NYC Events,”Only the Best” (03/04) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, better check the tab above: “NYC Events-March”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

In the News with Jeff Greenfield: Maggie Haberman and Alex Burns
Kaufmann Concert Hall / 7:30PM, $35
“Can’t turn away from the news? Here’s your chance to go behind the headlines — for an unprecedented third straight year with the New York Times’ Maggie Haberman and Alex Burns.

Haberman is the prominent New York Times White House correspondent and CNN political analyst whom the New Yorker’s David Remnick calls “tireless, keen-eyed … has repeatedly added to the sum total of what we know about this President” (and who has received threats because of her reporting). Alex Burns is a first-rank political reporter with a broader national focus. They’ll discuss the Trump administration, the role of the media in politics and the freedom and future of the press.”

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6 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> STRAVINSKY & BALANCHINE,
>> MACEO PARKER
>> Charles McPherson
>> BALLET NACIONAL DE ESPAÑA
>>Entertaining Science: You Are Experienced?
>> World Politics With Ralph Buultjens | Russia: Putin’s World

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STRAVINSKY & BALANCHINE, New York City Ballet
at the NYS Theater, Lincoln Center / 3PM, $30+
“Throughout his prolific career, Balanchine’s affinity for Stravinsky’s compositions remained constant, making him one of the choreographer’s favorite collaborators. This program opens with an abstraction of a Russian fairytale set to sprightly harmonies, followed by three stunning Black & White ballets known for their striking power.”

MACEO PARKER (Feb. 27-March 4)
at the Blue Note / 8 and 10:30PM, $35-$45
“More than any saxophonist, Mr. Parker has helped define the sound of funk music. He threw splashes of grease into James Brown’s music as a prominent soloist in that band for most of the 1960s, then moved on to the subversive, psychedelic funk of Parliament and Funkadelic, George Clinton’s ensembles. Since the 1990s, Mr. Parker has been stomping across the globe with his own groups, delivering a satisfying, hip-swiveling mélange of funk and soul classics and his own repertoire.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Charles McPherson (March 1-4)
Dizzy’s Club, Broadway at 60th St./ 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $40
“Finding a saxophonist versed in the language of bebop may not provide much in the way of revelatory thrills, but witnessing an authentic master of the art, like the altoist McPherson, can still elicit a genuine spinal chill. McPherson came of age in Charles Mingus’s ensembles of the early sixties; these days, he fronts a rough-and-ready quintet with the guitarist Yotam Silberstein and the pianist Jeb Patton.” (NewYorker)

BALLET NACIONAL DE ESPAÑA
at New York City Center / 7 p.m., $
“The flamboyant Ballet Nacional de España returns to Midtown for the first time in nearly two decades to open this year’s Flamenco Festival at New York City Center. The large troupe showcases a variety of Spanish dance styles, from bolero to samplings of regional dances to, of course, flamenco. In “Suite Sevilla,” the company director Antonio Najarro also sprinkles in some ballet and contemporary dance, along with the expected fans, castanets and ruffled skirts. The festival continues the following week with Compañía Eva Yerbabuena and Ballet Flamenco Jesús Carmona.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)

Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Entertaining Science: You Are Experienced?
Cornelia Street Cafe, 29 Cornelia St./ 6PM, $10
André Fenton, NYU
Dario Acosta Teich, musician
“Look at brain science and Jimi Hendrix. The Cornelia Street Cafe hosts an “Entertaining Science” evening that mashes up Professor of Neural Science André Fenton with solo guitar virtuoso Dario Acosta Teich. The evening will include the latest science of how experiences change brains (and futures), and how diverse musical influences are creating new directions and techniques for the guitar.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

World Politics With Ralph Buultjens | Russia: Putin’s World
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave./ 5PM, $35
“It’s been almost 19 years since Vladimir Putin assumed his first Russian premiership. Along the way he’s accumulated an estimated $200 billion dollars. Has Russia had enough? International affairs expert Ralph Buultjens looks at that nation’s prospects, and the future of Russo-American relations.” (ThoughtGallery.org)

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.
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Continuing Events

This is not Manhattan’s WestSide, but it is Brooklyn’s WestSide. If you have never seen these crazy, fearless performers, they are well worth the detour:

STREB EXTREME ACTION (March 2-25 at various times)
at SLAM, 51 N 1st St, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
“Elizabeth Streb’s cavernous Brooklyn space is known as SLAM (Streb Lab for Action Mechanics), which is also a frequent move that occurs at one of her shows. For the month of March, her fearless team of action heroes, as they’re called, will navigate intimidating industrial contraptions and fling themselves from unnatural heights, seemingly defying physics with the pep of cheerleaders. The hourlong show, “S.E.A.” (“Singular Extreme Actions”), encapsulates all the thrill, humor and energizing fun that makes this company so singular.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)

Let there be light!
Erwin Redl’s Whiteout, a newly commissioned public art project, will light up in Madison Square Park. It consists of hundreds of transparent white spheres, each embedded with a white LED light, and suspended from a square grid of steel poles. The swaying sequence of light will be on display until April 2018.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Stephen Shore (thru May 28)

“This immersive and staggeringly charming retrospective is devoted to one of the best American photographers of the past half century. Shore has peers—Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, and, especially, William Eggleston—in a generation that, in the nineteen-seventies, stormed to eminence with color film, which art photographers had long disdained. His best-known series, “American Surfaces” and “Uncommon Places,” are both from the seventies and were mostly made in rugged Western states. The pictures in these series share a quality of surprise: appearances surely unappreciated if even really noticed by anyone before—in rural Arizona, a phone booth next to a tall cactus, on which a crude sign (“GARAGE”) is mounted, and, on a small-city street in Wisconsin, a movie marquee’s neon wanly aglow, at twilight. A search for fresh astonishments has kept Shore peripatetic, on productive sojourns in Mexico, Scotland, Italy, Ukraine, and Israel. He has remained a vestigial Romantic, stopping in space and 
time to frame views that exert a peculiar tug on him. This framing is resolutely formalist: subjects composed laterally, from edge to edge, and in depth. There’s never a “background.” The most distant element is as considered as the nearest. But only when looking for it are you conscious of Shore’s formal discipline, because it is as fluent as a language learned from birth. His best pictures at once arouse feelings and leave us alone to make what we will of them. He delivers truths, whether hard or easy, with something very like mercy.” (NewYorker)

Tarsila do Amaral (thru June 3)

Introducing New York to the First Brazilian Modernist
“Forty-five years after Tarsila do Amaral’s death, MOMA presents her first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S. Some artists are so iconic, they’re known by only one name: Brancusi, Léger, Tarsila. Wait, who? The painter Tarsila do Amaral is so famous in her native Brazil that forty-three years after her death she helped close out the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, when a projected pattern of red-orange-yellow arcs graced the stadium floor, an homage to her 1929 painting “Setting Sun.” That chimerical landscape—stylized sunset above tubular cacti and a herd of capybaras that shape-shift into boulders—hangs now at MOMA, in the artist’s first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S., “Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil.” (NewYorker)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 03/02 and 02/28.
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