NYC Events,”Only the Best” (10/24) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s WestSide

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above: NYC Events-October”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Inside Chamber Music
Debussy Sonata for Cello and Piano (1915)
Lincoln Center, Rose Studio / 6:30PM, $25
“Join distinguished composer and radio personality Bruce Adolphe for investigations and insights into masterworks performed during the Alice Tully Hall season. Inside Chamber Music lectures are beloved by regulars and a revelation to first-timers for their depth, accessibility, and brilliance. Each lecture is supported by excerpts from the featured piece, performed live by CMS artists.”

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> STEELY DAN
>> Ravi Coltrane 
>> Robert Glasper
>> American Ballet Theatre
>> Jakob Bro
>> TR’s Last War: the tumultuous last years of Theodore Roosevelt
>> Crafting Beer: Traditional Techniques, Modern Brews
Continuing Events
>> Archtober
>> Harry Potter: A History of Magic
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

STEELY DAN (through Oct. 30)
at the Beacon Theater / 8PM, $25+
“For the first time since Walter Becker’s passing in 2017, Donald Fagen and Steely Dan will be performing several of the band’s most beloved albums in their entirety during their semiregular residency at the Beacon. “Aja” (on Thursday and Oct. 27) and Fagen’s solo effort “The Nightfly” (on Oct. 20 and 29) get two nights each, while “The Royal Scam” (on Wednesday), “Countdown to Ecstasy” (on Oct. 24) and “Gaucho” (on Oct. 26) will each be performed for one night only. Another show, called “By Popular Demand” (on Oct. 21), will be devoted to fan favorites, and the finale (on Oct. 30) will be, fittingly, composed of the band’s greatest hits.” (NYT-NATALIE WEINER)

Ravi Coltrane (Oct. 23-28)
Village Vanguard / 8:30PM, +10:30PM, $35
“His childhood home on Long Island (the onetime domicile of his parents, John and Alice Coltrane) has been officially designated a National Treasure, and the saxophone scion continues to gracefully shoulder the substantial weight of his family legacy, three decades into his career. Coltrane, a compelling improviser and a canny bandleader, is convincingly his own man. He’s joined here by the Israeli pianist Gadi Lehavi.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

American Ballet Theatre (October 17-28)
NYS Theater, Lincoln Center / 2PM, $25-$155
“For two weeks only, join ABT for a beautifully diverse fall season of mixed repertory performances, featuring World Premieres by tap dancer and choreographer Michelle Dorrance and choreographer Jessica Lang.

The season also features ABT’s world-class dancers in audience favorites including Twyla Tharp’s awe-inspiring In the Upper Room, the incomparable Jerome Robbins’s Fancy Free and Other Dances, the return of Alexei Ratmansky’s Songs of Bukovina and Wayne McGregor’s AFTERITE, and George Balanchine’s Symphonie Concertante, as well as ABT’s Studio Company in Lauren Lovette’s Le Jeune.”

Jakob Bro
Jazz Standard / 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $30
“Trying to put your finger on Jakob Bro’s guitar style can be like trying to describe the essence of air. Without resorting to six-string acrobatics, Bro somehow transforms his minimalist turns into weighty, emotionally charged musical statements. He’s joined by the same hypersensitive players—the bassist Thomas Morgan and the drummer Joey Baron—who interact with him on the recent live album “Bay of Rainbows.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

Robert Glasper (thru Oct. 28)
Blue Note, 131 W. 3rd St./ 8PM, +10:30PM, $30-$45
“Spearheading a fresh movement in jazz takes focus, commitment, and not a little bit of guts, and the keyboardist Robert Glasper is ready to exhibit the lot during this nearly monthlong residency. Week one finds him at the helm of his longtime threesome with the bassist Derrick Hodge and the drummer Chris Dave, a wiry trio that juggles swing conventions and hip-hop rhythmic ploys with gleeful impunity.” (Steve Futterman, NewYorker)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

TR’s Last War: the tumultuous last years of Theodore Roosevelt
Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd St./ 6:30PM, FREE
“On his death bed he reflected, “I promised myself that I would work up to the hilt until I was sixty, and I have done it. I have kept my promise…” Highlighting the 1916 presidential campaign, America’s entry into the Great War in 1917, his fury surrounding Woodrow Wilson’s presidency, and his own sons going off to fight, TR’s Last War captures the state of American politics and paints a portrait of an indomitable spirit.”

Crafting Beer: Traditional Techniques, Modern Brews
Japan Society, 333 E. 47th St./ 6:30PM, $35
“Over the past few decades Japan has developed a formidable craft beer scene, but before that, Japanese brewers spent centuries perfecting the brewing of sake. Today, American beer brewers have started to turn to Japan for inspiration, drawing on traditional sake brewing techniques and creating unique new hybrid beverages. At this talk, Joshua M. Bernstein, beer journalist and author of Homebrew World: Discover the Secrets of the World’s Leading Homebrewers, traces how Japanese sake techniques and producers are influencing today’s beer trends. Followed by a tasting of Japanese craft beers and beers influenced by Japan. Must be 21 years of age, or older.”

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Continuing Events

Archtober
31 days, 100+ ways to celebrate design in NYC! The eight annual, month-long festival of architecture activities, programs, and exhibitions in New York City will take place October 1-31, 2017.  Archtober’s calendar features 200 architecture and design lectures, conferences, programs, and exhibitions at more than 60+ collaborating institutions across the city.

Harry Potter: A History of Magic (Now-1/27/19)
New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park W.
“Gather round ye muggles and wizards, squibs and witches, tourists and natives: magic is on its way. Harry Potter: A History of Magic, commemorating the beloved series’s 20th anniversary, is now open at the New-York Historical Society. One of the most eagerly anticipated exhibits to hit the city since, well, ever, the show comes straight from the British Library in London, where, not surprisingly, it was the institution’s most successful exhibition.

Artifacts like crystal balls, Leonardo da Vinci notebooks, and the first written record of the magic word “abracadabra” are among the treasures on display, joined by original materials from author J.K. Rowling’s archives. Also on view to the public for the first time will be Mary GrandPré’s illustrations created for Scholastic’s original editions of the novels. Costumes and set models from Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which opened on Broadway in April, will be showcased in the exhibition. A long list of events will take place in conjunction with the exhibit, including trivia night, talks, an adult costume party, and more.” (cityguideny)
Daily, except most Mondays, $21, $6 ages 5-13, free 4 and younger

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus: Nifty 9 – Best Cabarets / Piano Bars NYCity
These are my favorite places for an after dinner night on the town – music and drinks.
Hit the Hot Link and check out what’s happening tonight:

Feinstein’s/54 Below – 254 W 54th St.

The Green Room 42 – 570 Tenth Ave.

Don’t Tell Mama – 343 W 46th St.

The Rum House, in the Hotel Edison – 228 W. 47th St.

Laurie Beechman Theatre – 407 W 42nd St.

Marie’s Crisis – 59 Grove St.

The Duplex – 61 Christopher St.

Sid Gold’s Request Room – 165 W 26th St.

Cafe Carlyle, in the Carlyle Hotel – 35 E. 76th St.
This is the only one not located on Manhattan’s WestSide, and it ain’t cheap, but it has some of the finest singers.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
My Fave Special Exhibitions – MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s WestSide
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museums,
and also to see their expanded reviews of exhibitions)

Museum of Modern Art:

A special pat on the back to MOMA, who is now displaying art from the seven countries affected by Trump’s travel ban.

“Trump’s ban against refugees from seven Muslim-majority nations has sparked acts of defiance in NYC, from demonstrations across town, to striking taxicab drivers at JFK to Middle Eastern bodega owners closing their shops in protest. Recently, the Museum Of Modern added its two cents by bringing out artworks it owns from the affected countries, and hanging them prominently within the galleries usually reserved for 19th- and 20th-century artworks from Europe and the United States. Paintings by Picasso and Matisse, for example, were removed to make way for pieces by Tala Madani (from Iran), Ibrahim El-Salahi (from Sudan) and architect Zaha Hadid (from Iraq). The rehanging, which was unannounced, aims to create a symbolic welcome that repudiates Trump by creating a visual dialog between the newly added works and the more familiar objects from MoMA’s permanent collection.” (TONY)

‘BODYS ISEK KINGELEZ: CITY DREAMS’ (through Jan. 1). “The first comprehensive survey of the Congolese artist is a euphoric exhibition as utopian wonderland featuring his fantasy architectural models and cities — works strong in color, eccentric in shape, loaded with enthralling details and futuristic aura. Mr. Kingelez (1948-2015) was convinced that the world had never seen a vision like his, and this beautifully designed show bears him out.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

‘THE LONG RUN’ (through Nov. 4). “The museum upends its cherished Modern narrative of ceaseless progress by mostly young (white) men. Instead we see works by artists 45 and older who have just kept on keeping on, regardless of attention or reward, sometimes saving the best for last. Art here is an older person’s game, a pursuit of a deepening personal vision over innovation. Winding through 17 galleries, the installation is alternatively visually or thematically acute and altogether inspiring.” (NYT-Smith)
212-708-9400, moma.org

Rubin Museum of Art

Chitra Ganesh: The Scorpion Gesture (Through Jan. 7)
“The Brooklyn artist’s new animations ingeniously combine her own drawings and watercolors with historical imagery, peppering the journeys of bodhisattvas with contemporary pop-culture references. Five of these pieces are installed on the museum’s second and third floors amid its collection of Himalayan art, elements of which appear in her psychedelic sequences of spinning mandalas and falling lotus flowers. (Ganesh’s works are activated, as if by magic, when viewers approach.) In “Rainbow Body,” a cave, which also appears in a nearby painting of Mandarava, is filled with people in 3-D glasses, watching as the guru-deity attains enlightenment. “Silhouette in the Graveyard” is projected behind a glass case containing a small sculpture of Maitreya, from late-eighteenth-century Mongolia, for a cleverly dioramalike effect. Prophesied to arrive during an apocalyptic crisis, the bodhisattva is seen here against Ganesh’s montage, which includes footage of global catastrophes and political protests, from the Women’s March to Black Lives Matter.” (

SPECIAL MENTION (not Manhattan’s WestSide, but let’s show some love to da Bronx)
at the New York (Bronx) Botanical Garden:

‘GEORGIA O’KEEFFE: VISIONS OF HAWAI‘I’ (through Oct. 28). “Finding out Georgia O’Keeffe had a Hawaiian period is kind of like finding out Brian Wilson had a desert period. But here it is: 17 eye-popping paradisal paintings, produced in a nine-week visit in 1939. The paintings, and their almost psychedelic palette, are as fleshlike and physical as O’Keeffe’s New Mexican work is stripped and metaphysical. The other star of the show, fittingly, is Hawaii, and the garden has mounted a living display of the subjects depicted in the artwork. As much as they might look like the products of an artist’s imagination, the plants and flowers in the Enid Haupt Conservatory are boastfully real. On Aloha Nights every Saturday in June and every other Saturday in July and August, the garden is staging a cultural complement of activities, including lei making, hula lessons and ukulele performances.” (NYT – William L. Hamilton)
718-817-8700, nybg.org / easy 20 minute ride from Grand Central on Metro North.

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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Posts in right Sidebar dated 10/22 and 10/20.
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