NYC Events,”Only the Best” (06/28) + Museum Special Exhibitions: Manhattan’s 5th Avenue

“We search the internet everyday looking for the very best of What’s Happening, primarily on Manhattan’s WestSide, so that you don’t have to.” We make it as easy as 1-2-3.

For future NYC Events, check the tab above: NYC Events-JUNE”
It’s the most comprehensive list of top events this month that you will find anywhere.
Carefully curated from “Only the Best” NYC event info on the the web, it’s a simply superb resource that will help you plan your NYC visit all over town, all through the month.

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Have time for only one NYC Event today? Do this:

Kronos Quartet (June 28-29)
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave./ 8PM, $55
The inveterate explorers of Kronos share an evening uptown with Soo Yeon Lyuh, a gifted young exponent of the haegeum (the two-stringed Korean fiddle, which produces an expressively plaintive keen). Lyuh performs first, with traditional accompaniment; Kronos follows with a globe-trotting mix of African, Indian, South American, and gospel selections. They end together, in Lyuh’s haunting “Yessori (Sound from the Past).” The next day, Kronos travels to Katonah for its Caramoor Festival début, offering an eclectic grab bag of contemporary fare by Terry Riley and Steve Reich, along with arrangements of songs by Gershwin, Rhiannon Giddens, and Laurie Anderson, among others.” (Steve Smith, VillageVoice)

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7 OTHER TOP NYC EVENTS TODAY (see below for full listing)
>> Lucia Cadotsch
>>Adrian Cunningham Quintet
>> Translucent Borders
>> The Blues Project Featuring Dorrance Dance
>> American Ballet Theatre
>> Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway
>> Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything
Continuing Events
>>
World Cup viewing parties
>> ‘THE LET GO’
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Music, Dance, Performing Arts

Lucia Cadotsch
Joe’s Pub / 9:30PM, $15–$20
“Zürich-born, Berlin-based jazz singer Lucia Cadotsch has been busy reinvigorating ye olde Great American Songbook as part of Speak Low. Accompanied by Otis Sandsjö, a saxophonist whose raw embellishment consists of overblown notes and looping ostinatos à la Colin Stetson, and Petter Eldh, a double-bassist who attacks his instrument as though he were wrestling an alligator to the ground, Cadotsch focuses her clear, strong voice on tunes that might have seemed played out a couple of decades ago. On the same playground as the Thing with Neneh Cherry, Speak Low perform tunes like Henry Mancini’s “Slow Hot Wind,” Nina Simone’s “Ain’t Got No, I Got Life,” and Kurt Weill’s “Speak Low” as rediscovered artifacts from a pile of nuclear rubble, dusting them off and coolly assaying their former glory.” (Richard Gehr, VillageVoice)

Adrian Cunningham Quintet with special guest vocalist Brianna Thomas (to Jun30)
From My Fair Lady to Camelot: Music by Frederick Loewe and Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
Dizzy’s Club, Jazz at Lincoln Center / 7:30PM, +9:30PM, $40
“An evening celebrating the great musicals of Lerner & Loewe, including My Fair Lady, Brigadoon and Camelot.

With support from the Loewe Foundation, Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola celebrates the great Lerner and Loewe musicals by revisiting Lowe’s timeless compositions in a swinging jazz context. This program will continue the popular and fruitful relationship between musical theater and jazz—a relationship in which Lerner and Loewe played an essential role.”

Translucent Borders
Atrium at Lincoln Center/ 7:30PM, FREE, but get there early for a seat.
“Translucent Borders, an NYU/Tisch initiative, has spent the last three years bringing renowned artists from around the world together to develop ways that dialogue can fuel creative work while retaining cultural identity and integrity. This evening’s concert brings together leading Cuban, Ghanaian, Palestinian, Israeli, Italian, and American artists to premiere a new collaborative work and celebrate the power of music to transcend borders.”

Elsewhere, but this looks worth the detour:
The Blues Project Featuring Dorrance Dance With Toshi Reagon & BIGLovely
Prospect Park Bandshell / 8PM, FREE
“A strong and lucid voice in the new film American Tap, Michelle Dorrance is one of the collaborators on this superb show that delighted at the Joyce three summers ago. Here it’s free (though they’ll happily accept your donation), and includes the work of musical collaborators Toshi Reagon and her quintet BIGLovely; dance collaborators Derick K. Grant and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards; and Dorrance’s company of loose-limbed, powerful tap dancers.” (Elizabeth Zimmer, Village Voice)

“The Blues Project brings together today’s best tap artists, musicians, and choreographers in an innovative evening of rhythm, original live music, explosive energy, and raw emotion. Combining exceptional tap dance company Dorrance Dance with the elemental musical force that is Toshi Reagon & Biglovely, the work reveals “a deep merging of forms: As Reagon’s music envelops the dancing, the dancing seeps through to the last chord and sometimes even beyond it.” (The New York Times)

American Ballet Theatre (thru July 7)
Tonight: Don Quixote
Metropolitan Opera House / 7:30PM, $22+
“The most classic of the classic ballets, “Swan Lake,” continues with three more performances on Friday and Saturday. Starting Monday, Ballet Theater switches gears from somber to sprightly with “Don Quixote,” another ballet staple. The company’s adaptation, with vibrant music by Ludwig Minkus, stems from 19th-century productions by Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky that highlight folk dances and showcase virtuosic variations for the characters Kitri and Basilio, who will be danced by different pairings of Ballet Theater principals through June 30..” (NYT-Brian Schaefer)

Paulo Szot: Salute to Broadway (June26-30)
Feinstein’s/54 Below / 7PM, $55+
“The vocally superb Brazilian baritone Paulo Szot, who made Broadway audiences swoon as Emile De Becque in the 2008 revival of South Pacific, returns to Feinstein’s/54 with a new batch of favorites from musical-theater history.” (TONY)

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Smart Stuff / Other NYC Events
(Lectures/Discussions, Book Talks, Film, Classes, Food & Drink, Other)

Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything
The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Ave./ 6PM, $12
“The history of endocrinology is replete with daring medical sleuths, desperate patients, and, unfortunately, swindlers. There are doctors who have tinkered with hormones to devise life-saving therapies and shed light on the inner workings of our bodies. And there have been hucksters exploiting the seeds of these discoveries to peddle quack cures touting all sorts of promises, including libido-boosters and anti-aging remedies. Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein will separate the hype from the hope and elucidate how discoveries and mishaps in the past shape our perceptions, our hopes, and our fears about hormones and hormone therapies today.”

Alexander Hamilton: The Illustrated Biography
Bryant Park, Sixth Ave. and 42nd St. Reading Room / 12:30PM, FREE
“This richly illustrated biography by NYU’s Richard Sylla portrays Alexander Hamilton’s fascinating life alongside his key contributions to American history, including his unsung role as an early abolitionist.”

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Continuing Events

World Cup viewing parties (starting June 14 – thru July 15)
Don’t miss the World Cup, which only comes every four years. Many bars and restaurants will be screening the games and offering food and drink specials across the city. Here are the best lists of where you can find them:
NYT – where to watch the World Cup in New York City.
Soccer Republic – best bars to watch the World Cup in NYC.
Thrillist – World Cup bars NYC
Remeczcla – the 10 Best Venues to Watch the World Cup in NYC
Metro – NYC’s best soccer bars to watch the FIFA World Cup 2018
NYCGO – Ways to Watch the World Cup in New York City
Daily News – The best bars in NYC to watch your favorite team

‘THE LET GO’ (June 7-July 1)
at the Park Avenue Armory
“This large-scale, site-specific multiweek event is masterminded by the interdisciplinary artist Nick Cave, who transforms the armory into a vivid dance landscape in which spectators are invited to do just what the title says they should: let go. Within this dance hall environment are performances, an installation in the form of a Mylar sculpture, dance-based encounters and music provided by D.J.s. For some programs, Mr. Cave works with the choreographer Francesca Harper; for others, there will be dancing by community groups. On June 26, as part of “An Evening of Artistic Responses: The Let Go,” the musician Nona Hendryx, the vocalist and artist Helga Davis, Ms. Harper and Reggie (Regg Roc) Gray and his company, D.R.E.A.M. Ring, respond to the installation, which references issues of social justice, with site-specific performances.” (NYT-Gia Kourlas)

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♦ Before making final plans, we suggest you call the venue to confirm ticket availability, plus dates and times, as schedules are subject to change.
♦ NYCity, with a population of  8.6 million, had a record 63 million visitors last year and was TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Top U.S. Destination for 2018 – awesome! BUT quality shows draw crowds. Try to reserve seats for these top NYC events in advance, even if just earlier on the day of performance.

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Bonus NYC events– Jazz Clubs:
Many consider NYCity the Jazz capital of the world. My favorite Jazz Clubs, all on Manhattan’s WestSide, feature top talent every night of the week.
Hit the Hot Link and check out who is playing tonight:

Greenwich Village:
(5 are underground, classic jazz joints. all 6 are within walking distance of each other):
Village Vanguard – UG, 178 7th Ave. So., villagevanguard.com, 212-255-4037 (1st 8:30)
Blue Note – 131 W3rd St. nr 6th ave. bluenotejazz.com, 212-475-8592 (1st set 8pm)
55 Bar – basement @55 Christopher St. nr 7th ave.S. 55bar.com, 212-929-9883 (1st 7pm)
Mezzrow – basement @ 163 W10th St. nr 7th Ave. mezzrow.com,646-476-4346 (1st 8)
Smalls – basement @ 183 W10th St. smallslive.com, 646-476-4346 (1st set 7:30pm)
Cornelia Street Cafe – UG, 29 Cornelia St. corneliastreetcafe.com, 212-989-9319 (6pm)

Outside Greenwich Village:
Dizzy’s Club – Broadway @ 60th St. — jazz.org/dizzys / 212-258-9595 (1st set 7:30pm)
Birdland – 315 W44th St.(btw 8/9ave) — birdlandjazz.com / 212-581-3080 (1st 8:30pm)
Smoke Jazz Club – 2751 Broadway nr.106th St. — smokejazz.com/ 212-864-6662 (7pm)

Special Mention:
Caffe Vivaldi – 32 Jones St. nr Bleecker St. — caffevivaldi.com / 212-691-7538 (1st 7pm)
a classic, old jazz club in the Village, Caffe V often surprises with a wonderfully eclectic lineup. It’s my favorite spot for an evening of listening enjoyment and discovery.

Alas, Caffe V is no more, another victim of a rapacious NYC landlord. Owner Ishrat fought the good fight and Caffe V will be sorely missed.

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NYCity Vacation Travel Guide Video (Expedia):

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WHAT’S ON VIEW
These are My Fave Special Exhibitions @ MUSEUMS / Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue
(See the New York Times Arts Section for listings of all museum exhibitions,
and also see the expanded reviews of these exhibitions)

‘SCENES FROM THE COLLECTION’  “After a surgical renovation to its grand pile on Fifth Avenue, the Jewish Museum has reopened its third-floor galleries with a rethought and refreshed display of its permanent collection, which intermingles modern and contemporary art, by Jews and gentiles alike — Mark Rothko, Lee Krasner, Nan Goldin, Cindy Sherman, and the excellent young Nigerian draftswoman Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze — with 4,000 years of Judaica. The works are shown in a nimble, non-chronological suite of galleries, and some of its century-spanning juxtapositions are bracing; others feel reductive, even dilletantish. But always, the Jewish Museum conceives of art and religion as interlocking elements of a story of civilization, commendably open to new influences and new interpretations.” (Farago) 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org

Museum of the City of New York

NY AT ITS CORE (ongoing)
“Ten years in the making, New York at Its Core tells the compelling story of New York’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” The exhibition captures the human energy that drove New York to become a city like no other and a subject of fascination the world over. Entertaining, inspiring, important, and at times bemusing, New York City “big personalities,” including Alexander Hamilton, Walt Whitman, Boss Tweed, Emma Goldman, JP Morgan, Fiorello La Guardia, Jane Jacobs, Jay-Z, and dozens more, parade through the exhibition. Visitors will also learn the stories of lesser-known New York personalities, like Lenape chieftain Penhawitz and Italian immigrant Susie Rocco. Even animals like the horse, the pig, the beaver, and the oyster, which played pivotal roles in the economy and daily life of New York, get their moment in the historical spotlight. Occupying the entire first floor in three interactive galleries (Port City, 1609-1898, World City, 1898-2012, and Future City Lab) New York at Its Core is shaped by four themes: money, density, diversity, and creativity. Together, they provide a lens for examining the character of the city, and underlie the modern global metropolis we know today. mcny.org” (NYCity Guide)

and you should be sure to check out these special exhibitions at that little museum on Fifth Ave., The Metropolitan Museum of Art
(open 7 days /week, AND always Pay What You Wish for NewYorkers)

‘THE FACE OF DYNASTY: ROYAL CRESTS FROM WESTERN CAMEROON’ (through Sept. 3). “Upstairs, the Michelangelos continue to knock ‘em dead; downstairs, in the African wing, a show of just four commanding wooden crowns constitutes a blockbuster of its own. These massive wooden crests — in the form of stylized human faces with vast vertical brows — served as markers of royal power among the Bamileke peoples of the Cameroonian grasslands, and the Met’s recent acquisition of an 18th-century specimen is joined here by three later examples, each featuring sharply protruding cheeks, broadly smiling mouths, and brows incised with involute geometric patterns. Ritual objects like these were decisive for the development of western modernist painting, and a Cameroonian crest was even shown at MoMA in the 1930s, as a “sculpture” divorced from ethnography. But these crests had legal and diplomatic significance as well as aesthetic appeal, and their anonymous African creators had a political understanding of art not so far from our own.” (Farago)

‘HEAVENLY BODIES: FASHION AND THE CATHOLIC IMAGINATION’  (through Oct. 8). “Let us pray. After last year’s stark exhibition of Rei Kawakubo’s irregular apparel, the Met Costume Institute is back in blockbuster mode with this three-part blowout on the influence of Catholicism on haute couture of the last century. The trinity of fashion begins downstairs at the Met with the exceptional loans of vestments from the Vatican; upstairs are gowns fit for angels in heaven (by Lanvin, Thierry Mugler, Rodarte) or angels fallen to earth (such as slinky Versace sheaths garlanded with crosses). The scenography at the Met is willfully operatic — spotlights, choir music — which militates against serious thinking about fashion and religion, but up at the Cloisters, by far the strongest third of the show, you can commune more peacefully with an immaculate Balenciaga wedding gown or a divine Valentino gown embroidered with Cranac’s Adam and Eve.” (Farago)

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Museum Mile is a section of Fifth Avenue which contains one of the densest displays of culture in the world. Eight museums can be found along this section of Fifth Avenue:
• 105th Street – El Museo del Barrio (closed Sun-Mon)*
• 103rd Street – Museum of the City of New York (open 7 days /week)
•  92nd Street – The Jewish Museum (closed Wed) (Sat FREE) (Thu 5-8 PWYW)
•  91st Street  –  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (open 7 days /week)
•  89th Street –  National Academy Museum (closed Mon-Tue)
•  88th Street –  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (closed Thu) (Sat 6-8 PWYW)
•  86th Street –  Neue Galerie New York (closed Tue-Wed) (Fri 6-8 FREE)
Last, but certainly not least, America’s premier museum
•  82nd Street – The Metropolitan Museum of Art (open 7 days /week)*
*always Pay What You Wish (PWYW) for NewYorkers

Although technically not part of the Museum Mile, the Frick Collection (closed Mon) (Wed 2-6pm PWYW; First Friday each month (exc Jan+Sep) 6-9pm FREE) on the corner of 70th St. and Fifth Avenue and the The Morgan Library & Museum (closed Mon) (Fri 7-9 FREE) on Madison Ave and 37th St are also located near Fifth Ave.
Now plan your own museum crawl (info on hours & admission updated June 2, 2015).
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For other selected Museum and Gallery Special Exhibitions see Recent Posts in right Sidebar dated 06/26 and 06/24.
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