NYC Events,”Only the Best” (03/16) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

Back in business after some technical difficulties.

For future NYC Events, better check the tab above: “NYC Events-March”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

¡VAYA! 63: Eddie Palmieri
Opening set by DJ Bongohead
Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, FREE, better get there early for this one.
¡VAYA! 63
One of the most acclaimed pianists of the past 60 years and New York salsa and Latin jazz icon, the nine-time Grammy winner Eddie Palmieri presides over a not-to-be-missed edition of our popular Latin dance party series.

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5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>>Madama Butterfly
>> (Un)Silent Film Night: Improv Edition!
>>Paquito D’Rivera
>>Maxine Linehan: One—The Songs of U2
>> The History of Tech & The Future of Sex
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Continuing Events
>>STREB EXTREME ACTION
>>Whiteout
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Madama Butterfly (LAST PERFORMANCE)
Metropolitan Opera House / 8PM, $
“Anthony Minghella’s stunning production of Puccini’s heartbreaking opera, an instant Met classic since its 2006 premiere, returns with Hui He and Ermonela Jaho in the tragic title role of the trusting geisha. Roberto Aronica and Luis Chapa alternate as her callous American lover, Pinkerton, and Jader Bignamini and Marco Armiliato conduct.”

(Un)Silent Film Night: Improv Edition!
The New School, John L. Tishman Auditorium / 7PM, FREE
“Seven years into their annual mix of classic silents and live music, the College of Performing Arts Theater Orchestra dispenses with scores and wings it — with the help of faculty extemporaneity experts from the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music — during “(Un)Silent Film Night: Improv Edition.” Aaron Copland’s unstaged ballet inspired by Nosferatu seeds Jennifer Reeves’s experimentally macabre 2005 short Shadows Choose Their Horrors, with guitarist Marc Ribot helming the orchestra. Piano wonder Kris Davis sets the tone for Charlie Chaplin’s 1916 short The Pawnshop, which includes an alarm-clock dissection ripe for time-tampering. And avant-garde trailblazers Reggie Workman (bass) and Andrew Cyrille (drums) dig into a pair of 1941 film-noir Superman animations: Dave Fleischer’s The Mad Scientist and The Mechanical Monsters.” (Richard Gehr,Village Voice)

Paquito D’Rivera (also Mar.17)
Rose Theatre, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Broadway at 60th St./ 8PM, $40+
“The saxophone genius Charlie Parker produced some of the most lyrical playing of his condensed career in his “Bird with Strings” projects of 1949-52, particularly his iconic improvisation on “Just Friends.” The Cuban-born saxophone virtuoso D’Rivera will take on this work, as well as some unrecorded scores and material from Parker’s collaborations with the Latin-jazz pioneers Chico O’Farrill and Machito.” (NewYorker)

Maxine Linehan: One—The Songs of U2
Feinstein’s/54 Below; 8:45pm; $35–$80
“Bono she didn’t! Poised and incisive Irish-born singer-actor Linehan gets close to the Edge in a set devoted to the music of U2.” (TONY)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

The History of Tech & The Future of Sex
The Strand, 828 Broadway / 7PM, $20, includes complimentary beer
An Olio Happy Hour on tech and sex taught by Lawrence Cappello and Skye Cleary in Strand’s Rare Book Room.

The Great Laws of Technology – Lawrence Cappello
So people are having sex with robots now. Which is great. Or not. Either way, what a wondrous modern age we all live in. But before we dive into that, we should familiarize ourselves with some of the more dominant ideas and concerns that often come into play whenever humanity talks about technology in general.

Morality and Sexbots – Skye Cleary
We will touch on some of the philosophical issues with the design and use of intimate robots through questions such as: Are lovebots and sexbots mere “objects of our inclinations”, as Kant might argue, or do they deserve more respect? What does it mean to create robots that are designed to consent to our every whim? And at what point do they become morally equivalent to humans?”

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.5 million, had a record 60 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.
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Continuing Events

This is not Manhattan’s WestSide, but it is Brooklyn’s WestSide. If you have never seen these crazy, fearless performers, they are well worth the detour:

STREB EXTREME ACTION (March 2-25 at various times)
at SLAM, 51 N 1st St, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
“Elizabeth Streb’s cavernous Brooklyn space is known as SLAM (Streb Lab for Action Mechanics), which is also a frequent move that occurs at one of her shows. For the month of March, her fearless team of action heroes, as they’re called, will navigate intimidating industrial contraptions and fling themselves from unnatural heights, seemingly defying physics with the pep of cheerleaders. The hourlong show, “S.E.A.” (“Singular Extreme Actions”), encapsulates all the thrill, humor and energizing fun that makes this company so singular.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)

Let there be light!
Erwin Redl’s Whiteout, a newly commissioned public art project, will light up in Madison Square Park. It consists of hundreds of transparent white spheres, each embedded with a white LED light, and suspended from a square grid of steel poles. The swaying sequence of light will be on display until April 2018.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Stephen Shore (thru May 28)

“This immersive and staggeringly charming retrospective is devoted to one of the best American photographers of the past half century. Shore has peers—Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, and, especially, William Eggleston—in a generation that, in the nineteen-seventies, stormed to eminence with color film, which art photographers had long disdained. His best-known series, “American Surfaces” and “Uncommon Places,” are both from the seventies and were mostly made in rugged Western states. The pictures in these series share a quality of surprise: appearances surely unappreciated if even really noticed by anyone before—in rural Arizona, a phone booth next to a tall cactus, on which a crude sign (“GARAGE”) is mounted, and, on a small-city street in Wisconsin, a movie marquee’s neon wanly aglow, at twilight. A search for fresh astonishments has kept Shore peripatetic, on productive sojourns in Mexico, Scotland, Italy, Ukraine, and Israel. He has remained a vestigial Romantic, stopping in space and 
time to frame views that exert a peculiar tug on him. This framing is resolutely formalist: subjects composed laterally, from edge to edge, and in depth. There’s never a “background.” The most distant element is as considered as the nearest. But only when looking for it are you conscious of Shore’s formal discipline, because it is as fluent as a language learned from birth. His best pictures at once arouse feelings and leave us alone to make what we will of them. He delivers truths, whether hard or easy, with something very like mercy.” (NewYorker)

Tarsila do Amaral (thru June 3)

Introducing New York to the First Brazilian Modernist
“Forty-five years after Tarsila do Amaral’s death, MOMA presents her first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S. Some artists are so iconic, they’re known by only one name: Brancusi, Léger, Tarsila. Wait, who? The painter Tarsila do Amaral is so famous in her native Brazil that forty-three years after her death she helped close out the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, when a projected pattern of red-orange-yellow arcs graced the stadium floor, an homage to her 1929 painting “Setting Sun.” That chimerical landscape—stylized sunset above tubular cacti and a herd of capybaras that shape-shift into boulders—hangs now at MOMA, in the artist’s first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S., “Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil.” (NewYorker)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 03/08 and 03/06

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