NYC Events,”Only the Best” (03/22) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, better check the tab above: “NYC Events-March”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Billy Childs (March 22-25)
Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St./ 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $30
“Having won the 2018 Grammy for Best Instrumental Jazz Album, the pianist Childs can place the award alongside his previous four. Although he broke into public view by way of his broad work with such luminaries as Freddie Hubbard and J. J. Johnson, Childs quickly sidestepped categorization as an intrepid hard bopper by investigating diverse hybrid projects, including classical composition and Laura Nyro covers. The most recent Grammy-winning album, “Rebirth,” casts a fond glance back toward his small-group beginnings.” (NewYorker)

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5 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>>Molly Pope: Polly Mope
>>PAUL TAYLOR AMERICAN MODERN DANCE
>>BILL FRISELL
>> Rex Sorgatz: The Encyclopedia of Misinformation
>> The Affordable Art Fair
Continuing Events
>>STREB EXTREME ACTION
>>Whiteout
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Molly Pope: Polly Mope
Greenwich House Music School/ 8PM, $15
“Pope’s viscerally thrilling alto is a rich gusher of sound that emerges like a full-on blast from the past. Now the neo-retro belter takes a step in a new direction, performing a self-exploratory solo show with original songs she has written with composers including musical director Matt Aument.” (TONY)

PAUL TAYLOR AMERICAN MODERN DANCE (through March 25)
at the NYS Theater, Lincoln Center / 7PM, $10+
“Paul Taylor’s spring season continues at Lincoln Center, featuring works from his ample repertory from the 1960s to today, plus newly commissioned work by choreographers Doug Varone and Bryan Arias, and guest appearances by Trisha Brown Dance Company, performing the 1983 postmodern classic “Set and Reset.” This week also sees Sara Mearns, a top ballerina with New York City Ballet, channeling the free-spirited modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan in “Dances of Isadora,” reconstructed by the Isadora Duncan Dance Company.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)
Tonight: Dances of Isadora* | Bryan Arias New Work* | Piazzolla Caldera

BILL FRISELL (through March 25)
at the Village Vanguard / 8:30 and 10:30PM, $35
On Friday, the guitarist, an eminence on New York’s greater improvised music scene, released “Music Is,” his first solo album in almost 20 years. Mr. Frisell has exerted his influence gently, funneling inspiration from 1960s folk rock and 1970s free jazz into a sound that’s hearthlike and imperturbable, whether spinning through reverb-drenched runs or caressing its way through a slow, major-chord progression. This weekend he’s at the Village Vanguard with his trio, featuring the bassist Thomas Morgan and the drummer Rudy Royston. He takes a break on Monday, then returns for six more nights with the violist Eyvind Kang joining the group.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Rex Sorgatz: The Encyclopedia of Misinformation
The Strand, 828 Broadway / 7PM, Price: $19.99 Admission & Signed Copy grants you admission for one, plus one signed copy of the book.
“Wading through propaganda and subterfuge in eclectic contexts, from science and religion, to comedy and law, Rex Sorgatz has explored it all. He has sifted through various conspiracy theories, the complex construct of internet and popular culture, and perplexing psychological phenomena, gathering them together in one humorous collection. His book covers deliriously diverse subjects including auto-tune, Chilean sea bass, false flag operations, kayfabe, laugh tracks, Rachel Dolezal, and more.

Join us in the Rare Book Room as Rex shares his debut encyclopedic work with a panel of experts, including Taylor Lorenz from the Daily Beast.”

The Affordable Art Fair kicks off today, featuring contemporary works, ranging from paintings and prints to sculptures and photographs. Workshops and talks will also be taking place throughout the day at the Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea.
Observer Editors Discuss Affordable Art Fair Favorites

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2017 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.
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Continuing Events

This is not Manhattan’s WestSide, but it is Brooklyn’s WestSide. If you have never seen these crazy, fearless performers, they are well worth the detour:

STREB EXTREME ACTION (March 2-25 at various times)
at SLAM, 51 N 1st St, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
“Elizabeth Streb’s cavernous Brooklyn space is known as SLAM (Streb Lab for Action Mechanics), which is also a frequent move that occurs at one of her shows. For the month of March, her fearless team of action heroes, as they’re called, will navigate intimidating industrial contraptions and fling themselves from unnatural heights, seemingly defying physics with the pep of cheerleaders. The hourlong show, “S.E.A.” (“Singular Extreme Actions”), encapsulates all the thrill, humor and energizing fun that makes this company so singular.” (NYT-BRIAN SCHAEFER)

Let there be light!
Erwin Redl’s Whiteout, a newly commissioned public art project, will light up in Madison Square Park. It consists of hundreds of transparent white spheres, each embedded with a white LED light, and suspended from a square grid of steel poles. The swaying sequence of light will be on display until April 2018.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Stephen Shore (thru May 28)

“This immersive and staggeringly charming retrospective is devoted to one of the best American photographers of the past half century. Shore has peers—Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, and, especially, William Eggleston—in a generation that, in the nineteen-seventies, stormed to eminence with color film, which art photographers had long disdained. His best-known series, “American Surfaces” and “Uncommon Places,” are both from the seventies and were mostly made in rugged Western states. The pictures in these series share a quality of surprise: appearances surely unappreciated if even really noticed by anyone before—in rural Arizona, a phone booth next to a tall cactus, on which a crude sign (“GARAGE”) is mounted, and, on a small-city street in Wisconsin, a movie marquee’s neon wanly aglow, at twilight. A search for fresh astonishments has kept Shore peripatetic, on productive sojourns in Mexico, Scotland, Italy, Ukraine, and Israel. He has remained a vestigial Romantic, stopping in space and 
time to frame views that exert a peculiar tug on him. This framing is resolutely formalist: subjects composed laterally, from edge to edge, and in depth. There’s never a “background.” The most distant element is as considered as the nearest. But only when looking for it are you conscious of Shore’s formal discipline, because it is as fluent as a language learned from birth. His best pictures at once arouse feelings and leave us alone to make what we will of them. He delivers truths, whether hard or easy, with something very like mercy.” (NewYorker)

Tarsila do Amaral (thru June 3)

Introducing New York to the First Brazilian Modernist
“Forty-five years after Tarsila do Amaral’s death, MOMA presents her first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S. Some artists are so iconic, they’re known by only one name: Brancusi, Léger, Tarsila. Wait, who? The painter Tarsila do Amaral is so famous in her native Brazil that forty-three years after her death she helped close out the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, when a projected pattern of red-orange-yellow arcs graced the stadium floor, an homage to her 1929 painting “Setting Sun.” That chimerical landscape—stylized sunset above tubular cacti and a herd of capybaras that shape-shift into boulders—hangs now at MOMA, in the artist’s first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S., “Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil.” (NewYorker)

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 03/20 and 03/18

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