figure painting to virtual reality. Income inequality, racism, misogyny, immigration and violence are confronted in ways that set a high standard for social engagement sustained by formal ambition.” (Smith-NYT) 212-570-3600, whitney.org

Museum of Arts and Design (thru Aug 20)
2 Columbus Circle
Counter-Couture: Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture
“In all its sumptuous, ragtag, iconoclastic, and utopian forms, hippie clothing reflected the seismic cultural shifts of Vietnam War-era America, eschewing the mass-produced in favor of the personalized and the handmade. This captivating exhibition, installed in moodily lit galleries against purple-and-gold wallpaper, goes beyond the expected caftans and macramé to detail the nuances and extremes of countercultural aesthetics. A section devoted to stage costumes includes a medieval-inspired muumuu, its pastel-ombré velvet adorned with a starburst appliqué; Mama Cass Elliot, of the Mamas & the Papas, wore it in 1967. Nearby, looping film footage includes performance documentation of the Cockettes, an anarchic theatre group whose psychedelic, thrift-store drag sensibility helped shape a nascent queer aesthetic. From the Army-surplus garments appropriated and painstakingly embroidered by flower children to the dashikis and African fabrics embraced by the black-pride movement to the ascetic styles of communes and cults, the exhibition emphasizes how vernacular fashion signalled antiestablishment values and group identity. That said, high fashion isn’t neglected. One highlight is the visionary designer Kaisik Wong’s glittering, futuristic “wearable art,” which resembles armor and cocoons from another planet—or the next Aquarian age.” (NewYorker)

Museum of Modern Art:

‘ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG: AMONG FRIENDS’ (thru Sept.17)

“This retrospective of one of America’s great artists includes more than 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, sound and video recordings, prints and photographs created over the course of a six­decade career. Rauschenberg sometimes worked with artists, dancers, musicians and writers (including John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Yvonne Rainer and Jasper Johns), and the exhibition will be supplemented by dance and performance.” ( STAV ZIV-Newsday)

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

 The Museum of the City of New York:

NY at Its Core (ongoing)
“Ten years in the making, New York at Its Core tells the compelling story of New York’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” The exhibition captures the human energy that drove New York to become a city like no other and a subject of fascination the world over. Entertaining, inspiring, important, and at times bemusing, New York City “big personalities,” including Alexander Hamilton, Walt Whitman, Boss Tweed, Emma Goldman, JP Morgan, Fiorello La Guardia, Jane Jacobs, Jay-Z, and dozens more, parade through the exhibition. Visitors will also learn the stories of lesser-known New York personalities, like Lenape chieftain Penhawitz and Italian immigrant Susie Rocco. Even animals like the horse, the pig, the beaver, and the oyster, which played pivotal roles in the economy and daily life of New York, get their moment in the historical spotlight. Occupying the entire first floor in three interactive galleries (Port City, 1609-1898, World City, 1898-2012, and Future City Lab) New York at Its Core is shaped by four themes: money, density, diversity, and creativity. Together, they provide a lens for examining the character of the city, and underlie the modern global metropolis we know today. mcny.org” (NYCity Guide)

American Museum of Natural History:

Mummies (thru 1/7/18)
“For thousands of years, peoples around the world practiced mummification as a way of preserving and honoring their dead. Mummies brings you face to face with some of these ancient individuals and reveals how scientists are using modern technology to glean stunning details about them and their cultures. In Mummies, ancient remains from the Nile Valley of Africa and the Andes Mountains of South America will be on view, allowing visitors to connect with cultures from the distant past. Mummification, a more widespread practice than most think, was used not only for royal Egyptians but also for common people and even animals. Interactive touch tables let visitors virtually “unravel” or see inside mummies as they delve deep into the unique stories of the people or animals who lie within. Other parts of the exhibition showcase the latest isotopic and DNA testing being performed on mummies, and explain how these sophisticated analytical techniques are helping scientists discover important clues about long-vanished practices. Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.”(NYCity Guide)

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PLUS, These wonderful museum exhibitions elsewhere, continue through this period:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: LIVING MODERN’ at the Brooklyn Museum (through July 23). Given that most artists are to some extent dandies, it would be wrong to view this fascinating show through an exclusively feminist lens. But it does demonstrate the powerful, carefully cultivated aesthetic and inborn independence that connects the art, wardrobe, living spaces and public persona of America’s first celebrity artist. In and around her art, she redefined gender and style. (Roberta Smith-NYT)
>and another view of this exhibition–Georgia O’Keeffe: “Living Modern” provides a new look at an iconic American artist at the very institution that hosted her first solo museum exhibition in 1927—the Brooklyn Museum. Presenting O’Keeffe’s remarkable wardrobe in dialogue with iconic paintings and photographs, this singular exhibition focuses in on the modernist persona O’Keeffe crafted for herself. With photographs by luminaries like Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, and Annie Leibovitz, the show reflects O’Keeffe’s radical rethinking of female identity, and the artist’s commitment to elements of modernism—minimalism, seriality, simplification—not only in her art, but also in her distinctive style of dress. (NYCity Guide)

(now-9/6/17) The newest show at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim, provides a rare chance to explore in-depth some of the key artists of this essential New York institution. Framed by the interests of six leading patrons, Visionaries brings together canvases from masters like Max Ernst, René Magritte, and Yves Tanguy, and sculptures by Joseph Cornell and Alberto Giacometti. In addition, Jackson Pollock’s Alchemy (1947) is being shown in the U.S. for the first time in nearly 50 years. More than a dozen works on paper by Picasso and Van Gogh, rarely on view to the public, can be seen in the Thannhauser Gallery, and paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, and Édouard Manet are displayed on the museum’s legendary ramps.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 06/05 and 06/03.
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