October Events +14 Classic and Essential NYCity Films (10/18)

“We search the internet looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

These are the Top 10 NYC Events in October 2018

Φ Archtober all month, all over town

Φ NY Film Festival 9/28-10/14

Φ Fall for Dance @ City Center 10/01-10/13

Φ New York Comic Con 10/04-10/07

Φ New Yorker Festival 10/05-10/07

Φ Cabaret Convention @ Rose Theater TWC 10/9-10/12

Φ NYCity Wine & Food Festival 10/11-10/14

Φ Open House NY Weekend 10/12-10/14

Φ Dutch Masterpieces at The Metropolitan Museum opens 10/16

Φ Photo Plus Expo @ Javits Center 10/25-10/27

Φ the other Oktoberfest, the one with beer

Check the tab above: “NYC Events-October”  for the most detailed, comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

Today is the last day experimenting with the different format – on some days we went visual and offered a selection of the very best NYCity Instagram photos, YouTube videos, or Pinterest Pins. On other days we offered info on the Best NYC Restaurants, Top Online Travel Forums with NYC info, or Essential New York City films. We hope you have found this useful and enjoyable. Please let us know in the comments what you thought. Thanks.

Today it’s Classic and Essential NYCity Films.

If you want to get in the mood for your visit to NYCity, then make yourself some popcorn and pick up a copy of one of these great films at your local Netflix.

(and if you have seen any of these before, remember Director Robert Altman’s advice:
“It’s better to see a great movie again than an average one the first time. Because even though the movie hasn’t changed, you have. And you’ll see something new.”)

The Naked City (1948)

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On the Waterfront (1954)

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Sweet Smell Of Success (1957) — “I love this dirty town!”, says Burt Lancaster — and so do we, in one of his signature films — a sour, caustic tale about a twisted gossip columnist, partly modeled on the legendary Walter Winchell. Lancaster is superb, and guess what, so is Tony Curtis.

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West Side Story (1961)

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Midnight Cowboy (1969) — Two drifters meet in a mutual attempt to survive in, then escape from, Manhattan’s grimy underbelly. Hoffman is incredible as Ratso. The kind they don’t make anymore, this “Cowboy” still packs a hefty wallop.

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The French Connection (1971) — Maybe the best cop movie ever, portraying one of the city’s bigger drug busts back in the day. Gene Hackman won as Oscar and became a bankable star with this movie — and it’s easy to see why.

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The Godfather (1972)

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Mean Streets (1973) — Scorsese’s breakthrough about a conflicted small-time crook and his wacko, self-destructive cousin in Little Italy. Rich in emotion, immediacy, and atmosphere, this film set the pungent, propulsive Scorsese style we’d see again in movies like 1990′s Goodfellas.

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The Godfather, Part 2 (1974) — Coppola managed to improve on a masterpiece with this one, which paints on a broader canvas and offers even richer period flavor. And for the price of Brando, we get a young Robert De Niro, who’s equally brilliant.

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Annie Hall (1977) — Inveterate New Yorker Woody Allen’s best film ever, with some hilariously dead-on insights about the bi-coastal dilemma: New York vs. Los Angeles. I’m with Woody: give me Gotham every time. This turned Diane Keaton into a star, and it’s still her signature role.

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Manhattan (1979)

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Broadway Danny Rose (1984)

Three Woody Allen films in a row may seem a bit much, but for me Woody is the quintessential NYCity film auteur. Heck, I could have added “Hannah and Her Sisters” (1986), “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989), and “Bullets Over Broadway” (1994).

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Moonstruck (1987) — This love letter to Brooklyn is full of charm and humanity, though some disagree… worth the price of admission for Vincent Gardenia and Olympia Dukakis alone. And look for an unusual early turn from Nic Cage as a mooning, eccentric baker.

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A Bronx Tale (1993)

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Half of this list, the ones with comments, is from the wonderful film critic John Farr.
The other half (films without the write up’s) are my additional personal faves.

And if you want another very worthy list, try Thrillist:

The Best Movies That Capture What It Means to Be a New Yorker

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