NYC Events,”Only the Best” (06/02) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above: NYC Events-JUNE”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

GREGORY PORTER AND VICTORY
at Rumsey Playfield / 7 p.m., FREE
“The plush-toned Mr. Porter is contemporary jazz’s pre-eminent male vocalist, and one of its more prolific songwriters. But on his most recent album, he chose to cover a collection of pieces associated with Nat King Cole, his hero and in many senses his closest forebear. He plays on a double bill here with Victory Boyd, a vocalist and guitarist on the rise with a powerful and soothing voice. Ms. Boyd may feel quite at home at this concert, part of Central Park’s SummerStage series: She and members of her family had been performing daily in Central Park for years before Jay-Z discovered her and signed her to Roc Nation.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> DAVID BRYANT AND TRISMIC
>> BargeMusic
>> AMERICAN BALLET THEATER
>> EDDIE DANIELS, TED NASH AND HARLEM QUARTET
>> MELISSA ALDANA
>> Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit
>> The 10th annual World Science Festival
>> Scooper Bowl
Continuing Events
>> Othello
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

DAVID BRYANT AND TRISMIC
at Mezzrow / 8 and 9:30PM, $20-$25
“A young and flexible pianist, Mr. Bryant is comfortable playing savvy rearrangements of jazz standards in the basement at Smalls, or filling a featured role in an ensemble led by the experimental composer Henry Threadgill. For these concerts at Mezzrow, he’s put together a trio called Trismic, featuring two other versatile young talents: the bassist Linda Oh and the drummer Kush Abadey.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

BargeMusic
“Music in Motion” Series — a one hour performance, including a Q & A session with the musicians (no intermission)
Fulton Ferry Landing, near the Brooklyn Bridge in Brooklyn/ 4PM, FREE
(take the A or C train to High Street station, Brooklyn.)
“Concert at the coolest classical music concert location in NYC.
Classical music on a boat with an intimate and romantic setting and beautiful view of New York City. Program and musicians TBA.” (ClubFreeTime)

MELISSA ALDANA
at the Jazz Gallery / 7:30 and 9:30PM, $10+
“Ms. Aldana — a tenor saxophonist with a vast improviser’s vocabulary and a cool, even tone — has become one of the most in-demand young musicians in post-bop. This weekend, she presents the debut of “Visions,” a suite she wrote in response to the art of Frida Kahlo, on a commission from the Jazz Gallery. She’ll play in a septet featuring Philip Dizack on trumpet, Jure Pukl on alto saxophone, Joel Ross on vibraphone, Micah Thomas on piano, Rick Rosato on bass and Jeremy Dutton on drums.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

AMERICAN BALLET THEATER (Thru July 7)
at the Metropolitan Opera House / 7:30PM, $35+
Tonight: La Bayadère (May 29-Jun 02)
“This weekend sees more performances of the sumptuous full-length ballet “La Bayadère,” choreographed by Natalia Makarova after Marius Petipa, with a debut of note: Cassandra Trenary performs as Gamzatti in the June 2 matinee. And beginning Monday, Alexei Ratmansky’s new production of “Harlequinade,” a comic ballet in two acts set to music by Riccardo Drigo, takes the stage with what looks to be a stellar opening-night cast: Isabella Boylston as Columbine, James Whiteside as Harlequin, Gillian Murphy as Pierrette and Thomas Forster as Pierrot.” (NYT-Gia Kourlas)

EDDIE DANIELS, TED NASH AND HARLEM QUARTET (June 1-2)
The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center / 7 and 9:30PM, $45+
“Since the 1960s, Mr. Daniels has subtly pushed past the accepted boundaries of what’s expected from a jazz clarinetist. Partly that’s due to the straightforward virtuosity of his playing, and partly to his compulsion to transcend and blend styles. His most recent album, “Heart of Brazil: A Tribute to Egberto Gismonti,” honors a composer whose music is as multivariate as Brazil’s culture. At these concerts, Mr. Daniels is joined by Mr. Nash, a saxophonist and member of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, who arranged some tunes on “Heart of Brazil.” Backed by a jazz combo and Harlem Quartet, a chamber group, they will also play selections from Mr. Nash’s impressive songbook.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

The 10th annual World Science Festival (May30-Jun04)
Various locations, times and places – all the details HERE
“Join us for an exploration of groundbreaking discoveries, encounters with the trailblazing scientists and thinkers who are changing the world, and youth & family events that will inspire the next generation of leaders.

Perennial favorites return, including our main stage Big Ideas programs, the Flame Challenge, Cool Jobs, and free outdoor events that transport science from the lab to NYC’s parks and waterways. This year, we’ll also celebrate the achievements of Women in Science, and explore the impact of the award-winning teachers on the future of scientific discovery.”

Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit
University Place, btw E.13th and Waverly Pl. / 12PM-6PM, FREE
Enjoy looking at (and maybe buying some) oil paintings, pastels, watercolors, mixed media, graphics, photography, sculpture, and crafts including fabric, jewelry, glass, wood, and ceramics.

“This city tradition feels fresh every spring when artists following in the footsteps of Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning set up shop in the park. Hundreds of exhibitors, from NYU students to artists who remember the Village as a creative enclave, display their paintings, sculptures, photography, jewelry and woodcraft.” (TONY)

Plus, a Special Event
Scooper Bowl
Bryant Park / Fri/Sat 12PM-9PM; Sun 12PM-7PM, $25
All-you-can-eat ice cream returns to Bryant Park and I have been waiting for this one all year.

“Sometimes it’s a struggle to pick just two ice cream flavors for your cone.
You won’t have to this weekend, when an all-you-can-eat ice cream festival returns to Bryant Park for its second year, with scoops in more than 60 flavors from 13 commercial and artisanal creameries.

Flavors run the gamut from classics like vanilla to innovative variations like honey comb and Syrian date and walnut, to vegan selections like chocolate chip cookie dough and salted caramel. (Find the full list, released this week, below.) Making their New York premiere are four Haazgen-Dazs flavors, including three with crispy layers of chocolate.”
(amNY)

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Continuing Event

Othello (May28-Jun24)
Shakespeare Delacorte Theater, Central Park / 8PM, FREE*
“Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Jitney) directs the first offering of the Public Theater’s 2018 season of Shakespeare in the Park: an account of the Bard’s fast-paced tragedy of jealousy and misplaced trust, in which a villain preys on the insecurities of a Moorish war hero married to a white woman. The cast is headed by Chukwudi Iwuji as Othello, Corey Stoll as Iago and Heather Lind as Desdemona.”
*tickets are free (two per person) and may be picked up after noon on the day of performance (be prepared for long lines.) Some tickets are also distributed via online lottery.
See TONY’s complete guide to Shakespeare in the Park tickets for details.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

Tarsila do Amaral (thru June 3)

Introducing New York to the First Brazilian Modernist
“Forty-five years after Tarsila do Amaral’s death, MOMA presents her first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S. Some artists are so iconic, they’re known by only one name: Brancusi, Léger, Tarsila. Wait, who? The painter Tarsila do Amaral is so famous in her native Brazil that forty-three years after her death she helped close out the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics, when a projected pattern of red-orange-yellow arcs graced the stadium floor, an homage to her 1929 painting “Setting Sun.” That chimerical landscape—stylized sunset above tubular cacti and a herd of capybaras that shape-shift into boulders—hangs now at MOMA, in the artist’s first-ever museum exhibition in the U.S., “Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil.” (NewYorker)


‘TARSILA DO AMARAL: INVENTING MODERN ART IN BRAZIL’ (through June 3). “The subtitle is no overstatement: In the early 1920s, first in Paris and then back home in São Paulo, Brazil, this painter really did lay the groundwork for the coming of modernism in Latin America’s most populous nation. Tired of the European pretenders in Brazil’s art academies, Tarsila (who was always called by her first name) began to intermingle Western, African and indigenous motifs into flowing, biomorphic paintings, and to theorize a new national culture fueled by the principle of antropofagia, or “cannibalism.” Along with spare, assured drawings of Rio and the Brazilian countryside, this belated but very welcome show assembles Tarsila’s three most important paintings, including the classic “Abaporu” (1928): a semi-human nude with a spindly nose and a comically swollen foot. (Jason Farago)” (NYT)

‘THE LONG RUN’ (through Nov. 4). “The museum upends its cherished Modern narrative of ceaseless progress by mostly young (white) men. Instead we see works by artists 45 and older who have just kept on keeping on, regardless of attention or reward, sometimes saving the best for last. Art here is an older person’s game, a pursuit of a deepening personal vision over innovation. Winding through 17 galleries, the installation is alternatively visually or thematically acute and altogether inspiring.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

Skyscraper Museum

‘MILLENNIUM: LOWER MANHATTAN IN THE 1990S’ (through June 24). “This plucky Battery Park institution transports us back to the years of Rudy Giuliani, Lauryn Hill and 128-kilobit modems to reveal the enduring urban legacy of a decade bookended by recession and terror. In the wake of the 1987 stock market crash, landlords in the financial district rezoned their old skyscrapers for residential occupancy, and more than 20 towers were declared landmarks, including the ornate Standard Oil building at 26 Broadway and the home of Delmonico’s at 56 Beaver Street. Battery Park City flowered; yuppies priced out of TriBeCa came down to Wall Street; a new Guggenheim, designed by a fresh-from-Bilbao Frank Gehry, nearly arose by South Street Seaport. From this distance, the 1990s can seem almost like a golden age, not least given that, more than 16 years after Sept. 11, construction at the underwhelming new World Trade Center is still not finished. (NYT-Farago)

Whitney Museum of American Art

GRANT WOOD: AMERICAN GOTHIC AND OTHER FABLES’ (through June 10). This well-done survey begins with the American Regionalist’s little-known efforts as an Arts and Crafts designer and touches just about every base. It includes his mural studies, book illustrations and most of his best-known paintings — including “American Gothic” and “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere.” Best of all are Wood’s smooth undulant landscapes with their plowmen and spongy trees and infectious serenity. (Smith, NYT)

‘ZOE LEONARD: SURVEY’  (through June 10).
Some shows cast a spell. Zoe Leonard’s reverberant retrospective does. Physically ultra-austere, all white walls with a fiercely edited selection of objects — photographs of clouds taken from airplane windows; a mural collaged from vintage postcards; a scattering of empty fruit skins, each stitched closed with needle and thread — it’s an extended essay about travel, time passing, political passion and the ineffable daily beauty of the world. (Cotter, NYT)
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 05/31 and 05/29.
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