NYC Events,”Only the Best” (01/09) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events better check the tab above: “NYC Events-January”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.
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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

LEE KONITZ (Jan. 9-10)
at Dizzy’s Club / 7:30 and 9:30PM, $40 (only$30 Wed)
“An early exponent of Lennie Tristano’s hybridized theory of improvising, Mr. Konitz cut a distinctive path on the alto saxophone in the 1940s and ’50s, when most others were tracing the footsteps of Charlie Parker. Last year Mr. Konitz celebrated his own 90th year with the release of a lovely quartet disc, “Frescalalto.” These shows at Dizzy’s — featuring the pianist Dan Tepfer and other members of Mr. Konitz’s inner circle — are a kind of belated birthday fête.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

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5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Caleb Teicher & Company / Bodytraffic
>> Tosca
>>GUNN-TRUSCINSKI DUO
>>Author Talk: Balfour Declaration’s Enduring Lessons
>> 21st Annual Shoe-Inn Warehouse Sale
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Caleb Teicher & Company / Bodytraffic (also Jan.14)
Joyce Theatre, 175 Eighth Ave., at 19th St./ 7:30PM, $41-$66
“This year’s American Dance Platform, at the Joyce Theatre, curated by Christine Tschida, opens with a youthful double bill. Caleb Teicher, one of the brightest lights in tap today, brings his fun interpretation of Bach’s Goldberg Variations and “Meet Ella,” an innovative swing dance for two men. Bodytraffic, a fresh and fashionable troupe from Los Angeles, comes with repertory made for the group by Richard Siegal and Hofesh Shechter, and also a new piece by Matthew Neenan.” (NewYorker)

Tosca (Dec 31 – May 12; next Jan.12, 8pm)
The Metropolitan Opera / 8PM, $
“Rivaling the splendor of Franco Zeffirelli’s set and costumes of the Napoleonic era, Sir David McVicar’s ravishing new production offers a splendid backdrop for two extraordinary sopranos sharing the title role of the jealous prima donna: Sonya Yoncheva and Anna Netrebko. Vittorio Grigolo and Marcelo Álvarez alternate in the role of Tosca’s revolutionary artist lover Cavaradossi, with Bryn Terfel, Michael Volle, and Željko Lučić as the depraved police chief Scarpia. Andris Nelsons conducts.”

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:

GUNN-TRUSCINSKI DUO
at Union Pool / 8PM, FREE, RSVP
“This instrumental duo’s work is based on a simple idea: The guitarist Steve Gunn plays languid, dreamy notes while the drummer John Truscinski keeps an understated beat. The two musicians have found ample inspiration in this format, releasing three albums together, most recently the well-received “Bay Head” in late 2017. At the right time and in the right settings — including, perhaps, this Brooklyn date, free with RSVP — Mr. Gunn and Mr. Truscinski’s music is transportive.” (NYT – SIMON VOZICK-LEVINSON)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Author Talk: Balfour Declaration’s Enduring Lessons
The Jewish Community Center in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave./ 7PM, $15
“Dig into the roots of the Israel-Palestine conflict at this event marking the centenary of the Balfour Declaration and featuring Elliot Jager, author of The Balfour Declaration | Sixty-Seven Words–100 years of Conflict.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

21st Annual Shoe-Inn Warehouse Sale (thru Friday)
Penn Plaza Pavilion; 9am; free admission
Let the shoe fetish commence at the 21st Annual Shoe-Inn Warehouse sale at Penn Plaza Pavilion. For five days over 10,000 pairs from designers like Stuart Weitzman, Vince, Sam Edelman, Kendall & Kylie, Frye, Eileen Fisher, Fiorentini + Baker, Aquatalia, Dolce Vita, Ash, Free People, Ugg, Sorel, Sigerson Morrison, Marc Fisher, Steve Madden, Joie, and over 100 additional brands will be on sale at this mega shoe event. So swing by and grab some shoes for as low as $20 and boots for as little as $39. All major credit cards accepted, no checks.” (TONY)

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Let there be light!
Erwin Redl’s Whiteout, a newly commissioned public art project, will light up in Madison Square Park. It consists of hundreds of transparent white spheres, each embedded with a white LED light, and suspended from a square grid of steel poles. The swaying sequence of light will be on display until April 2018.

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Venues:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. Here are my favorite Jazz clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide. Check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village:
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. South, villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com / 212-864-6662

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017.  Quality shows draw crowds.
Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just on day of performance.
NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Stephen Shore (thru May28)

“This immersive and staggeringly charming retrospective is devoted to one of the best American photographers of the past half century. Shore has peers—Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, and, especially, William Eggleston—in a generation that, in the nineteen-seventies, stormed to eminence with color film, which art photographers had long disdained. His best-known series, “American Surfaces” and “Uncommon Places,” are both from the seventies and were mostly made in rugged Western states. The pictures in these series share a quality of surprise: appearances surely unappreciated if even really noticed by anyone before—in rural Arizona, a phone booth next to a tall cactus, on which a crude sign (“GARAGE”) is mounted, and, on a small-city street in Wisconsin, a movie marquee’s neon wanly aglow, at twilight. A search for fresh astonishments has kept Shore peripatetic, on productive sojourns in Mexico, Scotland, Italy, Ukraine, and Israel. He has remained a vestigial Romantic, stopping in space and 
time to frame views that exert a peculiar tug on him. This framing is resolutely formalist: subjects composed laterally, from edge to edge, and in depth. There’s never a “background.” The most distant element is as considered as the nearest. But only when looking for it are you conscious of Shore’s formal discipline, because it is as fluent as a language learned from birth. His best pictures at once arouse feelings and leave us alone to make what we will of them. He delivers truths, whether hard or easy, with something very like mercy.” (NewYorker)

Whitney Museum

Laura Owens (thru Feb.04)

“In the mid-nineteen-nineties, Owens heralded the comeback of painting with a succession of unbelievably cool, well-timed canvases that breezily dispensed with outdated notions of style, gesture, and the mutual exclusivity of formalism and illusionistic space. And she’s made news ever since: this welcome mid-career retrospective neatly charts the hairpin turns of the Los Angeles artist’s rigorous, funny, and very influential career thus far. A mischievously austere painting, from 1997, shows a blue expanse interrupted by seagulls, nominally and stickily rendered, as if piped on with black icing. The artist undercuts our understanding of “sky,” though, by airbrushing the birds’ shadows onto her monochrome. While it’s not so hard to believe that the tricky collisions of painterly quotation from the next few years are from the same artist, by 2002, when Owens deploys decorative painting in an enchanting woodland scene, we’re in a different world; then we’re in another, with her abstractions of chewed-up grids, digital brushstrokes, and sculptural, stuccolike blobs. The through line, of course, is her passionate loyalty to the medium itself, but, as demonstrated by the exhibition’s finale—an installation of two-sided, freestanding paintings, from 2015—she’s not afraid to move off the wall; it’s anyone’s guess what comes next.” (NewYorker)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 01/07 and 01/05.
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