NYC Events,”Only the Best” (04/06) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above:  “APRIL NYC Events”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.
To make your own after dinner plans TONIGHT, see the tab above;  “LiveMusic.”

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Elsewhere, but this first Saturday event is always worth the detour,
and it’s easy to get to. Take the #2, or #3 express, stops right at the museum’s front door.

Frida Khalo First Saturday
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Bklyn / 5-11PM, FREE
“The Brooklyn Museum’s First Saturday in April will honor Frida Kahlo with a night of music, performance and art from Mexican-American, Chicanx and Latinx creators like the Calpulli Mexican Dance Company, a performance by Yas Mama! and music by Pistolera.” (amNY)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> MICHAËL ATTIAS
>> Patty Griffin 
>> NATALIA OSIPOVA
>> Joshua Redman Quartet
>> MCCOY TYNER AND CHARLES MCPHERSON WITH THE JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA
>> Brooklyn Folk Festival
>> The Photography Show
>> NYC Craft Beer Festival

Continuing Events
>> New Directors/New Films Festival
>> STREB

COMING SOON (WFUV)
4/8-9 Jeff Tweedy, Town Hall
4/8-9 Andrew Bird, National Sawdust
4/8 Muse, Madison Square Garden
4/9 Charlotte Gainsbourg, Brooklyn Steel
4/10 Melissa Etheridge, Town Hall
4/10 The Wallflowers & Mott the Hoople, Beacon Theatre

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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

MICHAËL ATTIAS
at Greenwich House Music School / 7:30 p.m.; $20
On Friday, Attias will release “Échos la Nuit,” an album of slow, ruminative solo recordings on which he plays both the alto saxophone (his primary instrument) and the piano. Hearing these 12 tracks is like inspecting the mysterious line drawings of a beloved artist. Sometimes you’ll almost discern the contour of a landscape or the dark shading of a limb, but ultimately the shapes all drift back into a desolate, spacious abstraction. At Greenwich House, Attias will perform solo and in a quartet.” (NYT-GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Patty Griffin 
“The Americana singer-songwriter had to battle cancer and complications that took away her voice for awhile before she could complete her new album, “Patty Griffin.” The result isn’t just one of her strongest albums in years but also one of the year’s best; Griffin tackles both personal and political issues on songs like “Mama’s Worried” and “The Wheel.” (Newsday)
WHEN | WHERE 8 p.m. Saturday, April 6, Town Hall, 123 W. 43rd St., Manhattan
INFO $39.50 to $49.50; 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com

NATALIA OSIPOVA 
at New York City Center / 8PM; $35
“Few contemporary ballerinas have the clout to carry a solo show and tour it internationally, but Osipova, a principal with the Royal Ballet, has been a global fan favorite for years. This is because of her ability to fuse fearlessness with vulnerability and apply it to classic and contemporary work alike. For this program, she has recruited David Hallberg, a cherished partner, with whom she will dance the United States premiere of Alexei Ratmansky’s “Valse Triste,” which takes its name from Sibelius’s well-known waltz, and “The Leaves Are Fading” by Antony Tudor. Additional works on the bill — some Osipova will do with other partners; some Osipova and Hallberg will perform solo — are by Iván Pérez, Kim Brandstrup, Roy Assaf and Yuka Oishi.” (NYT-Brian Schaefer)

Joshua Redman Quartet (Apr.2-7)
Blue Note / 8PM, +10:30PM, $30-$45
“One of the biggest saxophone stars of the modern era, Redman plays innovative cuts from an upcoming quartet album—what will be his first in nearly two decades. This agile combo consists of pianist Aaron Goldberg, bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Gregory Hutchinson.” (TONY)

“Critics and fans alike are blown away by Redman’s passionate live performances and acclaimed recordings. In The Joshua Redman Quartet, Redman evokes a sound that can be challenging, provocative, and forward-looking, but also hard-swinging, melodic, and soulful – music with a joyous and celebratory spirit.”

MCCOY TYNER AND CHARLES MCPHERSON WITH THE JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA (April 5-6)
at the Rose Theater / 8p.m.; $
“Two jazz giants, Tyner and McPherson will celebrate their 80th birthdays together in a performance with Wynton Marsalis’s Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. (Tyner reached the milestone late last year; McPherson will turn 80 in July.) The large ensemble will play Tyner’s and McPherson’s compositions, which have been newly arranged for orchestra by members of the group.” (NYT- GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO)

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:

Brooklyn Folk Festival (Ap.5-7)
St. Ann & the Holy Trinity, 157 Montague St., Bklyn / 7PM, $25
“The Brooklyn Folk Festival is entering its eleventh year, which makes it a battle-tested stalwart among music festivals and, in the folk world, a sexy young comer. Presented at St. Ann’s Church by the Jalopy Theatre and School of Music, it thrives on its inclusiveness. This year’s edition opens on April 5 with a Sardinian vocal quartet and concludes, two days and more than forty acts later, with a Malian kora player. It also features workshops on such pursuits as flat-foot dancing; like the beloved Newport festivals of yore, the prevailing vibe is that of a socialist summer camp. Fittingly, one highlight is a sing-along to commemorate Pete Seeger—no doubt presently engaged in unionizing his fellow-angels—on his centennial. Another is the annual Banjo Toss, a wish-fulfillment exercise for generations of bluegrass audiences in which the festival producer Eli Smith leads contestants in hurling the instrument into the poor, unsuspecting Gowanus Canal.” (Jay Ruttenberg, NewYorker)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC EventS

The Photography Show (Apr.05-07)
Marvel at the longest-running photography fair
Pier 94 / 12-7PM, $30
“If a picture’s worth a thousand words, the Photography Show at Pier 94 is swimming in ‘em. Cheryl Medow’s shots of tropical birds in their environments will stop landscape lovers in their tracks, a solo exhibition spotlighting documentary photographer Danny Lyon’s influences will quench journalism junkies’ curiosity, and dudes donning dangly earrings will gawk at David LaChapelle’s iconic portraits.” (thrillist.com

NYC Craft Beer Festival
Sample suds at a craft beer fest
“The NYC Craft Beer Festival promises beverages from more than 70 breweries, and with unlimited beer or cider tastings you’ll be able to try plenty. Guests will also find food available and games, and all will score a souvenir tasting glass to go.” (Newsday)
WHEN | WHERE  1 to 4:30 p.m. and 6 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, April 6; Union West 535 W. 28th St., Manhattan
INFO Admission $55+ per session; 201-434-8700, nyccraftbeerfest.com

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Continuing Events

New Directors/New Films Festival (March 27 to April 7)
The future of cinema.
MoMA Theaters and Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center
“At 48, the joint Museum of Modern Art and Film Society of Lincoln Center festival is one of the most venerable New York film fests — but also the one that’s still most apt to challenge, vex, and explode your perceptions. This year’s starts with a bang — the Sundance sensation Clemency, Chinonye Chukwu’s prison drama with Alfre Woodard and Aldis Hodge. Another Sundance winner, Monos, stars Julianne Nicholson as an American engineer held captive in a South American jungle by teenage guerrillas. The programmers say it’s “sure to be one of the most hotly debated films of 2019,” so see it early and stake out your position.” (David Edelstein, NewYork Magazine)

My favorite NYCity film festival. These films are not all home runs, but it is so exciting when you find the next Pedro Almodóvar.

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STREB (weekends through May 12)
Streb Lab for Action Mechanics, 51 N. 1st St., Bklyn. / Sat.5PM, Sun.3PM; $25
“The shows that STREB Extreme Action puts on at its Williamsburg headquarters  have a carnival atmosphere, and not just because eating and drinking are encouraged. Will the Action Heroes, as the intrepid dancer-acrobats are styled, collide as they hurl themselves off a trampoline? Will they get whacked by swinging cinder blocks or huge metal contraptions? Probably not, but they want you to cringe. Their newest machine is the Molinette, a giant bar that revolves like the blade of a windmill.” (Brian Seibert, NewYorker)

The Streb performers are absolutely amazing and so worth the detour.
I try to see them every year, can’t get enough.

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 65 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Clubs:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. My favorite Jazz Clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide, feature top talent every night of the week.
Hit the Hot Link and check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village:
(4 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. So., villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037 (1st 8:30)
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592 (1st set 8pm)
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883 (1st 7pm)
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346 (1st 8)
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346 (1st set 7:30pm)
The Stone at The New School – 55 w13 St. (btw 6/5 ave) – thestonenyc.com (8:30PM)

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595 (1st set 7:30pm)
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080 (1st 8:30pm)
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com/ 212-864-6662 (7pm)
Jazz Standard – 116 E27 St. (btw Park/Lex) – jazzstandard.com – (1st set 7:30)

For a comprehensive list of the best places to hear All Types of Live Music in Manhattan see the tab above “LiveMusic.”

In Memoriam:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538 (1st 7pm)
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprised with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It was my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.
Alas, Caffe V is no more, another victim of a rapacious NYC landlord. Owner Ishrat fought the good fight and Caffe V will be sorely missed.
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319
And more recently we have lost Cornelia Street Cafe. After 41 years, it too became another victim of an unreasonable rent increase.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Hilma af Klint : Paintings for the Future (thru 04/23/19)

“Convinced that the world was not ready for her artistry in 1906, particularly as an underrepresented female in her field, af Klint of Sweden kept her work private. Her paintings anticipated by years “breakthroughs” by Kandinsky, Mondrian and others and were unseen before 1986. The Guggenheim rediscovers her.”

“Recognized as one of the art world’s earliest abstract painters, Hilma af Klint was a steadfast believer that her work was inspired by the spiritual. The new Guggenheim exhibition, “Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future,” showcases the work of this groundbreaking Swedish artist (1862-1944), whose work was rarely seen until the 1980s.” (Newsday)

See our art critic’s top pick of the year.
“Luckily, the number-one pick in Jerry Saltz’s best art shows of 2018 is still running. Hilma af Klint’s Paintings for the Future at the Guggenheim Museum examines the work of the unacknowledged Swedish visionary and makes a case for her being the first modernist abstract painter. Saltz is especially enamored with the first gallery, so make sure you spend some time there.” (NYMagazine)

GD: Definitely worth a visit. af Klint was like the original Kandinsky and it’s interesting to see both of their works in the same museum, even if not side-by-side.

New-York Historical Society

‘BETYE SAAR: KEEPIN’ IT CLEAN’  (through May 27).

“Saar has been making important and influential work for nearly 60 years. Yet no big New York museum has given her a full retrospective, or even a significant one-person show, since a 1975 solo at the Whitney Museum of American Art. As this exhibition demonstrates, the institutional oversight is baffling, as her primary themes — racial justice and feminism (her 1972 breakthrough piece, “The Liberation of Aunt Jemima,” merges the two by transforming the racist stereotype of the smiling black mammy into an armed freedom fighter) — are exactly attuned to the present.” (Cotter-NYT)
212-873-3400, nyhistory.org

‘SCENES FROM THE COLLECTION’  “After a surgical renovation to its grand pile on Fifth Avenue, the Jewish Museum has reopened its third-floor galleries with a rethought and refreshed display of its permanent collection, which intermingles modern and contemporary art, by Jews and gentiles alike — Mark Rothko, Lee Krasner, Nan Goldin, Cindy Sherman, and the excellent young Nigerian draftswoman Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze — with 4,000 years of Judaica. The works are shown in a nimble, non-chronological suite of galleries, and some of its century-spanning juxtapositions are bracing; others feel reductive, even dilletantish. But always, the Jewish Museum conceives of art and religion as interlocking elements of a story of civilization, commendably open to new influences and new interpretations.” (Farago) 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org

Museum of the City of New York

NY AT ITS CORE (ongoing)
“Ten years in the making, New York at Its Core tells the compelling story of New York’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” The exhibition captures the human energy that drove New York to become a city like no other and a subject of fascination the world over. Entertaining, inspiring, important, and at times bemusing, New York City “big personalities,” including Alexander Hamilton, Walt Whitman, Boss Tweed, Emma Goldman, JP Morgan, Fiorello La Guardia, Jane Jacobs, Jay-Z, and dozens more, parade through the exhibition. Visitors will also learn the stories of lesser-known New York personalities, like Lenape chieftain Penhawitz and Italian immigrant Susie Rocco. Even animals like the horse, the pig, the beaver, and the oyster, which played pivotal roles in the economy and daily life of New York, get their moment in the historical spotlight. Occupying the entire first floor in three interactive galleries (Port City, 1609-1898, World City, 1898-2012, and Future City Lab) New York at Its Core is shaped by four themes: money, density, diversity, and creativity. Together, they provide a lens for examining the character of the city, and underlie the modern global metropolis we know today. mcny.org” (NYCity Guide)

and you should be sure to check out these special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish for NewYorkers)

“In Praise of Painting” (thru Oct.4, 2020)

“How great are the Met’s holdings in the Dutch golden age? Very. This long-term installation rings the lower level of the Lehman Wing with scores of lesser-known gems from the mid-seventeenth century, many of them rarely on view before, amid masterworks by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Hals, and Ruisdael. The period, vivified here, began in 1648, when the end of the Eighty Years’ War with Spain brought a boom in wealth and morale, expressed by genre paintings that exalt the national ideal of gezelligheid—social warmth, comfort, belonging. A key figure was Gerard ter Borch, who had travelled widely and worked at the court of Philip IV, in company with Velázquez. Ter Borch’s lustrous, ineffably witty domestic scenes inspired a generation of masters, notably Vermeer, whose genius rather eclipsed his elder’s. The pictures often star ter Borch’s younger sister Gesina, preening in satins or enigmatically musing. Herself a painter, she is cutely funny-looking—pointy nose, weak chin—and desperately lovable. There’s much to be said for a world with such a family in it.”

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW) for NewYorkers

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (Wed 2-6pm PWYW; First Friday each month (exc Jan+Sep) 6-9pm FREE) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 04/04 and 04/02.
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