NYC Events,”Only the Best” (07/20) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above: NYC Events-JULY”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Pat Martino Trio with Horns (July 19-22.)
Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St./ 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $35
“Martino’s roots are never far from the surface of his extravagant guitar playing, yet his recent album, “Formidable,” is a particularly unabashed celebration of the bebop-and-blues ethos he honed in his native Philadelphia, in the late fifties. As on the recording, the organ-and-drums base of his earthy trio will be fleshed out by two horn men: Alex Norris, on trumpet, and Adam Niewood, on saxophone.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Eric Reed
>> Batsheva — The Young Ensemble 
>> Spencer Day: Angel City
>>‘STAND UP AND RESIST’
>> Mostly Mozart Festival: “The Creation”
>> MUMMENSCHANZ
>> Writers on Music: From Miles Davis to Public Enemy
Continuing Events
>> New York Television Festival

>>
Dance on Camera Festival
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Eric Reed (July 20-22.)
Smoke, 2751 Broadway, (btw 105th/106th Sts.) /
The integrated dialects of bebop, gospel, and Thelonious Monk weave through the poised playing of the pianist Eric Reed, who counts such sharp-eared judges of talent as Harold Battiste, Jr., and Wynton Marsalis among his early mentors. This thoroughly matured stylist leads a quintet featuring the trumpeter Jeremy Pelt.
(Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

Batsheva — The Young Ensemble  (July 10-22)
Joyce Theater, 7:30PM, $66+
“Straight from a run at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts comes Batsheva — The Young Ensemble, the junior offshoot of Tel Aviv’s leading troupe Batsheva. The outfit brings with them Naharin’s Virus, a Bessie Award–winning piece by Ohad Naharin, who recently announced that he’s stepping down as the company’s director but will continue to choreograph. Adapted from Peter Handke’s play Offending the Audience, the deeply ambiguous work, which had its U.S. premiere in 2002, includes sections of Handke’s text, a huge blackboard at the back of the stage, and other deeply theatrical strategies.” (Elizabeth Zimmer, VillageVoice)

Spencer Day: Angel City
The Green Room 42 / 7PM, $30
“Once a Harry Connick Jr.–inspired entertainer, Star Search finalist and dreamy crooner, Spencer Day has become a compelling and quirky singer-songwriter, whose tunes are touched by jazz, classical, country and German cabaret. In his new set, he celebrates the release of his seventh album, Angel City.” (TONY)

‘STAND UP AND RESIST’
at Greater Calvary Baptist Church / 7 p.m., $
“The trombonist Craig Harris regularly organizes concerts and educational events in Harlem. This month he has been presenting a three-week series of shows that mix music and poetry, all in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of 1968, a year of upheaval and protest across black America. The events culminate on Friday with a performance by Mr. Harris, the vocalist Helga Davis, the poet Roger Parris, the saxophonist Jay Rodriguez, the keyboardist Adam Klipple, the bassist Calvin Jones and the drummer Shirazette Tinnin.”
(NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Mostly Mozart Festival: “The Creation”
Rose Theatre, 60th St. at Broadway / 7:30PM, $
“La Fura dels Baus, a Catalan company known for glittering productions involving puppetry, aerialists, and digital dazzlement, stages Haydn’s sublime oratorio “The Creation” at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theatre, on July 19 and 20. The work, first performed in 1798 and given its public première the following year, draws from the Book of Genesis, the Psalms, and Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” and reflects its composer’s essentially optimistic morality: devotion and awe are emphasized over pious reprimand. Laurence Equilbey conducts performers including the extraordinary choir accentus and the period-instrument group Insula Orchestra in some of Haydn’s most profound and exhilarating music.” (Steve Smith, NewYorker)

MUMMENSCHANZ (July 4-22)
at the Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College / 7PM, $25-$85
“The famed Swiss theater troupe, founded in 1972, returns to New York with its surreal sensibility — and, of course, plenty of props — to present “You and Me,” a new show created by Floriana Frassetto, one of the group’s founders. Using its usual ingredients of shadow, light, bodies and masks, the group conjures a magical world that is also, handily, good family fare.” (NYT – Gia Kourlas)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Writers on Music: From Miles Davis to Public Enemy
The Strand, 828 Broadway / 7PM, $10 Admission & Gift Card grants you admission for one, plus one $10 gift card to our store.
“The podcast host of “Talk Music Talk with boice” partners with 33 1/3 to present a panel featuring four authors from the series who will discuss the books they wrote on their favorite albums: George Grella (Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew), Ryan Leas (LCD Soundsystem’s Sound of Silver), Amanda Petrusich (Nick Drake’s Pink Moon) and Christopher Weingarten (Public Enemy’s It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back).

33 1/3 is a series of books in which each volume written about a single album and is published by Bloomsbury. Check out the full collection!”

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Continuing Events

New York Television Festival (LAST DAY)
“Pop into screenings for the 59 selections in the pilot competition that anchors the 14th annual fest, and you’ll generally pay no more than $5 (with advance registration); same with special events like the exclusive preview for Bobcat Goldthwait’s new anthology series. The $150 festival pass option is for creatives hoping to work in television and includes panels including one for writers with scribes for “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (pictured) and “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.” (nytvf.com)  (amNY)

Dance on Camera Festival (July 20-24)
Film Society of Lincoln Center / Various times and prices
“A co-production of the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Dance Films Association, this year’s festival — its namesake’s 46th — offers sixteen programs encompassing ambitious features and quirky shorts from seventeen countries. In addition to the programs at the giant Walter Reade Theater, free screenings and discussions take place in the FSLC’s Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center Amphitheater across the street. Grab an all-access pass, another discount package, or single tickets and enjoy the comfy, commercial-free cinema environs.” (Elizabeth Zimmer, VillageVoice)

“If you’ve been wondering what happened to the excellent Dance on Camera film festival, which used to take place in the first weeks of January, here’s your answer: it was moved to the slow weeks in the middle of the summer. The forty-sixth edition contains the usual mix of documentaries, artist portraits, film shorts, and performance archives. Highlights and curiosities include never-before-seen footage of Marcel Marceau, a fourteen-minute film of the extraordinary Indian classical dancer Shantala Shivalingappa performing in South India, a meditation on the history of tap by Mark Wilkinson, and three short films devoted to the Danish Romantic-ballet choreographer August Bournonville.” (Marina Harss, NewYorker)

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

‘ADRIAN PIPER: A SYNTHESIS OF INTUITIONS, 1965-2016’ (through July 22). “A clarifying and complicating 50-year view of a major American artist’s career, this exhibition is also an image-altering event for MoMA itself. It makes the museum feel like a more life-engaged institution than the formally polished one we’re accustomed to. For the first time it has given over all of its sixth-floor special exhibition space to a single living female artist who is best known for her art about racism, and for good reason: It’s powerful work, brilliantly varied in form. She has also consistently used her own image in inventive, distanced, self-mocking ways, as in two well-known self-likenesses done several years apart: one, a pencil drawing titled “Self-Portrait Exaggerating My Negroid Features” (1981); the other, a crayon-enhanced photograph called “Self-Portrait as a Nice White Lady” (1995). In these images, as in all of her work, her aim is not to assert racial identity but to destabilize the very concept of it.” (NYT-Cotter)

‘BODYS ISEK KINGELEZ: CITY DREAMS’ (through Jan. 1). “The first comprehensive survey of the Congolese artist is a euphoric exhibition as utopian wonderland featuring his fantasy architectural models and cities — works strong in color, eccentric in shape, loaded with enthralling details and futuristic aura. Mr. Kingelez (1948-2015) was convinced that the world had never seen a vision like his, and this beautifully designed show bears him out.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

‘THE LONG RUN’ (through Nov. 4). “The museum upends its cherished Modern narrative of ceaseless progress by mostly young (white) men. Instead we see works by artists 45 and older who have just kept on keeping on, regardless of attention or reward, sometimes saving the best for last. Art here is an older person’s game, a pursuit of a deepening personal vision over innovation. Winding through 17 galleries, the installation is alternatively visually or thematically acute and altogether inspiring.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

Rubin Museum of Art

Chitra Ganesh: The Scorpion Gesture (Through Jan. 7)
“The Brooklyn artist’s new animations ingeniously combine her own drawings and watercolors with historical imagery, peppering the journeys of bodhisattvas with contemporary pop-culture references. Five of these pieces are installed on the museum’s second and third floors amid its collection of Himalayan art, elements of which appear in her psychedelic sequences of spinning mandalas and falling lotus flowers. (Ganesh’s works are activated, as if by magic, when viewers approach.) In “Rainbow Body,” a cave, which also appears in a nearby painting of Mandarava, is filled with people in 3-D glasses, watching as the guru-deity attains enlightenment. “Silhouette in the Graveyard” is projected behind a glass case containing a small sculpture of Maitreya, from late-eighteenth-century Mongolia, for a cleverly dioramalike effect. Prophesied to arrive during an apocalyptic crisis, the bodhisattva is seen here against Ganesh’s montage, which includes footage of global catastrophes and political protests, from the Women’s March to Black Lives Matter.” (

New-York Historical Society 

“Celebrating Bill Cunningham (thru 9/9)
marks the New-York Historical Society‘s recent acquisition of objects, personal correspondence, ephemera, and photographs that reflect the life and work of Bill Cunningham. One of the late 20th century’s most influential trend-spotters and style authorities, the legendary New York Times journalist and photographer was frequently spied on the city’s streets, at fashion shows, and elegant soirées capturing images of New York’s fashion innovators and cultural glitterati. Among the highlights of Celebrating Bill Cunningham are a bicycle that he rode around the city; his first camera, an Olympus Pen-D, 35mm; signature blue jacket; personal photographs of Cunningham at home and with friends; correspondence, including a few of the hand-made Valentines he frequently sent to friends; and a New York City street sign, “Bill Cunningham Corner,” that was temporarily installed at 5th Avenue and 57th Street in his honor, following his death. Soon after he arrived in New York, Cunningham worked as a milliner, and items on view from his millinery line, William J., include an innovative beach hat, along with other hats and fascinators; and a press release written for the William J. spring 1960 millinery show. Also on display are selections from Cunningham’s Facades, his eight-year photographic project documenting New York City’s architectural and fashion history, which was shown at the museum in 2014.” (cityguideny.com)

Also now open at NY Historical SocietySummer of Magic: Treasures from the David Copperfield Collection. (thru Sept.16)

SPECIAL MENTION (not Manhattan’s WestSide, but let’s show some love to da Bronx)
at the New York (Bronx) Botanical Garden:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: VISIONS OF HAWAI‘I’ (through Oct. 28). “Finding out Georgia O’Keeffe had a Hawaiian period is kind of like finding out Brian Wilson had a desert period. But here it is: 17 eye-popping paradisal paintings, produced in a nine-week visit in 1939. The paintings, and their almost psychedelic palette, are as fleshlike and physical as O’Keeffe’s New Mexican work is stripped and metaphysical. The other star of the show, fittingly, is Hawaii, and the garden has mounted a living display of the subjects depicted in the artwork. As much as they might look like the products of an artist’s imagination, the plants and flowers in the Enid Haupt Conservatory are boastfully real. On Aloha Nights every Saturday in June and every other Saturday in July and August, the garden is staging a cultural complement of activities, including lei making, hula lessons and ukulele performances.” (NYT – William L. Hamilton)
718-817-8700, nybg.org / easy 20 minute ride from Grand Central on Metro North.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 07/18 and 07/16.
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