NYC Events,”Only the Best” (06/26) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above: NYC Events-JUNE”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Sisterhood of Swing
led by Bria Skonberg, featuring Regina Carter and Anat Cohen
Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center, Dance lesson at 6:30 pm
Live music at 7:30 pm
“The 2018 dance season in Damrosch Park kicks off with an all-star, all-woman big band led by “the shining hope of hot jazz” Bria Skonberg (New York Times), with jazz violin legend Regina Carter, powerhouse clarinetist Anat Cohen, and some of the jazz world’s best musicians. When this Sisterhood rips into a set of classic swing, you will have no option but to rise up and experience the joy of a night dancing under the stars. The band’s inspiration? The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, the first integrated, all-female swing band that Earl Hines once praised as “the first Freedom Riders.”

“Shaking up the jazz world.” – Vanity Fair on Bria Skonberg
“The finest jazz violinist of her generation.” – New York Times on Regina Carter
“One of the leading clarinetists of her generation, adept at everything from Dixieland to Brazilian music.” – Time Out New York on Anat Cohen

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
>> Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway
>> MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO
>> ALEXANDRA BACHZETSIS
>> American Ballet Theatre
>> Salman Rushdie
>> Hamilton vs. Jefferson: The Rivalry that Shaped America
Continuing Events
>> ‘THE LET GO’
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Naumburg Bandshell, Central Park / 7:30PM, FREE
Mendelssohn & Beethoven in Central Park
“The leaderless chamber orchestra rings in the season of fireflies and chilled rosé with an outdoor program of Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Othmar Schoeck’s lushly evocative Summer Night. It’s not all passionate languor, though: The program concludes with Mahler’s string-orchestra arrangement of Beethoven’s Op. 95 string quartet, “Serioso.” (J.D., NY Magazine)

Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway (June26-30)
Feinstein’s/54 Below / 7PM, $55+
“The vocally superb Brazilian baritone Paulo Szot, who made Broadway audiences swoon as Emile De Becque in the 2008 revival of South Pacific, returns to Feinstein’s/54 with a new batch of favorites from musical-theater history.” (TONY)

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:
MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO
at Murmrr Theater / 8 p.m., $35-$45
“This singer and bassist has been a fixture in the space between R&B, jazz and funk since the early 1990s. On her new album, “Ventriloquism,” Ms. Ndegeocello revisits some of the biggest pop hits of that era, stripping them down to their reflective and occasionally melancholy cores. As an understated challenge to assumptions about genre and gender, the release fits easily with Ms. Ndegeocello’s oeuvre, which has long made subversive ideas about music and culture sound approachable.” (NYT-NATALIE WEINER)

ALEXANDRA BACHZETSIS (June 25-28)
at the High Line at 14th St./ 8 p.m., FREE
“Ms. Bachzetsis, a Swiss artist and choreographer, visits the High Line, New York’s lushly landscaped elevated promenade, with two works in tow. On Monday and Wednesday, she performs her hourlong solo “Private: Wear a Mask When You Talk to Me,” inspired by the postmodern dance pioneer Trisha Brown and featuring a succession of sultry poses, yoga exercises and moves from Michael Jackson. On Tuesday and Thursday, she is joined by Sotiris Vasiliou and Thibault Lac in “Private Song,” which deconstructs gestures, drawing from Greek folk music and dance.” (NYT-Brian Schaefer)

American Ballet Theatre (thru July 7)
Tonight: Don Quixote
Metropolitan Opera House / 7:30PM, $22+
“The most classic of the classic ballets, “Swan Lake,” continues with three more performances on Friday and Saturday. Starting Monday, Ballet Theater switches gears from somber to sprightly with “Don Quixote,” another ballet staple. The company’s adaptation, with vibrant music by Ludwig Minkus, stems from 19th-century productions by Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky that highlight folk dances and showcase virtuosic variations for the characters Kitri and Basilio, who will be danced by different pairings of Ballet Theater principals through June 30..” (NYT-Brian Schaefer)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Salman Rushdie
Strand Book Store, Broadway at 12th St./ 7PM
“Rushdie’s latest novel, “The Golden House,” gets under way on the day of the Obama Inauguration, but it’s not nostalgic for a time of hope. Nero Golden, the ominously named central character, is a billionaire from India who moves to Greenwich Village with his adult sons in tow—a family with the requisite share of secrets. Rushdie teases out his gilded epic with a relationship between the Goldens and a filmmaker who is studying them for a project. The writer discusses the work in the Strand’s Rare Book Room.” (K. Leander Williams, NewYorker)

Hamilton vs. Jefferson: The Rivalry that Shaped America
Schafler Forum, 7 West 83rd St. (located in Congregation Rodeph Shalom) / 7PM, $95
“Hamilton is experiencing a well-deserved revival. Often forced to take a back seat to other Founding Fathers, his vision of America as an economic powerhouse with a dynamic and aggressive government as its engine has found many followers. Hamilton helped get the Constitution ratified, helped found the Federalist Party, and served as the first Secretary of the Treasury. An orphan born in the West Indies, he was like a son to George Washington and perhaps should have been like a brother to Thomas Jefferson.

But Jefferson fought bitterly against the Federalists and his election as president ushered in the “revolution of 1800.” Ironically, it would be Hamilton who helped assure Jefferson’s triumph over Aaron Burr. Jefferson articulated a different vision from Hamilton’s, promoting an agrarian democracy built upon geographic expansion—an “empire of liberty,” he called it. In 1793, he would resign as Secretary of State to protest Hamilton’s policies. In retirement, Jefferson would reflect on the differences between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans and express fear for the future of the new nation.”

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Continuing Events

more coming soon

‘THE LET GO’ (June 7-July 1)
at the Park Avenue Armory
“This large-scale, site-specific multiweek event is masterminded by the interdisciplinary artist Nick Cave, who transforms the armory into a vivid dance landscape in which spectators are invited to do just what the title says they should: let go. Within this dance hall environment are performances, an installation in the form of a Mylar sculpture, dance-based encounters and music provided by D.J.s. For some programs, Mr. Cave works with the choreographer Francesca Harper; for others, there will be dancing by community groups. On June 26, as part of “An Evening of Artistic Responses: The Let Go,” the musician Nona Hendryx, the vocalist and artist Helga Davis, Ms. Harper and Reggie (Regg Roc) Gray and his company, D.R.E.A.M. Ring, respond to the installation, which references issues of social justice, with site-specific performances.” (NYT-Gia Kourlas)

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

‘ADRIAN PIPER: A SYNTHESIS OF INTUITIONS, 1965-2016’ (through July 22). “A clarifying and complicating 50-year view of a major American artist’s career, this exhibition is also an image-altering event for MoMA itself. It makes the museum feel like a more life-engaged institution than the formally polished one we’re accustomed to. For the first time it has given over all of its sixth-floor special exhibition space to a single living female artist who is best known for her art about racism, and for good reason: It’s powerful work, brilliantly varied in form. She has also consistently used her own image in inventive, distanced, self-mocking ways, as in two well-known self-likenesses done several years apart: one, a pencil drawing titled “Self-Portrait Exaggerating My Negroid Features” (1981); the other, a crayon-enhanced photograph called “Self-Portrait as a Nice White Lady” (1995). In these images, as in all of her work, her aim is not to assert racial identity but to destabilize the very concept of it.” (NYT-Cotter)

‘BODYS ISEK KINGELEZ: CITY DREAMS’ (through Jan. 1). “The first comprehensive survey of the Congolese artist is a euphoric exhibition as utopian wonderland featuring his fantasy architectural models and cities — works strong in color, eccentric in shape, loaded with enthralling details and futuristic aura. Mr. Kingelez (1948-2015) was convinced that the world had never seen a vision like his, and this beautifully designed show bears him out.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

‘THE LONG RUN’ (through Nov. 4). “The museum upends its cherished Modern narrative of ceaseless progress by mostly young (white) men. Instead we see works by artists 45 and older who have just kept on keeping on, regardless of attention or reward, sometimes saving the best for last. Art here is an older person’s game, a pursuit of a deepening personal vision over innovation. Winding through 17 galleries, the installation is alternatively visually or thematically acute and altogether inspiring.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

Rubin Museum of Art

Chitra Ganesh: The Scorpion Gesture (Through Jan. 7)
“The Brooklyn artist’s new animations ingeniously combine her own drawings and watercolors with historical imagery, peppering the journeys of bodhisattvas with contemporary pop-culture references. Five of these pieces are installed on the museum’s second and third floors amid its collection of Himalayan art, elements of which appear in her psychedelic sequences of spinning mandalas and falling lotus flowers. (Ganesh’s works are activated, as if by magic, when viewers approach.) In “Rainbow Body,” a cave, which also appears in a nearby painting of Mandarava, is filled with people in 3-D glasses, watching as the guru-deity attains enlightenment. “Silhouette in the Graveyard” is projected behind a glass case containing a small sculpture of Maitreya, from late-eighteenth-century Mongolia, for a cleverly dioramalike effect. Prophesied to arrive during an apocalyptic crisis, the bodhisattva is seen here against Ganesh’s montage, which includes footage of global catastrophes and political protests, from the Women’s March to Black Lives Matter.” (

New-York Historical Society  (thru-9/9)

“Celebrating Bill Cunningham marks the New-York Historical Society‘s recent acquisition of objects, personal correspondence, ephemera, and photographs that reflect the life and work of Bill Cunningham. One of the late 20th century’s most influential trend-spotters and style authorities, the legendary New York Times journalist and photographer was frequently spied on the city’s streets, at fashion shows, and elegant soirées capturing images of New York’s fashion innovators and cultural glitterati. Among the highlights of Celebrating Bill Cunningham are a bicycle that he rode around the city; his first camera, an Olympus Pen-D, 35mm; signature blue jacket; personal photographs of Cunningham at home and with friends; correspondence, including a few of the hand-made Valentines he frequently sent to friends; and a New York City street sign, “Bill Cunningham Corner,” that was temporarily installed at 5th Avenue and 57th Street in his honor, following his death. Soon after he arrived in New York, Cunningham worked as a milliner, and items on view from his millinery line, William J., include an innovative beach hat, along with other hats and fascinators; and a press release written for the William J. spring 1960 millinery show. Also on display are selections from Cunningham’s Facades, his eight-year photographic project documenting New York City’s architectural and fashion history, which was shown at the museum in 2014.” (cityguideny.com)

Also now open at NY Historical SocietySummer of Magic: Treasures from the David Copperfield Collection. (thru Sept.16)

SPECIAL MENTION (not Manhattan’s WestSide)
at the New York (Bronx) Botanical Garden:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: VISIONS OF HAWAI‘I’ (through Oct. 28). “Finding out Georgia O’Keeffe had a Hawaiian period is kind of like finding out Brian Wilson had a desert period. But here it is: 17 eye-popping paradisal paintings, produced in a nine-week visit in 1939. The paintings, and their almost psychedelic palette, are as fleshlike and physical as O’Keeffe’s New Mexican work is stripped and metaphysical. The other star of the show, fittingly, is Hawaii, and the garden has mounted a living display of the subjects depicted in the artwork. As much as they might look like the products of an artist’s imagination, the plants and flowers in the Enid Haupt Conservatory are boastfully real. On Aloha Nights every Saturday in June and every other Saturday in July and August, the garden is staging a cultural complement of activities, including lei making, hula lessons and ukulele performances.” (NYT – William L. Hamilton)
718-817-8700, nybg.org / easy 20 minute ride from Grand Central on Metro North.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 06/24 and 06/22.
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