NYC Events,”Only the Best” (11/011) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above:NYC Events-November”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

MusicFuture
Zankel Hall / 7:30PM, $59+
“The Japanese composer Joe Hisaishi’s impressive record in writing music for the movies—specifically, the long string of delightful scores he created for Hayao Miyazaki’s marvellous Studio Ghibli animated features—has earned him comparisons to John Williams. Hisaishi recently sold out two Carnegie Hall concerts of his cinematic fare, but, on Sunday, at Zankel Hall, as part of a series he started to promote contemporary classical music, he joins forces with David Lang, the Bang on a Can co-founder and a Pulitzer Prize winner. The program includes pieces by both composers, along with Hisaishi’s arrangement of “Two Pages,” by Philip Glass; among the performers are the cellist Maya Beiser and the Mivos Quartet.” (Steve Smith, NewYorker)

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6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Hungarian State Opera and Ballet
>> Kamasi Washington
>> The Bad Plus
>> Django Reinhardt Festival
>>  Veterans Day Parade
>> New York Cider Week 2018
Continuing Events
>> Canstruction
>> White Light Festival
>> Harry Potter: A History of Magic
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Hungarian State Opera and Ballet (LAST performance)
NYS Theater, Lincoln Center/ 2PM, $10+
“The Hungarian State Opera of Budapest makes its Lincoln Center debut with a rich variety of ballet and opera productions to choose from. It will present Hungarian iconic historical opera pieces: Erkel’s Bánk bán (The Viceroy Bank), Goldmark’s The Queen of Sheba, world-famous 20th century one-act operas Vajda’s Mario and the Magician and Bartók Bluebeard’s Castle, but also beloved classical ballets: Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, and Petipa and Minkus’ Don Quixote. Those who prefer more modern ballet pieces can also see Hans van Manen’s 2017 triple bill LOL

Elsewhere, but this dude is always worth the detour:

Kamasi Washington
at Brooklyn Steel, 319 Frost St./ 7PM, $40, looks like a tough ticket – head to the secondary market.
“Jazz saxophonist Kamasi Washington brings his “Heaven and Earth” project, which includes his recent single “Hub-Tones,” a tribute to the great Freddie Hubbard — to life on the current tour, though his improvisation skills make every show different from the last.” (amny.com)

Django Reinhardt Festival (LAST DAY)
Birdland, 315 W. 44th St./ 8:30PM, +11PM, $50
“The spell of a Belgian Gypsy guitarist­ with a damaged fretting hand, who made a single, brief visit to America in late 1946, seven years before he died, still retains its power. Paying homage to the passionate virtuoso at this annual festival will be members of the Schmitt family, including the guitarists Dorado and his sons Samson and Amati, along with such Stateside guests as Grace Kelly, Edmar Castañeda, and Joel Frahm.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

The Bad Plus (LAST DAY)
Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Ave. S., at 11th St./ 8:30PM, +10:30PM, $35
“Any worries that the addition of a new pianist might have dulled the intensity or the imagination of the Bad Plus have been assuaged. With Orrin Evans at the keyboard, and Reid Anderson and Dave King holding steady on the bass and the drums, the freshly minted outfit has retained all the expressionistic power and improvisational daring that first made the band a sensation, more than twenty years ago.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Veterans Day Parade
Midtown East – Fifth Avenue
“More than 25,000 people, 30 floats, and 150 vehicles will parade up Fifth Avenue from 26th to 45th Street to thank veterans and current military for their service. This year’s edition commemorates the end of World War I 100 years ago. A 10 a.m. opening ceremony ends with a wreath laying at the Eternal Light Monument. Pay your respects and see vintage military vehicles and marching bands from across the country.”
Cost: Free; opening ceremony has limited seating with priority to elderly and disabled veterans.” (thrillist.com)

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:

New York Cider Week 2018
Taste all the ciders
Brooklyn Cider House / 11 AM-4PM, $
“New York Cider Week 2018 wraps this Sunday with a Hard Cider Festival and Market at Brooklyn Cider House. Our favorite place to drink — and just as importantly, catch! — cider in the city is hosting free tastings of over 60 varieties, or come for a five-course dinner with cidermakers that night with paired tastings ($125). Nov. 11, tastings 11 a.m.-4 p.m., dinner 6-9 p.m., 1100 Flushing Ave., Bushwick, brooklynciderhouse.com”

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Continuing Events

Canstruction (Nov.02-15)
Brookfield Place | Battery Park City / 10AM-8PM, FREE
“This annual cans-for-a-cause competition pits architecture teams against each other to create larger-than-life Pop Art–installations using more than 120,000 cans of nonperishable food, all in the name of ending hunger (every can is donated to City Harvest). Head down to Brookfield Place to see the unveiling of these engineering spectacles, all built overnight after months of planning, and check back to see if your favorite takes home any titles in judges’ categories like Best Use of Labels, Best Meal and Structural Ingenuity. Admission is free, but do your part by bringing the suggested donation of one canned good per person.” (TONY)

White Light Festival (through Nov.18)
“Lincoln Center’s annual White Light Festival, integrating performances from around the world in a cross-cultural extravaganza, will play six venues across the city.

The festival will include performances of Waiting for Godot from Ireland’s Druid Theatre Company, directed by Tony-winning director Garry Hynes—the first female to win a Tony Award for direction of a play.

Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui brings Sutra to the stage, featuring martial arts from China’s Shaolin monks. Hip-hop, contemporary dance, and aerial work combine in the presentation of Borderline by Company Wang Ramirez. The U.S. premiere of Blak Whyte Gray, a mix of hip-hop and African-inspired movement, makes its way from across the pond to the Lincoln Center stage, as well as the U.S. premiere of Kaija Saariaho’s chamber opera Only the Sound Remains, directed by Peter Sellars and starring Philippe Jaroussky and Davóne Tines.”

Harry Potter: A History of Magic (Now-1/27/19)
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park W.
“Gather round ye muggles and wizards, squibs and witches, tourists and natives: magic is on its way. Harry Potter: A History of Magic, commemorating the beloved series’s 20th anniversary, is now open at the New-York Historical Society. One of the most eagerly anticipated exhibits to hit the city since, well, ever, the show comes straight from the British Library in London, where, not surprisingly, it was the institution’s most successful exhibition.

Artifacts like crystal balls, Leonardo da Vinci notebooks, and the first written record of the magic word “abracadabra” are among the treasures on display, joined by original materials from author J.K. Rowling’s archives. Also on view to the public for the first time will be Mary GrandPré’s illustrations created for Scholastic’s original editions of the novels. Costumes and set models from Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which opened on Broadway in April, will be showcased in the exhibition. A long list of events will take place in conjunction with the exhibit, including trivia night, talks, an adult costume party, and more.” (cityguideny)
Daily, except most Mondays, $21, $6 ages 5-13, free 4 and younger

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

‘BODYS ISEK KINGELEZ: CITY DREAMS’ (through Jan. 1). “The first comprehensive survey of the Congolese artist is a euphoric exhibition as utopian wonderland featuring his fantasy architectural models and cities — works strong in color, eccentric in shape, loaded with enthralling details and futuristic aura. Mr. Kingelez (1948-2015) was convinced that the world had never seen a vision like his, and this beautifully designed show bears him out.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

Rubin Museum of Art

Chitra Ganesh: The Scorpion Gesture (Through Jan. 7)
“The Brooklyn artist’s new animations ingeniously combine her own drawings and watercolors with historical imagery, peppering the journeys of bodhisattvas with contemporary pop-culture references. Five of these pieces are installed on the museum’s second and third floors amid its collection of Himalayan art, elements of which appear in her psychedelic sequences of spinning mandalas and falling lotus flowers. (Ganesh’s works are activated, as if by magic, when viewers approach.) In “Rainbow Body,” a cave, which also appears in a nearby painting of Mandarava, is filled with people in 3-D glasses, watching as the guru-deity attains enlightenment. “Silhouette in the Graveyard” is projected behind a glass case containing a small sculpture of Maitreya, from late-eighteenth-century Mongolia, for a cleverly dioramalike effect. Prophesied to arrive during an apocalyptic crisis, the bodhisattva is seen here against Ganesh’s montage, which includes footage of global catastrophes and political protests, from the Women’s March to Black Lives Matter.” (

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Posts in right Sidebar dated 11/09 and 11/07.
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