NYC Events,”Only the Best” (07/07) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

Today’s Elite 8  NYC Events > FRIDAY/JULY 07, 2017

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.
For future NYC Events be sure to check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-July”

Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Christine Andreas: Piaf—No Regrets
54 Below, 254 W54th St./ 7PM, $50
“Broadway leading lady Andreas could coast on her pure, silvery soprano, but she is also a strong storyteller who knows how to dip beneath the pretty surfaces. In her new show, she pays homage to great French songbird Edith Piaf, putting her own stamp on such classic chansons as “La Vie en Rose,” “Hymne à L’Amour,” “Milord” and “Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien.”” (TONY)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>>JOE BATAAN
>>ABT Tchaikovsky Spectacular
>>(Sandy) Alex G
>>HOUSTON PERSON QUARTET
>>The Django Reinhardt NY Festival All Stars
>>Why Picasso, Calder, and Other Contemporary Artists Found a Home in the Theater
>>“First Fridays”

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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

JOE BATAAN
at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing
Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center,/ dance lesson 6:30PM, music 7:30PM, $17+
“Mr. Bataan was a kind of Bruno Mars of his day (the 1960s and ’70s); a self-taught vocalist and pianist, he pulled together the most hummable elements of soul, salsa and doo-wop, balancing a raffish bad-boy appeal with a stubbornly endearing sweetness. He appears here at Damrosch Park in Midtown as part of Lincoln Center’s outdoor summer concert series. Between sets, DJ Turmix will spin some tunes from the boogaloo movement that Mr. Bataan helped define.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

ABT Tchaikovsky Spectacular (July 03-08)
American Ballet Theatre The Metropolitan Opera House/ 7:30PM, $22+
“No other composer in history has written more beloved music for the ballet than Pyotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky. ABT presents a sparkling showcase of breathtaking athleticism and lyrical beauty in these works inspired by the composer’s genius:

Souvenir d’un lieu cher | Alexei Ratmansky (Company Premiere) Mozartiana | George Balanchine AfterEffect | Marcelo Gomes Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux | George Balanchine The Nutcracker pas de deux | Alexei Ratmansky Aurora’s Wedding from Ratmansky’s The Sleeping Beauty, including Bronislava Nijinska’s dances of The Three Ivans and Porcelain Trio”

(Sandy) Alex G
BOWERY BALLROOM, 8:30PM, $16–$20
“Alex Giannascoli has been recording and performing his blend of lo-fi indie rock ever since he was a college student in Philadelphia. First as Alex G, and now as (Sandy) Alex G, Giannascoli has amassed an extensive discography for a 25-year-old, having released a handful of Bandcamp albums before signing with Domino Records in 2015. His latest album, Rocket, is his most accomplished, merging rootsy folk, experimental electronic, and psychedelic piano-pop on highlights like “Sportstar” and “Proud.” Although his albums are predominantly solo affairs, with Giannascoli producing, recording, and playing most instruments, the songwriter tours as part of a tight-knit quartet that delivers a high-energy rock show. He’ll next bring his foursome to New York City for two sold-out shows at Music Hall of Williamsburg and Bowery Ballroom. Show up early to both of this week’s sets to catch upstart side-projects Japanese Breakfast and Cende on a three-bill Philly-centric indie rock showcase.” (Jonathan Bernstein,VillageVoice)

HOUSTON PERSON QUARTET (July 6-9)
Jazz Standard, / 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $30
“Houston Person and Jazz Standard go way back: It was in May 2002 that he made his first appearance as a leader on our stage. The great tenor saxophonist has put fifteen more years under his belt since then but “his playing just goes on getting better,” declared Dave Gelly in The Observer. In his review of a January 2012 engagement at Ronnie Scott’s in London, The Guardian’s John Fordham wrote: “Like Sonny Rollins and a handful of other survivors, Person is an eloquent messenger from a jazz era rooted in traditional blues, black church music, Broadway love songs and the impersonation, by sax, of a singer’s tone palette…His sound has become uniquely characterful: an idiosyncratic edit of all he has learned, expressed in shrugging hoots, briefly cantering bop sprints, spacious and softly blown ballads.”

The Django Reinhardt NY Festival All Stars
Birdland, 315 W. 44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $50
“This annual celebration of the music and influence of the unparalleled Belgian Gypsy guitarist features such acolytes as the guitarist Samson Schmitt. Guest soloists include the saxophonist Grace Kelly and the vocalists Veronica Swift and Jazzmeia Horn.” (NewYorker)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Why Picasso, Calder, and Other Contemporary Artists Found a Home in the Theater
The Strand, 828 Broadway / 7PM, $20
“More than just stars on the art scene, Picasso and Calder took center stage in the world of theater. In 1917 Picasso fell in love with a ballerina in the Ballets Russes while creating scenery and costumes for his collaboration with Satie on the pathbreaking dance work, Parade. His stage designs changed the course of his painting. Alexander Calder, who has a major show at the Whitney this summer, created his famous Circus as well as the set for Satie’s opera Socrate and many other theater works.

Cultural historian Charles A. Riley II, author of Free as Gods, will share the backstage secrets of Picasso, Calder, Leger, Chagall, Hockney, Kentridge, and many other contemporary artists who have found a home in the theater.”

“First Fridays”
The Frick Collection, 1 E. 70th St./ 6PM, FREE
“Museum admission and gallery programs are free the first Friday evening of the month (except September and January). Enjoy gallery talks, music performances, and sketching, or simply find yourself in the company of the Old Masters and art enthusiasts from around the world.”

Let’s not forget this marvelous continuing event from The Film Society Lincoln Center :

New York Asian Film Festival (thru July 16)

“Catch more than 50 new films, including blockbusters, art films and beautiful historical dramas, plus appearances from more than 20 international filmmakers at this 17-day festival. This year’s stellar lineup, which features films hailing from Hong Kong, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, China and Southeast Asia, features films like Chinese romance Soul Mate on July 7, fantastical Japanese drama Vanishing Time: a Boy Who Returned on July 13, and wraps with the U.S. premiere of Jung Byung-gil’s acclaimed assassin film, The Villainess, on July 16.” (TONY)

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village:
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Whitney Museum of American Art:

Calder: Hypermobility (thru Oct 23)
“focuses on the extraordinary breadth of movement and sound in the work of Alexander Calder. This exhibition brings together a rich constellation of key sculptures and provides a rare opportunity to experience the works as the artist intended—in motion. Regular activations will occur in the galleries, revealing the inherent kinetic nature of Calder’s work, as well as its relationship to performance. Influenced in part by the artist’s fascination and engagement with choreography, Calder’s sculptures contain an embedded performativity that is reflected in their idiosyncratic motions and the perceptual responses they provoke.”

Museum of Arts and Design (thru Aug 20)
2 Columbus Circle
Counter-Couture: Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture
“In all its sumptuous, ragtag, iconoclastic, and utopian forms, hippie clothing reflected the seismic cultural shifts of Vietnam War-era America, eschewing the mass-produced in favor of the personalized and the handmade. This captivating exhibition, installed in moodily lit galleries against purple-and-gold wallpaper, goes beyond the expected caftans and macramé to detail the nuances and extremes of countercultural aesthetics. A section devoted to stage costumes includes a medieval-inspired muumuu, its pastel-ombré velvet adorned with a starburst appliqué; Mama Cass Elliot, of the Mamas & the Papas, wore it in 1967. Nearby, looping film footage includes performance documentation of the Cockettes, an anarchic theatre group whose psychedelic, thrift-store drag sensibility helped shape a nascent queer aesthetic. From the Army-surplus garments appropriated and painstakingly embroidered by flower children to the dashikis and African fabrics embraced by the black-pride movement to the ascetic styles of communes and cults, the exhibition emphasizes how vernacular fashion signalled antiestablishment values and group identity. That said, high fashion isn’t neglected. One highlight is the visionary designer Kaisik Wong’s glittering, futuristic “wearable art,” which resembles armor and cocoons from another planet—or the next Aquarian age.” (NewYorker)

Museum of Modern Art:

‘ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG: AMONG FRIENDS’ (thru Sept.17)

“This retrospective of one of America’s great artists includes more than 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, sound and video recordings, prints and photographs created over the course of a six­decade career. Rauschenberg sometimes worked with artists, dancers, musicians and writers (including John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Yvonne Rainer and Jasper Johns), and the exhibition will be supplemented by dance and performance.” ( STAV ZIV-Newsday)

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

American Museum of Natural History:

Mummies (thru 1/7/18)
“For thousands of years, peoples around the world practiced mummification as a way of preserving and honoring their dead. Mummies brings you face to face with some of these ancient individuals and reveals how scientists are using modern technology to glean stunning details about them and their cultures. In Mummies, ancient remains from the Nile Valley of Africa and the Andes Mountains of South America will be on view, allowing visitors to connect with cultures from the distant past. Mummification, a more widespread practice than most think, was used not only for royal Egyptians but also for common people and even animals. Interactive touch tables let visitors virtually “unravel” or see inside mummies as they delve deep into the unique stories of the people or animals who lie within. Other parts of the exhibition showcase the latest isotopic and DNA testing being performed on mummies, and explain how these sophisticated analytical techniques are helping scientists discover important clues about long-vanished practices. Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.”(NYCity Guide)

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PLUS, These wonderful museum exhibitions elsewhere, continue through this period:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: LIVING MODERN’ at the Brooklyn Museum (through July 23). Given that most artists are to some extent dandies, it would be wrong to view this fascinating show through an exclusively feminist lens. But it does demonstrate the powerful, carefully cultivated aesthetic and inborn independence that connects the art, wardrobe, living spaces and public persona of America’s first celebrity artist. In and around her art, she redefined gender and style. (Roberta Smith-NYT)
>and another view of this exhibition–Georgia O’Keeffe: “Living Modern” provides a new look at an iconic American artist at the very institution that hosted her first solo museum exhibition in 1927—the Brooklyn Museum. Presenting O’Keeffe’s remarkable wardrobe in dialogue with iconic paintings and photographs, this singular exhibition focuses in on the modernist persona O’Keeffe crafted for herself. With photographs by luminaries like Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, and Annie Leibovitz, the show reflects O’Keeffe’s radical rethinking of female identity, and the artist’s commitment to elements of modernism—minimalism, seriality, simplification—not only in her art, but also in her distinctive style of dress. (NYCity Guide)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 07/05 and 07/03.
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