NYC Events,”Only the Best” (10/29) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events better check the tab above: “Notable NYC Events-OCTOBER”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

‘THE RED SHOES’
at New York City Center (Oct. 26 through Nov. 5 at various times).
“Matthew Bourne/New Adventures returns to New York City Center with his first new production in four years. An adaptation of the treasured Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger film, “The Red Shoes” explores Victoria Page’s battle between life and art. The New Adventures dancers Ashley Shaw and Cordelia Braithwaite perform the part, along with Sara Mearns, a principal of New York City Ballet. The composer Julian Craster is played, alternately, by Marcelo Gomes of American Ballet Theater and Dominic North of New Adventures. And finally, Sam Archer plays the impresario Boris Lermontov.” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Terell Stafford Quintet
>> ‘LAYLA AND MAJNUN’
>> Johnny O’Neal
>> AMERICAN BALLET THEATER
>> The Poetry Brothel’s Tenth Annual Masquerade Ball
>> A History of Ghost Hunting
>> IFPDA Print Fair
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Terell Stafford Quintet (LAST DAY)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St. / 8:30PM, +10:30PM, $30
“Hearing Stafford’s work as a whirlwind trumpeter in decades past, with the bands of Bobby Watson and others, you could practically taste his promise. True to predictions, Stafford has developed into a distinguished bandleader and composer whose horn playing still startles with its verve and conviction. His quintet is bolstered by the pianist Bruce Barth and the saxophonist Tim Warfield.” (NewYorker)

‘LAYLA AND MAJNUN’
at the Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center/ 3PM, $
“As part of the White Light Festival, the choreographer Mark Morris presents “Layla and Majnun,” an acclaimed production spotlighting a pair of star-crossed lovers central to Persian and Arabian folklore that predates “Romeo and Juliet.” For it, the Mark Morris Dance Group is joined by the Silk Road Ensemble, and the sumptuous sets and costumes are by the British painter and printmaker Howard Hodgkin.” (NYT-GIA KOURLAS)

Johnny O’Neal (LAST DAY)
Smoke, 2751 Broadway, between 105th and 106th Sts./ 7, 9, 10:30PM, $38
“O’Neal is a survivor, and he’d be the first person to tell you so. Obscurity and illness diverted his path for a good part of the past few decades, but this fine pianist and singer is a throwback to the long-gone days when performers had to know any song that was thrown at them, and then toss it off with authority. He has built a coterie of devoted listeners entranced by his old-school erudition. O’Neal celebrates the release of his album “In the Moment” in charge of an agreeably empathic trio.” (NewYorker)

AMERICAN BALLET THEATER (LAST DAY)
at the NYS / DHK Theater, Lincoln Center / 2PM, +8PM, $40+
“The company continues its fall season with performances of Alexei Ratmansky’s latest ballet, “Songs of Bukovina,” set to a new score by Leonid Desyatnikov, and a pair of premieres by Benjamin Millepied. Along with “I Feel the Earth Move,” which will be unveiled on Oct. 25, Mr. Millepied also contributes “Counterpoint for Philip Johnson,” a work created in homage to the architect and performed during select intermissions. Other programs include understated beauties: Frederick Ashton’s “Symphonic Variations” (1946) and Jerome Robbins’s “Other Dances” (1976), originally created for Natalia Makarova and Mikhail Baryshnikov.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures, Discussions, Book Talks, Literary Readings, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Elsewhere, but these two look like a fun way to celebrate Halloween, worth the detour:

The Poetry Brothel’s Tenth Annual Masquerade Ball
House of Yes / 8pm; $40­–$75
“It’s a little like Eyes Wide Shut meets Dead Poets Society; the Brothel’s infamous, annual Halloween party heightens its already-sensual shows into a fully rapturous experience. For this year’s edition, hosts Mister Charley, the Madame and Tennessee Pink welcome guest poet Steph Burt, burlesque sirens Mademoiselle Estelle and Puss N Boots, aerialists the Lost Boys, sketch artist Too Loose and palm reader and jewelry maker Holy Crow. Music comes by way of Sarian and house band the Hot Club of Flatbush. Be sure to bring a little extra pocket money for a private reading from one of the events many roaming poets. Iambic pentameter never sounded so sexy.” (TONY)

A History of Ghost Hunting
Q.E.D., 27-16 23rd Ave., btw. 27th & 28th Sts., Astoria, Queens / 3PM, $10
“Ghost hunting has been part of our fictional and historic narratives since the Ancient Greeks. This lecture will take you on a historical paranormal investigation starting with Homer’s The Odyssey to the Middle Ages to 19th century spiritualism to present day ghost hunting techniques. The second half of the lecture will involve an interview/discussion with paranormal investigator, Vinny Carbone, who currently conducts paranormal investigations at the historic Morris-Jumel Mansion and throughout the U.S. and then we’ll open up the floor for questions.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

IFPDA Print Fair (LAST DAY)
Javits Center River Pavilion, 655 West 34th St./ 12-8PM, $20
This week the Javits Center will be filled with prints spanning a wide range of artistic periods, from Dürer to Tacita Dean (with an emphasis on contemporary and modern works), all part of the International Fine Print Dealers Association’s yearly fair, now in its twenty-sixth edition.

View and purchase a diverse collection of rare works that span a range of periods and prices at the largest and most celebrated art fair dedicated to the artistic medium of printmaking.

Continuing Events

Archtober  (Oct.01-31)
31 days, 100+ ways to celebrate design in NYC! The seventh-annual, month-long festival of architecture activities, programs, and exhibitions in New York City will take place October 1-31, 2017.  Archtober’s calendar features 200 architecture and design lectures, conferences, programs, and exhibitions at more than 70+ collaborating institutions across the city.

For more details go to my Tab in the Header: “Notable Events October”  and scroll all the long way to the bottom. This event makes America, or at least NYCity, great again.

TASTING CIDER WEEK (LAST DAY)
“If cider is the apple of your eye, then Cider Week is for you. Hop around town for tastings, celebrate the opening of the Bad Seed Cider Brooklyn Taproom and check out the Cider in the Square Apple Market to find hard and sweet ciders, apples, pie and donuts. Festivities also include cider­centric feasts, talks and extended happy hours.” (Newsday)
WHEN | WHERE Friday through Sunday, , Oct. 20­29 at various venues, including the Bad Seed Brooklyn Tap Room, 585 Franklin Ave.,
INFO Free -­$85, ciderweeknyc.com

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village:
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

 

Grey Art Gallery 

PARTNERS IN DESIGN: ALFRED H. BARR JR. AND PHILIP JOHNSON (through Dec. 9).

“Five minutes on StreetEasy, browsing through seven-figure “contemporary” condos whose furniture was designed a century ago, should offer all the proof necessary that Modernism will never die. This intriguing if incomplete exhibition reveals how two young, Bauhaus-mad men of MoMA — Barr, the museum’s first director, and Johnson, its first architecture curator — imported European design to the United States, and showcased it not only in their new museum but also in their own apartments. Johnson had family money, and hired Mies van der Rohe to kit out his apartment with a rosewood chest, a spare tea table, and a camel-colored Barcelona chair; Barr, who had to work for a living, ordered entirely passable knockoffs from Ypsilanti, Mich. This show is too small for its subject, but if you’re into Modernist revivals, you’ll do better here than at the ghastly new restaurant in Johnson’s old Four Seasons.” (Jason Farago)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

‘BLACK POWER!’  (through Dec. 30).
“Given the economic, environmental and social policies emanating from the White House, the United States could be headed for its most dynamic era of public resistance since the 1960s. And if you’re searching for cultural models from the past, even flawed ones, that effectively brought a message of social change into the street, the schools and the workplace, you’ll do well to check out this vivid documentary show about a cultural movement that broadened activist art to embrace public murals, fashion and poetry; and protest demonstrations that had the visual allure, choreographic rigor and emotional weight of theater.” (Cotter)

American Museum of Natural History:

Mummies (thru 1/7/18)
“For thousands of years, peoples around the world practiced mummification as a way of preserving and honoring their dead. Mummies brings you face to face with some of these ancient individuals and reveals how scientists are using modern technology to glean stunning details about them and their cultures. In Mummies, ancient remains from the Nile Valley of Africa and the Andes Mountains of South America will be on view, allowing visitors to connect with cultures from the distant past. Mummification, a more widespread practice than most think, was used not only for royal Egyptians but also for common people and even animals. Interactive touch tables let visitors virtually “unravel” or see inside mummies as they delve deep into the unique stories of the people or animals who lie within. Other parts of the exhibition showcase the latest isotopic and DNA testing being performed on mummies, and explain how these sophisticated analytical techniques are helping scientists discover important clues about long-vanished practices. Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.”(NYCity Guide)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 10/27 and 10/25.
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